How important are sails?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Bqman, Mar 11, 2007.

  1. Bqman
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Location: Huntsville, AL

    Bqman Junior Member

    I know this question may seem ridiculous, but I just looked at a 1971 South Coast 22 and the boat is in excellent condition. It has all new wood in the interior, the wires are re-done, fresh paint on the bottom and gel coat. It also has a custom double axle trailer. Pretty much, awesome. The main sail is above average but the jib has a couple of dime size holes in it and the residue from the sail tape used to patch up the holes. My question is, aside from an absence of an outboard motor and the holes in the jib, are those enough of a criteria to pass up a boat like this or should I just consider repairing the sail and purchasing a used outboard?
     
  2. DanishBagger
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    DanishBagger Never Again

    Well, if the boat are sound, and it merely needs a new jib, you can buy a new jib, there's not much to it.

    A new jib won't set you back so much. Heck, on a boat that size, you can even buy a used jib (for another boat) and resew it yourself.
     
  3. Capt. Mike
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    Location: St. Augustine, FL / Bahamas

    Capt. Mike Junior Member

    Used sails in servicable condition are readily available from a variety of sources. One of the best is Bacon and Associates in Annapolis. Here is a link: http://www.baconsails.com. We have dealt with Bacon several times and believe them to be reputable.

    A boat requires ongoing maintenance and repairs. When you buy a used boat, you simply jump into the repair cycle at some point. Add the cost of replacement sails and an outboard to the asking price and jump in if its a good deal.

    Mike
     
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  4. Bqman
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Bqman Junior Member

    Well he's willing to except $2500 maybe I can talk him down a little more.
     
  5. Mychael
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Mychael Mychael

    You could patch holes that size.

    Mychael
     
  6. Bqman
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    Bqman Junior Member

    What do you mean by that?
     
  7. Mychael
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    Location: Melbourne/Victoria/Australia.

    Mychael Mychael

    Patching holes? They don't sound too big to me. The adhesive patches work well if properly applied or you could take the sail to a loft and have the sailmaker do a proper job and stitch in patches. Personally I reckon that unless your competitive racing or planning a long voyage then use the sails you've got with running repairs till they are totally knackered.

    Mychael
     
  8. DanishBagger
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    DanishBagger Never Again

    He means, that with sail-tape or cloth, you could patch the holes, assuming they're not too big, and the rest of the sail aren't easy to rip or poke holes in.

    Nobody here can say wether 2500 is the right price for that boat, with the info we have.
     
  9. Mychael
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Melbourne/Victoria/Australia.

    Mychael Mychael

    I'll go out on a limb here and say (with due care but no responsibility) that it seems like an okay deal. FROM WHAT YOU DESCRIBE. As mentioned becuase none of us have x-ray vision we cannot tell what the boat is really like and I don't know that particular model so cannot comment on how they sail. Maybe someone else can give an opinion on that.
    Having said all that I'd consider it to be a good prospect.
    Good luck.

    Mychael
     

  10. tspeer
    Joined: Feb 2002
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    Location: Port Gamble, Washington, USA

    tspeer Senior Member

    Your question is kind of like asking, "How much are the tires on a used car worth?" Maybe a little, but don't expect much. Chances are, they're nearly bald.

    I don't consider the sails that come with a used boat (especially one that old) to be worth anything. I would plan on replacing the sails shortly after buying the boat. If you discover that the sails are adequate for your type of sailing, then that's a bonus - you've postponed the inevitable.

    I know this sounds harsh, but sails should be considered as having limited life, making them semi-expendable. Regular replacement is part of the cost of sailing, as surely as paying insurance or varnishing the brightwork.
     
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