How Rare Is This Setup ?

Discussion in 'Gas Engines' started by wooky, Dec 23, 2007.

  1. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Jango is correct and unfortunately I've actually seen bodies flying through the air as a result of these types of explosions.

    Which is why I usually go on a rant when folks come on the board as say things like "when I was younger we did this all the time" or "we use straight auto parts for all our marine assemblies and have no problems" etc. These people clearly are talking out their asses or haven't a clue, because once you see the bodies flying through the air, it kind of takes all the wind out of your argument.
     
  2. martinf
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: washington state

    martinf Junior Member

    Thanks guys,
    The reason I ask is that I'm purchasing an old WWII boat that has a pair of Chrystler straight 8's (Royals). They have 2 carter carbs on each and I just assumed that they were standard carbs, but perhaps they are marine-specific? (based on what you said). It just never occured to me that they did anything different where the throttle plate bushings, etc. are, but it sure makes sense.
    Just another reason why I'm leaning on re-powering it to some 371 detroit diesels. I don't want to flinch every time I turn the key (even with first running a blower). And speaking of, what about those blowers? I assume that any blower that's old is a standard dc motor with an armature and brushes that spark ocassionally....
    ~martin
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The old marine blower motors would have had a "spark arresting" screen installed around the commutator end of the motor, preventing sparks from escaping.

    Restoring a vintage engine has to be justified somehow. An old Packard 12 or other valuable engine is easy to quantify, especially in a full up restoration, where the authentic engine(s) is desired. Given a choice, modern engines are far and away better suited. Parts availability, reparability, etc. can make the selection easy at times.

    Unless you have a desire for those old Royals, then you're much better off with a newer, easier to live with set of engines.
     
  4. wooky
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: Atlanta Area

    wooky Junior Member

    Can You Say BOOOM ?

    Yes, fumes are a concern because of the nature of gasoline, even though I have a bilge blower and the "air scoops" (don't know what the things are called, one faces forward the other rearward). The 3 times I took the boat out I didn't have the doghouse (engine cover) mounted but ran the blower anyway (good habit to get into). Judging from what information I have now, it seems that the previous owner of my engine installed an automotive carb, the vent doesn't turn back down onto the carb. This will be remedied before I take it out again, after completing the repairs to the hull (transom wood, stringers, sole-deck). After this fairly complete overhaul I should have a virually new boat that will last another 30+ years, and the best part is since I'm doing the work myself I'm estimating that I'll have less than 3 or 4 grand in it total.
     
  5. martinf
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: washington state

    martinf Junior Member

    Yep, that's true. I definately do have an engine worth restoring--an old Sterling Petrel with hardly any hours...doesn't really even need restoring--but these Royals are so much more common, I'm gathering. But, they came with a pallet full of new parts and I'll probably keep them for a while until I see what the fuel consumption rate is. They're pushing 54" props so it can't be very good!

    ~martin
     
  6. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: Melbourne/Singapore/Italy

    powerabout Senior Member

    I remember working in a few when I was an an apprentice in the late 70's so they made it to Australia as did cars with them but I did grow up in an old marina and we had stuff there that was created since boating began..
    Chrysler sterndrives with actual Chrysler legs
    V4 OMC sterndrives
    direct reverser Mercs
    50hp V4 Evinrudes
    MerCrusiers that you could wind the leg up sideways with a crank handle inside the boat.
    MerCrusiers first diesel
    MerCruiser with 409 Chevs

    Here's the question of the day.
    who can name the only 2 Mercruisers that came with twin carbs..
    although 20 years apart( you will need to include performace stuff for one answer)
     
  7. tom kane
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Hamilton.New Zealand.

    tom kane Senior Member

    Chrysler slant six`es usualy had the carb sitting on a cast set of ram tubes which helps increase torque.The starting point of ram tubes fitted to modern autos.Long ram tubes for low end torque and short tubes for high RPM torque.
     
  8. george allard
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: kentucky

    george allard Junior Member

    I saw a 1960s houseboat, about 40 footer, with twin 225 Chrysler's. The old thing had been completely restored and looked sharp.
     
  9. BHOFM
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    Location: usa

    BHOFM Senior Member

    I worked at an engine shop in the mid seventy's and we
    did several of the engines, I think the marine engine
    is a bit different than the car and truck version, I think
    it had screw in core plugs for one thing and the distributer
    hole was bigger, or something, that was a long time ago!
     
  10. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: Melbourne/Singapore/Italy

    powerabout Senior Member

    How about left hand rotation Chris Craft chev V8s driving from the timing case end, a volvo sterndrive!
     
  11. 2850 Bounty
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    2850 Bounty Junior Member

    As many of us know, Chrysler at one time was big into Marine applications.
    They joined right in with the B/W style trans adaptation.

    Chrysler had an involvement with Volvo Penta early on as well.
    Chrysler even labeled a hull as being "Chrysler".... I worked on one (Chrysler Boat) this past summer.
    It used the Mopar 360 V-8 w/ the 280 drive.
    All of the drive, with exception to a Borg Warner adapter/drive coupler, was Volvo Penta w/ the Chrysler name on it.

    I'm not surprised to hear of the slant six being used back then.

    .
     
  12. forestfirepro
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: Richmond BC

    forestfirepro New Member

    M225 with Volvo 270

    Hey there,
    I have the same set up in a 19 1/2 foot Sangster. Chrysler M225 Slant 6.
    Wondering if any of you folks know where the zincs are on this engine?
    Thanks in advance.
    Aaron
     

  13. Chris Bretter
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: Durban

    Chris Bretter Zaphod

    hi Chrysler used a Badged Datsun SD22 motor at one time anyone heard of them
     
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