houseboat floor?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by dragn, Apr 3, 2015.

  1. dragn
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: Sudbury

    dragn Junior Member

    New here. And to anything boat related.. i am currently building a 44' ×14' houseboat. The puntoons are square and the crossers are also aluminum. But my flooring will be regular outdoor 3/4 plywood. . I had an idea of adding a vapor barrier under the 3" crossers in between the pontoons.. that would have a vapor barrier, then a 3" space ,, then floor.. with plenty of air to move from the ends... but my pontoons are 30" ×30". So the floor will be quite high from the water. . Not sure if that would be over doing things or not? .. thanks in advance
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    Don't put the vapor barrier in (assuming some sort of plastic sheeting), as it'll just provide a real nice place for condensation to collect, even with a 3" air space. The best approach is to seal the low grade plywood with epoxy, but if just painted, it's best if left exposed to continuous and unimpaired air flow.
     
  3. dragn
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: Sudbury

    dragn Junior Member

    Id thought about epoxy. But i already need to purchase close to ten gallons to cover the roof deck. And my budget is already blown.lol i may just use a decent paint.. and maybe next year or two i will spray foam insulation to seal and insulate the underside
     
  4. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    A better way to build the deck would be to make a sandwich. Lay 3/8" ply down, then on top make a grid of 1.5" x 2.5" solid timber, making sure that some line up with your cross beams underneath. Fill the spaces in the grid with 1.5" rigid foam and then lay another layer of 3/8" down. Through bolt the whole thing to the cross beams.
     
  5. dragn
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: Sudbury

    dragn Junior Member

    Oh man. Thats hard core.. i think ill stick with the 3/4 ply. Its mostly going to be more of a floating cottage. Not going to be mobile.. and being pulled out and dry docked in the fall so maintenance wont be a problem. Ive recently been told that simple drivway sealer is great for keeping moisture away.. even if you need to reaply every so many years.. not too bad.. ever hear of this?
     

  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Likes: 488, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There are a number of "driveway sealers" and most work great on a driveway, though not so much in the marine environment. The same is true of elastometric roof coatings. Now, truck bed liner does work, but it's more costly than epoxy. If just painting, use the best primer you can afford (epoxy preferred) and more than 2 coats, so you have sufficient film thickness. The same is true of the finish coat, lay down more than enough to insure it's something you're not going to have to do again next year or the year after.
     
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