How to extend Hatteras LRC 48 Cockpit?

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by pha7env, Jun 26, 2012.

  1. pha7env
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    Location: Lake Dannelly, Alabama River

    pha7env Junior Member

    We are nearing the purchase of a 48' Hatteras Long Range Cruiser. The boat is awesome, but has a proportionally small cockpit area. There is only one that has been extended and it turned out great. I spoke with her owner and he said the previous owner paid 100K to get it done. I would love to do it, should we get one purchased, but could never putt 100K in any single upgrade. I have two questions of the group. One is, how hard is it to do, and the second question is what would a reasonable cost be?.
     
  2. pha7env
    Joined: Aug 2011
    Posts: 90
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 12
    Location: Lake Dannelly, Alabama River

    pha7env Junior Member

  3. Eric Sponberg
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Location: On board Corroboree

    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    Pha7env--

    A lot depends on how long you want to extend the hull. Your example of the extended boat shows what appears to be just a short extension of maybe 2-3'. The reported cost is probably the best data point that you have and it sounds reasonable. I recently did a ballpark estimate for a fiberglass 90'er stern extension, based on some shipyard experience, and the projected anticipated ballpark figure was about $250,000 to $300,000. One of my steel Moloka'i Strait 65'ers was extended recently with a 3' swim platform extension, and the steel work alone was about $80,000--finishing for paint and trim would have been on top of that. On one of my projects about 15 years ago was a new false bow on a 38' sailboat, and that project was about $25.000 to $30,000 at that time. Scale that up to today's numbers, and you're probably looking at $42,000 to $50,000 in today's dollars. A new transom is going to involve more work (labor) and more materials. So $100K does not seem unreasonable.

    You have to be careful and be sure that the boatyard doing the work knows what it is doing. A short extension is possible, such as you describe, with no adverse handling. The longer you make the extension, the more you are going to change the flotation and stability of the boat, and to do the job properly, you should have a naval architect redraw the lines for the boat, calculate current stability and the new stability, which would involve doing before and after stability tests either side of the modification. You should have a naval architect anyway spec out the modification procedure backed up by proper engineering and drawings.

    The other thing that comes into consideration is what do you do with the running gear--the rudders, shafts, props, and struts? For a short extension, you can leave all this equipment where it is, and you probably won't have any adverse running effects. However, for a long extension, if you leave the running gear where it is, you will likely end up with some bad handling problems--won't float right, won't turn well, and won't run at a proper trim. Lots of bad things can happen. To get around that, you have to move all the running gear, provided there is room in the boat to do that. The engines, shafts, struts, props, and rudders all have to move aft. That makes the job really expensive. May as well just buy a proper sized boat.

    Those are the considerations. I hope that puts some perspective on it. the price of $100K does not seem improper.

    Eric
     
  4. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    Location: Florida

    mydauphin Senior Member

    Piloted an extrended yacht fish, similar to what your talking about, don't remember details many years ago. Wouldn't track straight, rudders too far in middle. If all you want is more room in back add a platform. Big problem I find on those boats, the owners put too much junk up stairs. Make more room, move dingy, open up area.
     

  5. pha7env
    Joined: Aug 2011
    Posts: 90
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    Location: Lake Dannelly, Alabama River

    pha7env Junior Member

    I am in communication with the owner of the extended LRC and he says she handles great. I will find out if the Props and rudder were relocated. The extension was right at 4 feet. The design works because a similar platform was used in the 48 and 58 foot LRC's. My wish was to make a more user friendly platform for fishing and extending the use of the Salon which is at the same level. Not 100 K worth. I will live within my means and when i find that 100k laying around, i will find a longer boat. Might be just skippy with the existing. Just trying to find out what my options are.
     
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