How to design a diesel engine?

Discussion in 'DIY Marinizing' started by arvi, Jan 17, 2006.

  1. arvi
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    arvi New Member

    I am supposed to find information on how to design a diesel engine for a small fishing boats. i need articles or papers or procedures in engine designing. Effective horsepower is 15hp. i have to design the gearing and shafting. but prior to that, i wish to see how an engine drawing look. Right now, I have a very vague picture on how to start designing or drawing. help is very much needed. Thank you.
     
  2. zerogara
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    zerogara build it and sail it

    Not that hard actually, just sketch it out in your kitchen table and built it. I'm sure it will work!

    Are you serious? You've never seen a drawing but you want to design an engine and transmission.
     
  3. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Now I understand how it saves American companies so much money to outsource. :) Sam
     
  4. arvi
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    arvi New Member

    How to design diesel engine

    I have stated the wrong terms actually. I have seen many engine drawings but not much systems drawings. What I need is a propulsion system drawing using diesel for a small fishing vessel. This is actually my undergraduate final year project. So, comparing to most of you, my knowledge on this would be quite shallow. I need some systems drawings of the propulsion system and the transmission for validation and a better view since my sources in my university is quite limited.
     
  5. zerogara
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    zerogara build it and sail it

  6. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Arvi, these first two sites...
    http://www.fao.org/documents/show_cdr.asp?url_file=/docrep/007/ad944e/ad944e00.htm

    ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/field/006/ad531e/ad531e00.pdf
    are from here...
    (This won't print out. To get it, put "engines" in the search box in the next site)
    which in turn is from here...
    http://www.fao.org/fi/default.asp
    which all started from here...
    http://www.fao.org/
    There is a real lack of what you are looking for. Possibly you could go down to a harbor or a boat repair place and look at actual installations and get more information. Sam
     
  7. arvi
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    arvi New Member

    Thank you, sam & zerogara

    I have been looking for much information but most of them are outdated. During my proposal presentation, my topic was highlighted as not a good one and the argument was that it was better to use gasoline engines since the advantage of a diesel is just fuel economy . Well, I proceeded despite warnings and i have few research papers on this and being a female, it seems slightly harder and got much harder since I can't get the most optimized route. The sites you introduced was indeed very helpful but i know i still need more. I can take off from here and I will ask you both if with any doubts Thank you very, very much. Thank you and lastly, what do you think ? Can this project be successful? Right now, I am concentrating on just one plus point , fuel economy.:) :) :) :)
     
  8. Sander Rave
    Joined: May 2005
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    Sander Rave Senior Member

    How about low RPM torque and the better abillity to work on static revs?
    ...and what's wrong about fuel economy, it has my interrest!
     
  9. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    I believe they run a LOT longer between overhauls. One of the biggest advantages is safety as the explosion and fire hazard is a LOT lower.
     
  10. Sander Rave
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    Sander Rave Senior Member

    Exactly SamSam
    Less explosion hazzard, when collecting gas in tank, bilge or any other place when not vented well.
    Diesel engine is more expensive to buy if you look at the same power production.
    Diesels weight more at same power.
    Diesel needs a heavier battery to start
    Diesel engines last longer, less service
    They are more efficient on less then calculated power
    They smell more
     
  11. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    marshmat Senior Member

    Look at actual boats over the years- diesel has come to thoroughly dominate most boat classes. Speedboats are still usually gas; anything with outboards is usually gas; some cabin cruisers that will never see the open sea are gas, as are some sailboats that don't use the motor much. Most serious working and cruising powerboats run diesel- it's more efficient, more reliable, and safer. The extra weight is often not a huge concern.
    At 15 hp, you are usually in small gas engine territory. There are not many diesels this size; most 15hp motors are 1 or 2 cylinders and a one-cylinder diesel is not a nice machine to live with. But there are many designed for sailboats or stationary applications that are suitable. Unless you are required to design all-new equipment, I suggest looking up Yanmar, Deere, etc and seeing what they make that might be suitable. All the parts you need, except for possibly some mounting brackets, should be readily available.
     
  12. arvi
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    arvi New Member

    Thank you

    Thank you everyone. Most appreciated. I was asked to choose between an outboard or an inboard. i have found for dealkers for inboards and four dealers for outboards but while i was doing this, i found another engine installation method where the inboard is made into an outboard using motor mounting option with its propeller shaft fron the transom into the water. What do you know about this?
     
  13. marshmat
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    marshmat Senior Member

    Simple answer: If the boat planes, gas outboard. If it doesn't, diesel or gas inboard. At least, that's the case with virtually all production boats using 15 hp.
    Converting a diesel inboard into an outboard as you describe is not usually done, if I read you correctly.
     
  14. CrescentEngine
    Joined: Dec 2011
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    CrescentEngine New Member

    Dear Arvi,
    Which university are you at?
    Diesel engines are generally used in large configurations, like trucks, ships, power houses, etc. There is some research to make a smaller diesel, but it is generally academic. only Fiat came up with a diesel in a very small car.
    However, in the high-torque low rpm range, one can find the agricultural engines, nicknamed peter engines. They are noisy and dirty. You can hear them from the farms as you drive through the countryside!
    If your project is a transmission system, use any petrol 2 stroke engine and any boat and get on with your work.
    If your project is to design a diesel engine, then forget about the boat, and get back to me.
     

  15. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    CrescentE,

    Please note the date on the post you've responded to: February 2006.

    That's ~6 years ago now...

    -Tom
     
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