how to install a bilge pump @ 67 Slickcraft?

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by ftaloco, Apr 22, 2009.

  1. ftaloco
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: worcester

    ftaloco New Member

    hi!
    i just got my first boat wich is is a 67 slickcraft with a outboard evinrude 65 hp,
    Im having some problems... the boat dont have a bilge pump, and i do live @ lake so i would like to live the boat in the water, but almost every week i have to take it out to drain the water...i try to install a pump, but there is no access under the boat, what should i do?
     
  2. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
    Posts: 3,731
    Likes: 121, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1404
    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    The back of the boat is where to put it, since without people in it the boat will always sit lowest there. under the splash well, far back as possible. Get an automatic one. It will turn on every few minutes and if there's no water, it will turn off, if water, it will remove it through a hose (you will have to buy) over into the splash well where it will drain out. One wire goes to the battery ground and one to a switch (or directly to the battery positive post) and it must have at least an inline fuse (it will say what size fuse in the directions). It shouldn't tax the battery too much. Leave it with a good charge in the battery though. You will have to crimp eyes onto the wire ends sized to the battery posts, available at a marine supply. maybe they will crimp them on for you for nothing.
     
  3. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
    Posts: 4,127
    Likes: 147, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2043
    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    A few more bilge pump points of interest:

    * Don't count on the pump actually moving more than 50% of its claimed flow rate, once the outlet hose, a bit of gunk on the intake strainer, etc. is considered

    * If you forget to put a 3/4" drain plug in, once it's 16" underwater it will let in about 420 gph, more as the boat sinks deeper

    * If a 1.5" through-hull breaks at 16" below water, it'll let in closer to 1700 gph

    * A wave breaking over a 6' wide transom might bring 40+ gallons of water; how long would you want that water in the boat before it's all pumped out?

    The standard little discount-bin 600 gph pump (you know, the little plastic one the size of a coffee mug) can handle a rainstorm, but not much more. Look for something beefy enough to make you comfortable with the numbers above.

    If you can't get to the bilge, it shouldn't be too hard to take a jigsaw or a big hole saw to cut an access port in the sole.
     

  4. ftaloco
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: worcester

    ftaloco New Member

    ok thats the thing, i dont any idea where should i cut the hole...should i cut biger enough to fit the pump? and where?
    another thing, i dont know if anyone is familiar with the slickcraft, but this boat has 3 plugs holes, one on the botton, that you can take with a screw driver, a other one maybe 3 inches on top ( that leads to inside where is the gas tank, where i do have acess) and the last one is locate inside where the gas tank is, but its seems to go inside the hull....
    any ideas?
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. K_McIntosh
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    673
  2. Chuck Losness
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    508
  3. sdowney717
    Replies:
    18
    Views:
    4,347
  4. sunsetrider
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    1,320
  5. Landlubber
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    3,745
  6. mymind04
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,185
  7. drewm3
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    3,863
  8. yachtwork
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    10,536
  9. Brylk1830
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    3,145
  10. Brylk1830
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    2,127
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.