How far out is classed as the ocean?

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by djwkd, Mar 22, 2007.

  1. Lancerbye
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    Lancerbye Junior Member

    Actually the earth being flat and all the only worries you should have is falling off the edge. I think that just before that happens you are probably looking at the ocean.
     
  2. Poida
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    Poida Senior Member

    The world is not flat it is dish shaped otherwise all of the water would cascade over the side. People think they are sailing around the world but they are simply travelling around the rim. Boats are designed like shopping trolleys they never go in a straight line.

    If boats do go over the edge a rediculous explanation like the Bermuda Triangle is used.

    Poida
     
  3. Verytricky
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    Verytricky Large Member

    There are only three oceans in the world, and, take one for an example: Indian ocean. If you are 1 foot into the sea in Mozambique you are in the ocean!

    Perhaps you want to determine when you stop being 'coastal' and are in 'Open Sea'

    Most recommendations for what equipment to carry on board is based on three loosely defined areas of water: Inland, Coastal and Open Sea. The definition of when coastal becomes open sea is when you loose sight of land.

    So I think perhaps the answer to your question is: When you loose sight of land.

    You just need to define your question a litle bit clearer..
     
  4. Lancerbye
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    Lancerbye Junior Member

    What if you have very bad eyesight and you lose sight of land 2 miles out? I prefer Poida's explanation. we will just keep going around the rim and try not to fall off. Oops.
     
  5. djwkd
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    djwkd Senior Member

    Thats not true in england-we don't have whales for hundred's of miles,not in the north sea (our 'ocean' where we are-but not so far in)
     
  6. djwkd
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    djwkd Senior Member


    a piece of rope is more than one piece of string in one piece of material (spliced or twined together)


    thats what i would say!
     
  7. djwkd
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    djwkd Senior Member

    that was exactly what i was looking for-that means 12 miles out (i do know quite a bit of science...)
     
  8. ALowell
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    ALowell Junior Member



    I think he's hit the nail on the head. Are we all agreed then?

    Just out of curiosity, where do you find this definition? I don't think I've encountered it in USCG regs.

    ~ ALowell
     
  9. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Great so when you loose sight of land is the 'official' time you hit the Ocean! so If your on a 15 foot speed boat your horizon is about 2 to 3 miles, if your leaving a low level of land with say a horizon of 12 miles you could be in the Ocean at 15 miles?! On the other hand of your on the bridge of a very large cruise ship with some 15 decks and your like 60 foot in the air your horizon is say 18 miles, from the same piece of land YOU dont get to the ocean until your 30 miles out - twice the distance that the speedboat is? something not right here!!

    As I said earlier "look what it sez on the tin" I.e. if your map sez your in an ocean your in the bloody ocean, if it sez your in a sea your in the sea! Simple and easy - best not use that system then!
     
  10. Crag Cay
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    Crag Cay Senior Member

    If you are need the definition for any official or legal purpose, I'm afraid it's more complicated than that. Can you tell us why you need to know and maybe we can point you towards the relevent publication?

    I thought initially it was just a general discussion, but even so there are certainly more than three of them by any definition!
     
  11. Mychael
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    Mychael Mychael

    Gee and I thought "open sea" was just when they left the roof open.

    Mychael
     
  12. ALowell
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    ALowell Junior Member

    I've been following this thread long enough to have worked up an appetite for a REAL definition. Tell us what the defs are - at this point I want to know them all so I can impress the women.:cool:


    ~ ALowell
     
  13. charmc
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    charmc Senior Member

    "Great so when you loose sight of land is the 'official' time you hit the Ocean! so If your on a 15 foot speed boat your horizon is about 2 to 3 miles, if your leaving a low level of land with say a horizon of 12 miles you could be in the Ocean at 15 miles?! On the other hand of your on the bridge of a very large cruise ship with some 15 decks and your like 60 foot in the air your horizon is say 18 miles, from the same piece of land YOU dont get to the ocean until your 30 miles out - twice the distance that the speedboat is? something not right here!!"

    Yes, and if the coast has mountains with a height of 1500 meters, your speedboat guy would not be in the ocean until maybe 30 miles, perhaps 32 miles if he has a center console stand up helm, on the other hand, if it's a VLCC fully loaded, the bridge will be 10-12 meters lower than if it's returning empty, in which case the point of reaching the ocean if the coast was flat would be....., but if the coast had those mountains and you were on the VLCC bridge, fully loaded, and you passed the cruise ship, one of you would be in the ocean, and the other would still be in coastal waters, although you're passing close by...., then the pilot boat shows up, with a helm about 2-3 meters above the water..... Oh, crap, my head hurts, I'm leaving to go have a beer.

    Cheers,

    Charlie
     
  14. charmc
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    charmc Senior Member

    Verytricky,

    I have to ask: are you bragging??
     

  15. Poida
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    Poida Senior Member

    Then of course there is the large swell.
    I'm in the ocean, no I'm not. I'm in the ocean, no I'm not.

    Poida
     
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