how much the mixing ratio between fiberglass resin and filler ?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by yaasaay, Jun 14, 2011.

  1. yaasaay
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 53
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: saudi arabia

    yaasaay Junior Member

    what I did

    just for experience I lied the fiberglass in the board then I paint it with epoxy


    (sorry I wasn't clear when I write "20% fiberglass" I meant fiberglass resin

    is it right fiberglass resin mean= epoxy?


    then I mixed 20% fiberglass resin with 80% filler

    I am sorry for this mistake
     
  2. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,875
    Likes: 311, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Ok, that is clearer, you are using Epoxy - but once again you havnt told us what sort of 'filler' you are using. All of those materials mentioned by Teddy Diver can be fillers. What are you using?

    Any cracking or shattering of filler depends on the type of filler. Wood Flour and sawdust tend to hold together better than say fine powdered fillers. But then, you dont get as fine , smooth finish with the wood products.

    The easiest way to determine the suitability, is to mix a small batch to determine how it will set, and then perhaps 'test' it with a hammer or similar method.

    Really, the only limit to the amount of filler is when it gets too dry from lack of liquid, and it stops mixing in the pot. How it stands up mechanically afterwards depends on what it is you use as the filler material.
     
  3. yaasaay
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 53
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: saudi arabia

    yaasaay Junior Member

    what do you mean by using Wood Flour or sawdust


    how?
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 489, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yaasaay, you clearly need to do some research, as your questions are of such a basic nature as to be nearly laughable at this point.

    After 31 separate posts, you haven't gotten any further along the understanding trail, suggesting you are very young, very inexperienced and also unwilling to preform some basic searches.

    Frankly, this is insulting and not worth the bother of hand holding a kid though the basics.

    On the other hand if you show even the remotest endeavor to educate yourself, then these attempts to gain some knowledge and information here, would be fruitful instead of discourteous to those interesting in helping.

    The first place to start is the Gougeon brother's book on boat building. It's an industry standard on epoxy use, though at this point I'm questioning if you even know what resin system you are using.

    [​IMG]

    It can be purchased at the book store here or your favorite book seller. Yea, it's old fashioned to actually read and turn pages, get over it . . .
     
  5. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 2,588
    Likes: 125, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1650
    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Believe it's also very much a language barrier. Also quite sure it's poly..
     
  6. yaasaay
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 53
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: saudi arabia

    yaasaay Junior Member

    I will buy this book
    also
    If I Don’t Ask I Don’t Get


    how do you want me to learn if I don't ask
     
  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 489, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Asking questions assumes you have some basic understanding of principles and techniques, both of which are easily obtainable. Asking for a dissertation on each process and not having a grasp on any part of these processes, is insulting and disrespectful. Simply put, you have a powerful tool here and elsewhere on the net, but you're not going to find what you need, without knowing what questions to ask. The only way to know what questions to ask, is to study the various subjects, develop a basic understanding of the concepts, principles and techniques, then formulate educated, knowledgeable, possably insightful questions about specific issues or problems you're encountering. That's when a place like this shines; in it's ability to offer advice, from multiple experience levels, to "dial in" your understanding.
     
  8. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
    Posts: 5,373
    Likes: 254, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3380
    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

  9. nukisen
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 440
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 124
    Location: Sweden

    nukisen Senior Member

    Yassay!
    All my knowledge about epoxy comes from this forum and internet at the same time as I have studied sellers recomendations. But I have fooling around this forum for two years. And now I am building a small boat with ribbed wood and epoxy. The more you learn the easier it is to build.

    I will also say it depends on wich grade you want to build and if you want it to look like a homemade boat or like a real proffesional building.

    At the same time I have very much respect for Par and Daiquiri as they are proffesionals.
    Their sugestions is always proffesional. And they never post rubbish.
    If I would build a bigger boat in this way I would definately obay their sugestions about the book.
     
  10. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,875
    Likes: 311, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    I am happy to explain.

    It is exactly like making pancakes.

    The dry 'filler' can be special fine plastic 'flour', or coarse sawdust that you get from sawing with a power saw, or fine 'wood flour', that you would get by using a belt sander on a bit of timber. It can also be specially ground hard material like concrete, for really hard wearing surfaces.

    Each 'filler' is be suitable for different purposes.

    Unlike pancake mix however, you combine the two parts of the resin ( epoxy and hardener) first, and mix them well with a stirring stick. You then start adding the 'filler' of choice, a little at a time, and keep stirring. This is oposite to adding milk and butter to a bowl of flour for pancakes.

    Depending on your purpose, you will want to keep adding filler until you get to
    1) Ketchup thickness ( usefull for joining two bits of wood )
    2) Peanut Butter thickness ( it wont run down vertical surfaces)

    the books that you read will not say what ratio to mix filler with, they will usually say what consistancy is required.

    This is where the books become useful, as they will give you specific examples of where to use what thickness of mixture.
     
  11. nukisen
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 440
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 124
    Location: Sweden

    nukisen Senior Member

    Hahahaha I just love the comparing to pancakes!
    But yes this is a good explanation. hehe
     
  12. gagepants
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 44
    Location: Massachusetts

    gagepants Junior Member

    I was just wondering yesterday about cheaper alternatives to all the various fillers and additives when I thought of regular old flour- has anyone actually tried it? How would it compare? Sure could save some cash!
     
  13. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 2,329
    Likes: 129, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1603
    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Yes... regular flour has been used, along with baby powder, powdered limestone and many other different fillers.
     

  14. yaasaay
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 53
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: saudi arabia

    yaasaay Junior Member

    rwatson thanks for your explanation

    I have really benefited

    I am happy to see this receptiveness from you

    Thanks
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.