how about stretching a Bolger light dory to 20', same beam.

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Squidly-Diddly, Sep 29, 2011.

  1. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I'm hoping for dory utility, but less hobby horsing w/sliding seat, and space for second rower or passenger, and generally built more for speed and cruising.

    What would happen if I just stretched the 15' BLDory to 20' with software?

    I just got a 21'+long two car garage to myself all nice and attached to the heated house, with nice glass smooth concrete floor, nice smooth concrete parking out in front, and a nice 12'x40' side-yard, with no complaining neighbors.

    Apparently, my land-lord doesn't grasp the value of an empty garage and is just giving it away for FREE!

    Plus I'm only going to college evenings, and have small but comfortable residual income and savings.

    I'm forcing myself to finish a few un-boat related projects first, after that, who knows.

    Maybe a 20' Skin-on-frame rowing shell/skiff/Whitehall, or a stitch&glue elongated dory.

    I'd even have space left over to do a "study" butchering of a PWC derelict hulk for the addition of the motorcycle components. I figure changing out the one water jet for two on either side of the wheel would be challenging to bring to completion, but I could at least make a disposable 'roller' with savaged motorcycle running gear even if not powered just to check the feel of the handling coasting down a gentle slope to see if anyone gets interested.
     
  2. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    The Banks style dory was most appropriate for its intended purpose. They are salty looking and generally pleasant to contemplate. Simplicity is one of the crowning virtues. BUT that kind of dory is neither speedy nor comfortable as a cruising boat. In their purest form they were stable boats only when heavily loaded with cod fish or whatever.

    If you stretch the Bolger 15 footer to 20 feet it will still float, might have too much rocker, will have an extra ply splice, will have more wetted surface and be heavier, needs a longer trailer, and a few other reasons for not building a 20 footer to that design.

    The Atkins have a dory design in that size range 20'-11". It is called Pemaquid. It has a small lug sail and a 6HP Palmer engine. It also has a full length keel with 225 pounds of lead ballast. Pemaquid is a wholesome boat that might be fun to use.

    There are still a few dories operating in the maritimes. Way back in the day, John Gardner did extensive coverage of the type in his tabloid; National Fisherman. I believe some of the most discussed iterations were called St. Pierre et Miquelain types. (Viking North please help me with the correct spelling) They sported make and break engines, of the Lunenburg variety. They were cheap to build and as rugged as the men who used them. But these were real work boats and not objects for casual play.
     
  3. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Bolger's light dory is similar to a Bank dory in shape, but was designed for recreational use. It is not the most stable small boat but is entirely usable with a little care, rows well and behaves nicely in rough water.

    If you stretch the dory in length only the rocker won't increase. The displacement for the same waterline will increase by the ratio of the length change.

    Different type of boat. SD says he's looking for a boat to use with a sliding seat. I assume he wants a light boat for recreational rowing. The Atkins design with a very heavy 6HP engine and 225 lbs of lead is a much heavier boat. Probably well suited for what it was designed for, but not for recreational rowing with a sliding seat.

    Again, different types of boats. And the St Pierre at 26 feet longclose to 8' beam is a very big boat.
     
  4. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    here is 18' dory for sale, with what looks like stern mounted 6hp outboard.

    http://sfbay.craigslist.org/sby/boa/2615114191.html

    I never understood what was the problem with adding an extra bracket (even if it needs to be a "Z" or something to clamp onto the highly sloped stern of a dory, then get vertical for the outboard claps, so you don't have that goofy "box".

    I'd rather have an extra bracket, and one or even two tiller/throttle extensions than a "box" in the middle of the boat.

    Maybe I'm thinking about a stitch and glue slightly wide rowing shell, or outfitting a large Scanoe as sliding seat rower.

    Basically the fastest one-two person row boat able to carry some cargo or go duck hunting, etc.
     
  5. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

  6. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    Consider Sam Devlin's Oarling. Clickey.
     
  7. Easy Rider
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    Easy Rider Senior Member

    All suggested boats are way too heavy for Squid.
    A good boat would be the Odyssey 165 by Ron Rontilla. Go to:
    http://www.frontrower.com/catalog.htm.
    And I think Squid's idea of stretching the 15' Dory is fine. Stretching to 20' may not be necessary or desirable. For it's length the dory has a short WLL for it's OAL so would be limited if racing but should be very good for casual recreational rowing. If stretching is ok do it to Pixie, a 14' rowing boat by Atkin.
    http://www.atkinboatplans.com/Oar/Pixie.html But it appears to be a tandem boat already at only 14'. I have a 10' rowing boat that's super but it's only 10' long so not really a serious rowing boat. I should stretch IT.
     
  8. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Are you actually familiar with the double-ended gunning dory by Gardner that I recommended? Click on the link I provided, and take a look. It's pretty light. And it could be made even lighter with modern techniques, if Squid's comfortable doing taped and filleted seams.

    It's a 3/8" plywood version of the personal gunning dory that William Chamberlain, the famous dory builder, built for his own use. Chamberlain was an avid duck hunter.
     
  9. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

  10. brucehallman
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    brucehallman Junior Member

    Long Light Dory, Bolger design 526

    Bolger did a 19'6" stretch of the Light Dory, named #526, 'Long Light Dory'

    [​IMG]
     
  11. KJL38
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    KJL38 Junior Member

    I think the extreme overhangs of the Dory sacrifice waterline length which could be useful to increase top speed and reduce hobby horsing. Have you considered the Merry Two? http://www.merrywherry.com/mtwo.html Chris Duff used a modified version for his recent expedition so seems quite capable of handling rough conditions. http://www.olypen.com/cduff/Frames.html

    A few more sites for inspiration are
    http://www.angusrowboats.com/
    http://koti.kapsi.fi/hvartial/index.htm
    http://www.guideboat.ca/
    http://www.capefalconkayak.com/adirondackguideboat.html
    http://www.capefalconkayak.com/jwboat.html
    http://www.capefalconkayak.com/campcruisingcortez.html
     
  12. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Whoa Squid: you can't build a 20' boat in a 21' garage unless you keep opening the door to get to the other side - and Winter is coming on. Leaving 2' at each end, you have space for a 17' boat and you can definitely stretch a 15' boat that much.
     
  13. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    Situate the boat diagonally in the garage, assuming there is room.
     
  14. KJL38
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    KJL38 Junior Member


  15. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I'm in SF Bay area, we don't have weather here.

    My garage is 21' on the short side, and the other half is about 23', and about 30' on the diagonal.

    Thx for the Bolger 19' 6" boat and other boats. Are there actual plans for sale anywhere?

    All I've found are sites that comment on various Bolger plans.

    Isn't there a site that hosts/sells all or most of Bolger's designs/plans?
     
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