how to design the spud barge

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Amar Amran, Jan 5, 2012.

  1. Amar Amran
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Malaysia

    Amar Amran New Member

    can someone show me how to design the barge with the spud..I'm stuck with the spud arrangement for the barge..
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 479, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Are these the mobile spud or fixed spud launchers?
     
  3. Amar Amran
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Malaysia

    Amar Amran New Member

    it is the spud for the 250 ft ocean going barge..the barge is used for the pipe lay repair..how to arrange the spud on the barge..if the are any method to calculate or example i can use to do that?
     
  4. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 2,329
    Likes: 126, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1603
    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    "Spud" is something most of us aren't familiar with in the way you are using it. To most folks around here a "Spud" is a slang term for a Potato...(Hence PAR's question about launchers...as in Potato guns and other launchers for on the water fun games/wars between small boats)

    Please describe what you are calling a "Spud". What is its function? What does it generally consist of? What is it normally constructed of? Where does it go on the barge?
     
  5. Amar Amran
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Malaysia

    Amar Amran New Member

    sorry for not explain more about it..the spud i refer is like in this picture..it is used for stabilize the barge..it's like jack up barge..
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 3,003
    Likes: 329, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Here's a definition for Spud Barge

    So spuds are the piles in Amar's pic that go through or alongside the hull to the bottom to moore and stabilize the barge.

    [​IMG]

    Cheers,
    Angel
     
  7. BPL
    Joined: Dec 2011
    Posts: 217
    Likes: 15, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 209
    Location: Home base USA

    BPL Senior Member

    Right. A spud = a piling. I've heard that before.
    I've also seen people write pile or spile instead of piling - don't know if they were bad at texting or it's the lingo somewhere.
     
  8. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 3,003
    Likes: 329, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    'Spud' in Dutch is 'Sputh' . . . . (the link is a Dutch PDF, but it has pics of the design on page 2)

    Good luck !
    Angel
     
  9. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 3,003
    Likes: 329, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    [​IMG]

    Dutch link ---> Google translation in English or Malay or to set above in what ever language you like . . . .

    Cheers,
    Angel
     
  10. Amar Amran
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Malaysia

    Amar Amran New Member

    thank you for all your help..it help me to do the design :)
     
  11. cthippo
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 803
    Likes: 46, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 465
    Location: Bellingham WA

    cthippo Senior Member

    Most spud barges I've seen the spud doesn't go through the deck but rather is attached to the outside of the gunwale with a cable mechanism. The spud (movable piling) moves up and down through a ring or bracket attached to the barge on a cable. The cable is attached to the bottom of the spud and goes through a pulley at the deck of the barge to a winch. When the cable is winched in the spud is lifted clear of the bottom and the barge is free to move. When the cable is let out the spud lowers and buries itself in the bottom acting as an anchor. Because the spud and barge are not rigidly connected to eachother the barge can move up and down on the spud with the tides.

    There have been a couple of incidents in the gulf where the spud was not properly secured and dropped unexpectedly, rupturing undersea pipelines. The odds on that seem incredible, but it's happened a couple of times I'm aware of.
     
  12. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    I've seen the same as Cthippo and would suggest another mechanism, which is used on a lift barge (with spuds) that I really like:

    [​IMG]

    The lift spuds also are in "rings" welded outside the deck (not through the deck) and have huge linear teeth on them running the length. There is a hydraulic lift mechanism that turns cogs that move the spuds in either direction, lifting the barge many feet in the air.
     
  13. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 3,003
    Likes: 329, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Murphy's law . . . . . :eek:

    Cheers,
    Angel
     

  14. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
    Posts: 1,743
    Likes: 127, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 851
    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    The picture showing a crane barge with 2 spuds on one end is for construction, not pipe laying.
    Better to put spud wells at all 4 corners, and in use, one spud aft and one spud forward, both on same side. Better longitudinal stability.
    Pipe laying barge normally has a pipe carrying material barge alongside spudded side, stacked with pipe. Pipe is swung into position on deck, chamfered and welded to existing pipe. then lay barge shifted ahead. There is a big rubber tired brake with rollers that maintains tension on pipeline, so weight of pipeline doesn't drag if off of barge. Shiftimg is normally done with 9 anchors. Spread of 2 from each corner, and 1 more abeam amidship on up current or windward side.

    Spuds need be sufficiently strong to hold not only lay barge, but pipe laden material barge, and the tug landing and taking material barges away.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.