Home Made wind direction indicator

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by rwatson, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Last edited: Jul 28, 2013
  2. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

  3. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

  4. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

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  5. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    What is interesting is that there are no moving parts
     
  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    A major bonus - some of the kits have magnetic bearings, but moving stuff is a recipe for wear and tear
     
  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    My father in law had some of these home made devices and they worked for years, but they weren't especially accurate. Wind direction in 22.5 degree increments? This is fine if you're just picking up weather patterns, but a sailor will likely want a more precise indication of shifts. The same was true of his wind speed device. He was a pilot, so general information was all he plotted.

    For less than $200 bucks you can get a Davis Instruments package that does a lot more which a much higher accuracy level. Finding a 12 VDC version, will be a challenge, but they're available.
     
  8. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I bought it because a seagull smashed off my traditional masthead transducer
     
  9. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member


    $200 ??? That only gets you some cables and accessories

    http://www.davisinstruments.com.au/#!products/ceon
     
  10. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Once you have a transducer you then need to repackage the data into something usefull like NMEA. Wind sensors typical supply autopilots.
     
  11. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    yes - a real consideration. Swinging, bending gear gets knocked around a lot by birds, other boats masts etc
     
  12. HakimKlunker
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    HakimKlunker Andreas der Juengere

    My favourite: Cigarette lighter (light wind), tell tales (always), torch lamp (night sailing)
    Together with the magnetic compass I get along.
    If we permanently stare on instruments we may as well stay in front of our computers :)
     
  13. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Like the Irish mans weather station, a bit of string nailed to the mast

    when its horizontal, its windy
    when its wet, its rainy,
    when there's a shadow - its sunny
     
  14. HakimKlunker
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    HakimKlunker Andreas der Juengere

    :) The Irish have much seafaring experience and so cannot be too wrong.

    To make a constructive contribution:
    This 'Irish' device indicates to me, that one does not need an instrument to show the obvious.
    Some autopilots may use this information, though.
    To some extent I do use the wind speed indicator for making reefing decisions. But then again: a pot in the pantry can do the same job...
    It is a different matter here when racing; I have a feed back on boat performance when I can compare wind speed with boat speed.
     

  15. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Yes indeed, a lot can be done without instruments.

    I must admit in my case, i am curious to see if i can create a visual indicator for a scale model boat, so that i can record the wind direction on a video camera.

    a simple vane can be a bit vague on a two dimensional video screen.

    maybe i can link a multicoloured disk to a vane, to provide a visual cue
     
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