Hopeit Sails

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by hopeit, Jul 28, 2010.

  1. hopeit
    Joined: Jul 2010
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    Location: Florida

    hopeit New Member

    Here are some pictures. I built this from a 14 foot canoe and made the outriggers from plywood.. She is very stable but refuses to tack. I can sail about 45 degrees into the wind but cant get her to come accross to tack. I was thinking i need to move the mast back a bit and would like some input.
     

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  2. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    I lack the expertise but would be interested in seeing the video under sail.
     
  3. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Arlington, WA-USA

    Petros Senior Member

    Moving the sail back may help, but it does not look like you have a very good dagger board. If the rudder does not have a good keel or centerboard to pivot against, tacking will always be slow and clumsy because the the hulls will just mush sideways. What you have looks too flimsy, consider it takes the sideways force of the sail. It is also too far aft relative to the sail. So either move the sail back, or move your center board forward. With too much distance between the centerboard and the sails centroid area it becomes difficult to control in a strong reaching wind.

    You could add a side board pretty easy, install it a foot or two aft of the mast location, you can incorporate it into your front boom mount. I you make a sideboard, make sure it is fairly sturdy, it will be taking the side load from the sails. Make about 3 to 4 percent of the sail area. round off the leading edge of the centerboard and the rudder, that will make more effective as well.

    Also, you might consider making the rudder bigger as well. Make the rudder relatively low aspect ratio, or it will stall too easy and not be effective.

    With a good centerboard or side board, and a larger rudder, you will find it much more responsive to your tiller inputs and you should be able to bring it around in a tack.

    Good luck.
     
  4. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Isn't that a centerboard in the central photo?
     

  5. hopeit
    Joined: Jul 2010
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    Location: Florida

    hopeit New Member

    Yes .. she has a centerboard .. it is just half inch plywood at this time but is a good 2 feet down from the bottom of the hull.

    Caqnt move the centerboard but moving the mast will be fairly easy.

    Sorry .. no video yet.
     
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