how can I make a canoe stable ?

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by yaasaay, Aug 19, 2011.

  1. yaasaay
    Joined: May 2011
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    Location: saudi arabia

    yaasaay Junior Member

    hi guys

    finally I finished my first boat and I have tested it

    I am surprised the boat is heavy but float with ease

    there is no any leaking but there is one problem it is difficult to be stable

    can you tell me guys how can I make it more stable

    because any movement I have made it can swing the boat

    this is picture for my boat
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    Hi Yas,
    she looks good! :D

    I can think of a couple suggestions.
    having had similar concerns myself.
    a: lower your seat
    b: move seat more centre (or sit on your knees in the centre)
    c: add weight to the front (more of an even waterline say...)
    d: out riggers?

    just some ideas,
    regards,

    DE
     
  3. yaasaay
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    yaasaay Junior Member

    thanks Dirteater


    do you think if I add outriggers can solve the problem
     
  4. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    Hi yassay,

    I'm not clear as to exactly why it feels unstable,
    however due to the narrowness of a canoe you body weight can't be too
    high up. When I had my Canoe I felt best kneeling in the boat a little back from center, when I wasn't tandem. Out Riggers certainly could help and there are a couple styles you could look into. There are short smaller outriggers that you often see being used on Canoes that sail (but may interfiere with paddling. The other type is the kind you see like on the old Hawia 5 0 shows. you know...
    they extend quite a bit out from the side of the canoe and are more like pontoons really. Often seen used off the coastal beaches where the waters may be more rough. I dont' know if this would be suitable for your area or not. Perhaps its a matter of getting used to the canoe as well. Often shorter boats tend to feel a little more "tender" (tippy).

    Have you tipped it yet? My wife loved to tip the canoe on hot days on a lake!
    we got real good a getting in and out of it. It also gives you a real good idea of how the canoe handles after you've tipped it on purpose a few times. I know that might sound a little strange but it really does help a person get to know the boat better. so that might help too. I hope this helps yassay.
    well wishes,
    DE
     
  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It probably handles like canoes do. The instability is normal. Kneeling makes a huge difference. The seats were a modification in the 1890s to make them more attractive to westerners; particularly ladies. Remember: don't grab the gunwales or you will capsize.
     
  6. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    I think Gonzo's right here,
    I think that,s one of the things with any small craft.
    We have to sacrifice somethings for others
    ie: stability for speed or weight or manoverability,
    we also think about where we plan on using our boats and how
    we are going to get them there. ie: can we car top it.
    then there's the issue of storage.

    I guess my point here is all though you may find
    the canoe a little tender, there are also many plus's
    to take into account that you may be over looking.
    i'm not a fan of portaging but if I had to, I probably
    wish I had your canoe :)
     
  7. yaasaay
    Joined: May 2011
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    yaasaay Junior Member

    why

    I thought gunwales just to make it stronger

    guys can you tell about ( outriggers float ) I want to make it but I don't know the idea if I made it just a piece of wood that help or should be there Cavity
     
  8. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    First, try kneeling (on your knees) on the bottom of the boat with your bum resting against the front rail of the seat. This is the most stable position in a canoe. Also, place your paddle across the gunwales with one hand in the middle but don't put too much weight here, keep your weight low, on your knees.

    -Tom
     
  9. FMS
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    FMS Senior Member

    Agree with the others. Before you start designing outriggers, have you actually tipped it yet? I'd take it in safe water, say 4' or 4 1/2' deep with a nice sandy bottom. Don't have anything in the boat to fall out or get wet and wear a swimsuit. Then really tip it and find the limits. You may find after playing with it like a kid for an hour you become a lot more confident in it than before.
     
  10. yaasaay
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    yaasaay Junior Member

    please can you show me a picture for the correct knee position it is difficult to understand that just from words
     
  11. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Lots of good 'how to videos' in you tube

    eg

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3XIWpEn3_Y

    Canoes feel tippy, but its amazing how little you actually fall out.

    I make all new paddlers sit down and purposely rock the boat from side to side by moving their hips ( like a hula hoop). Once you get the 'feel' of how far the boat will tip while you can stay upright, just by bending your hips, you realise that the craft a really a lot more stable than they seem.
     
  12. yaasaay
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    yaasaay Junior Member

    thanks rwatson


    really I did't install knees but after I watch this video and a few of videos I understand why it's important and I see the way of paddle

    after I install it what I do
     
  13. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    The knees on your legs. Kneel on the boat floor to lower your centre of gravity resulting in improved stability. Rest your buttocks against the front of the seat (don't sit on it).

    Try laying down in the canoe! That makes them very stable!

    -Tom
     
  14. yaasaay
    Joined: May 2011
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    yaasaay Junior Member

    I will do it Tom but it will take a time may be 2 to 3 days or more because I don't have a chisel tool or machine that can chisel
     

  15. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    You don't need any tools my friend. Don't sit on the seat but go down onto your knees on the floor of the canoe in front of the seat. Hell, you can even sit on the floor if you like.

    Would someone who knows how to do graphics on here draw this poor sole a picture?

    -Tom
     
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