How to design a hull

Discussion in 'Software' started by Mojito, Nov 23, 2008.

  1. Mojito
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Mojito Junior Member

    I m a Naval Architecture And Marine Technology student who is in his second year.I started to learn Rhinoceros by watching tutorials and reading some informations.

    The problem is i must start to learn hull modelling but i cannot find any video tutorials or some information to read about that. How can i start and where can i start to learn. Please give some advice to me .... Thanks everyone
     
  2. pavel915
    Joined: Nov 2006
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    pavel915 Senior Member

    no video tutorial is needed i think for this easy work.
    You can model a hull simply lofting the sectional curves (curves of the body plan).
    Keep the sectional curves in the appropiate possition, you can import the curves from autocad or can draw the curves in rhino. Then simply loft.

    THis is a simple case; but for modelling a particular hull; some specaill cases arises. Try the simple one frist.
     
  3. pavel915
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    pavel915 Senior Member

    I think , before going to any particular work like "hull modelling" in rhino; you should first learn the basic of the software.
     
  4. ekamarine
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    ekamarine Junior Member

    If you ask my opinion, you better start with designing some simple stuff. Check out your room and find something simple to draw such as a cdplayer, a table lamb etc. First of all, you need to learn the basics. Drawing some simple 3D objects lets you get familiar with the software...
     
  5. pavel915
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    pavel915 Senior Member

  6. Joe Petrich
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    Joe Petrich Designer

    All good ideas. As suggested, lofting sections works nicely. You can also start with a planar surface divided into about 5x7 control points and push and pull the points into the shape you want. If you are designing a simple developable surface planing boat you can draw the centerline profiles, chine and sheerline and sweep between them.

    Orca3D and RhinoMarine have some "quick start" hull models you can use to get started and they will help you learn but it is best to develop your own hulls rather than rely on these "crutches".

    In all cases you should know the properties of the materials you will be using so you do not design a boat which is impossible to build.
     
  7. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Another consideration is if you have an open design brief or if you are required to hit a design point (tonnage, length, beam, TEU, etc.). You approach the problem differently.

    I start with a displacement/volume to length curve for the speed-length or transport volume I want/am given. This gives a midship section within beam and draft restrictions based upon standard types (cargo, combatant, speedboat, sail boat, etc.). The Lwl to speed places the midship location then I put in a few waterlines, diagonals and a profile. Then the cross-checking of stations/waterlines/diagonals to the displacement-length curve goes through a few cycles as I put in some control points and begin my weights. Cycle and repeat until structure, decks, weights, powering, and prime mover are pretty settled. Then I mesh the shell.

    You just can't sit down and start drawing a hull and expect it to all work out in the end. You have to start with the intended design goal.
     
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  8. ROO
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    ROO Junior Member

    Mojito,
    your in a simular position I was some years ago,
    Which software do I use?

    1, which software can I afford
    2, which one should I invest considerable amount of my time thats most
    likely to be used in a marine design office.
    3, ask your self why, if designing ships or boats in Rhino is straight forward
    why did someone invest time and money in developing RhinoMarine plugins, because its not easy.
    4, It takes years to master 3D software, marine or other wise.

    Mojito you have a long and painfull journey ahead of you, I can only think of one way out and its only a temporary short cut but it will give you plenty of hulls to choose from and the hydrostatics to go with them, whim me
     
  9. ROO
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    ROO Junior Member

    Mojito,
    this hull took me about 2 minutes, form this hull you can make many others, and they can be transfered into out of Rhino with ease into any other 3D program.
     

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  10. hunny06
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    hunny06 Junior Member

    Actually i don't know about that but i searched it for you so hope it ll helpful for you..

    [​IMG]
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    Round-bottom hull,"V" bottoms

    The round-bottom boat has mostly a displacement hull and is usually used for dinghies, tenders, and some car-top boats. This boat style is usually easier to maneuver at slow speeds than the flat-bottom boat.

    The "V"-bottom boat is probably the most common hull design. Most manufacturers of boats built today use modifications of this design. This design offers a good ride in rough water as the pointed bow slices forward and the "V"-shaped bottom softens the up-and-down movement of the boat. The degree of the angle of the "V" is called "deadrise." As the "V" shape extends to the back of the boat, it usually flattens out until it all but disappears at the transom. Some "V"-bottom boats have a flat surface at the very bottom called a "pad." This pad allows a little more planing surface and at the sacrifice of a little softness in the ride, but this addition increases top speed.

    Web design

    Web Design New York
     
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