How to Design a Boat By John Teale

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by blackdaisies, Oct 24, 2008.

  1. blackdaisies
    Joined: Sep 2008
    Posts: 136
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Tennessee

    blackdaisies Senior Member

    Does anyone have any info on this book? I just bought it used off of Abebooks and it sounds informative. Even just a reader looking to learn more safety might benefit from reading it.

    It would definitely explain the weight disbursement and the sail rigs and techniques. I hope they include information on the crab claw sail. That is the whole point of buying the book, to make a boat with that type of sail. You don't see any trailer micro cruise sailors with that type of rig. I didn't even find too many plans, mostly day open deck sailors, if any at all.

    If anyone has any info, it would be appreciated.
     
  2. Jimboat
    Joined: Feb 2002
    Posts: 245
    Likes: 14, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 130
    Location: Canada

    Jimboat Senior Member

    John Teale does a great job of explaining boat design in technical but simplistic terms. All of his books are excellent reads!
     
  3. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 2,303
    Likes: 185, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2281
    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    The Crab Claw is not exactly mainstream, it's not mentioned in Teale's book as far as I know, he barely touches on rig design. I believe there was a book published years ago on Polynesian voyaging canoes. The technical side of the Crab Claw sail is discussed by Tony Marchaj in his book, Sail Performance. But that discussion does not tell you how to design one.

    Ted Brewer's book has some decent discussion on rig choice. Teale's has merit only as a very basic overview of small boat design. I dislike it mostly because the drawings have no soul (art) and are (to my eye) ugly. Strictly a personal problem.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. blackdaisies
    Joined: Sep 2008
    Posts: 136
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Tennessee

    blackdaisies Senior Member

    The mast for a crab claw sail is usually centered, so that is all I need. What I assume it says is that you have formulas for sail making under water area times 7 to make the size of a sail, displacement for the weight of the mast, so it's not that important on the rigs, but where the mast is placed so it will fit correctly in the displacement.

    That's what I'm hoping. Keels and how and which one will work, I hope that's what it says. I'm waiting for the book, so when it gets here, I should know. I'll look for a Polynesian sail book, so I'll have it ready, but it should mention something about masts in it too. I clearly cannot use a cat boat mast for this boat because their mast is set to the very front.

    Thanks for the replies. I was hoping to know what was in it. I wonder does it go into concrete building or not?
     
  5. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 2,303
    Likes: 185, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2281
    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    He does mention that it's possible.....
     
  6. blackdaisies
    Joined: Sep 2008
    Posts: 136
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Tennessee

    blackdaisies Senior Member

    they will ask the weight of the material to build with though, so it might be calculated into the plans. I'll have get a book on ferro concrete building. I was going to do that, but all that I read about keels, displacement, and mast types, I gave up, but that will be another book to buy. It couldn't hurt.
     
  7. blackdaisies
    Joined: Sep 2008
    Posts: 136
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Tennessee

    blackdaisies Senior Member

    I got my book today! I does have information on how to design with ferro concrete, so maybe you looked it up under concrete boats. It doesn't have a lot of directions on how to build with it, which is not what I bought the book for, but it clearly includes weights and information on how to design concrete ferro boat construction methods.

    I'm happy with it, but I hope I can get some use out of it. I'll be looking it over and getting some reading from it. If nothing else, it will help in selecting a good boat to buy. Knowing what characteristics a boat should have what it can be used for is worth reading the book.

    I misunderstood gpr to be ferro crete, but the book says it's two different methods, gpr being fiber glass.
     

  8. blackdaisies
    Joined: Sep 2008
    Posts: 136
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Tennessee

    blackdaisies Senior Member

    A design for a monohull, instead of a multihull, with crab claw sails, I'll start with this:

    Loa: 15 feet

    Freeboard at 3 feet? I want to make it into a cabin boat, so I want high sides.

    bow and aft Freeboard: 4 feet, for a double ender

    Sheer curve: 1 foot

    Bwl: 3.6

    The block coefficient I can't use without knowing what it is going to weigh, but the formula looks like this.

    weight of hull= woh, I don't know yet, this isn't the correct term, but I don't have a triangle on my keyboard or the commands to know how to type it from the keyboards

    woh x 35/(13(Lwl) x 3.6 (bwl) x D (depth) = Cb This is the symbol for the Block Coefficient

    This is good, so I'll add as I go. I'll have to start researching what goes on a boat.

    toilet
    bed
    small camping stove
    emergency radios
    sails
    sail masts
    ballast
    keels
    boat hull with cabin
    supplies
    At least one person, but two just for day sailing

    What requirements are there other thaan a radio?

    The compass I would say is part of my supplies, but there may be a lot of little navigation supplies I may have to list to make sure I can find my way home.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.