How should i restore it? What wood? what should i use to seal the bottom?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by B man, Feb 10, 2011.

  1. Bruce46
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    Bruce46 Junior Member

    Paul
    The Grizzly Grip also comes in a nontextured version that they reccomend for canoes. Don't know how long it would last, just thought it was worth a mention.
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yep, I know Bruce, I'm familiar with the product. Most of these type of truck bed formulations (low cyanoacetate activator), can be had with or without the nuggets of texture. Many of them lose a considerable amount of abrasion resistance without the filler materials.
     
  3. CaptBill
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    CaptBill CaptBill

    Grizzly grip inside and Aluthane exterior would be a good combination. Grizzly grip to thicken plus sound/vibration dampening. Aluthane for a slicker finish. You should plan on doing both sides either way, for best sealing.
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Bill, I'm not sure of your idea of sealing, but none of the coatings you've mentioned will work for very long, so considering their price and application, maybe the best approach as a real repair as opposed to a band-aid.
     
  5. CaptBill
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    CaptBill CaptBill

    When did I ever suggest a band-aid as opposed to a good repair? any of the methods i have suggested will result in a SUPERIOR repair. Better than new. Success merely depends on applying enough coats to seal it all in....I have been in the coatings business 27 years. I can say I have a decent understanding of what are the possibilities.
     
  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It's shear lunacy to suggest, that a low cyanoacetate truck bed liner is a superior repair. I've been involved with industry tests on these products for some time mow and you're just talking out your butt. Yea, lets just dip everything in a drum of polyurethane, that'll fix it! You're ridiculous.
     
  7. CaptBill
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    CaptBill CaptBill

    What is crazy to suggest is that you are going to fix an old boat like this with any other method. When you encapsulate a surface and add wall thickness, on both sides, you are building on a mechanical layer.... Otherwise, you know as well as I, the only value of this boat is scrap metal. Nobody wants to hear that...

    The REAL question is this....Why is it that they are not doing this AT THE FACTORY TO BEGIN WITH? Seriously! They sold a 'good enough for a couple of years' boat.He would be to busy chasing fish around the lake had you finished it right from the start!

    But nooooooo... Can't have rif raf like painters involved. They arn't worth ****.
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You clearly don't have an understanding of the issues here. The boat is leaking because the fasteners have "circled" loose and eaten away the metal on the sides of the fasteners, under the heads of the fasteners and egged out the holes the fasteners go through. Your goo sandwich doesn't have have sufficient modulus to restrain the movement of all the elements, fill that gaps and resist shear loading on these moving pieces, plus provide the film elongation necessary, to insure it stays where you want it. In short, you're kidding yourself and can't support your opinion with data. Though on the other hand I can show you precisely how much shear load and peel strength this films generally have, how much you can expect in regard to modulus, compression, elongation, hardness, you name it.

    The reason they're not doing it at the factory is they don't need to, nor is it desirable to make a perfectly repairable boat, capable of lasting many decades any more difficult to build or repair, not to mention cost and additional weight of two 30 mil plus coatings of expensive polyurethane. The looks of the boat suggests it's from the 1970's possably the 1960's. So how long do you think it should last before some fasteners need to be renewed, Bill? A half a century isn't good enough for you . . .
     
  9. Bruce46
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    Bruce46 Junior Member

    Ah heck! Pretend it is an old wood boat and glass it. Epoxy fixes anything.
    Happy Valentines Day.
     

  10. CaptBill
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    CaptBill CaptBill

    PAR, my point is there is no hope any other way. Your points are all good ones and to be considered. All fastener holes must be addressed during prep, of coarse. CHOICE of epoxy is key as well. Want a flexible grade goo that can handle the flex well. Many things to consider to be sure. You must admit though, this is the BEST HOPE, to go the coating route. It is a tall order to fix an old hull like this one, for sure. But kidding myself? We are talking about 'building' a composite hull using the original 50+ year old aluminum hull as the form, in reality.

    I was exaggerating a bit suggesting that it should have been done at the factory. The technique I am speaking of was not nearly as possible back then (for the reasons you cite). Coating technology has come a long way since then making this a feasible possibility. And you must admit, if successfully done, is the hot ticket. Should last 100 years. Now it's one piece, no fasteners.

    That said, I would even consider 'coal tar epoxy' as a possibility. Has amazing flex properties an sticks well (and lowest cost epoxy route). Or the super-flexible grade epoxies as even a better alternative to coal-tar epoxy.

    The whole problem with your definition of 'repairable' is suspect because when the time comes for repairs we hear the familiar old song and dance why it is 'just not worth it. Just buy new'. The man probably just wants a safe boat to chase some fish without taking a second mortgage out.
     
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