Historical multihulls

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Gary Baigent, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    One suggestion I can think of is to relocate and set up your job in the area you want to move to first. Then start looking for boats, the area you talked about will have more to choose from and the logistics will be much simpler. Instead of having to change everything the boat is all you'll have to worry about. Finally if you've only come to the trimaran bug in the last 2 months realize there is nothing wrong with moving on at this stage in the game despite what forum jerks like myself may say. For most people this obsession is a life long condition for which there is no cure. Late onset trimaranitis could herald other life changes, be open to blondes and red convertibles.... they are easier to find. I'll try to ignore the quest for awhile.
     
  2. Ilan Voyager
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    Ilan Voyager Senior Member

    You're fairly right, simply I took fastly a 60 feet trimaran from the first edition, and the closest size of the 2014 edition to illustrate grossly the evolution in 36 years. As the sizes changed all time, that was a bit difficult to find consistent results.
    The 1980ies were a big burst of creativity with the competition between French and British. It's sad that later, because of financing problems for the other nations, multi oceanic competition became a Franco-French affair.

    The 1980-1990 boats were splendid, innovation was popping from everywhere and we were like excited children in a toys shop discovering the new boats.
    Apricot was a beauty and opened the way to Fujicolor and all the descendants. I love deeply the work of Irens (who is gentleman).
    Ker Cadelac 2 is one of the most beautiful boats ever made. I kept in my office during years a super poster of this boat.It descends of the Langevin design PIR2, and Marc Lombard has a stroke of genius. There is an anecdote, probably apocrypha, that the builder looking at the plans, thought that the amas were too short and added 1 meter more in the central section. This foiler had a successful career from 1985 to 1992 but needed extensive reparations in 1986 after very serious structural problems, the plague of most of the big multis of the time. These foilers lacked of downwind speed and thus the idea was abandoned. It may come back...
    Paragon was a good tri, but not as good as the Iren tris, who are better all around. After Thomson went with ill fated projects and disappeared from the scene.
    You did not mentioned the Jet Services catamarans saga. The Jet Services V 1987 was a monster Tornado of 22.85 m designed by Ollier, with bolted tube beams in carbon!. An anecdote; the second step of the Course de L'Europe 1987 started at Bremerhaven in the river. A big black cloud appears with a good wind, the crew sends the spinnaker and goes down the river like crazy at more than 30 knots forgetting all the other boats including the motor ones, a fantastic show. They arrived at Edinburgh with several hours of advance...This cata had a very long career with several records, and made in 1993 the first record of 79 days around the world with crew (note that 13 years later Joyon made solo the record at 57 days and you can measure all the progress made...and also shows the fact that with multis length pays a lot). Jet was a very brutal, a true shaker, and tiring boat with little protection. Now the NA take more care of the needs of the crew and also the boats are more "sweet" in their movements. Now dismantled in Poland.
    We can say the same about the other big catamaran Formule Tag 1983 by Irens, later renamed Enza, and other names. Transformed to solar boat on 2014.
    The lesson is that trimarans are "sweeter", passing better in the sea, tiring less the crew.
    Pics 1-Ker Cadelac 2, 2-Jet Services V the super Tornado, 3- Enza based on Formula Tag, legthened.
     

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  3. Ilan Voyager
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    Ilan Voyager Senior Member

    I've never had a big boat, I always sailed as crew on "big" boats. Like said one of friends, we leave the problems to the owner, we take the pleasure of sailing. If we dismast, or destroy the spinnaker the bill is for the owner.

    However in small boats I owned a Fireball (a race dinghy) I built and raced at 17 years old, two monodromic proas one of 14 feet Dragonfly by White, definitely too slow built in Constant Camber a tedious method, I gave it to a sail school. The other proa 18 feetx10 feet I designed and built in compounded plywood for jumping the waves at La Torche with the windsurfer fellows, I got it under 85 kg, great fun, some enormous crashes, the last one pulverized the proa and I ended at the hospital half drowned and totally bruised.
    2 modified Tornados with spis, in shared property, built in group, used for coastal raid. Great fun. One is always sailing as hard and fast in the French way.
    5 cats 18 feet with unirig 18m2 from 1984 to 1992, the purpose of these cats was to serve as laboratory for validating shapes, hydrodynamic and aerodynamic options in collaboration with a think tank team. Very fruitful results with lots of data, which were employed later.

    Navigation in classic cruise not a lot. More with bit of racing as crew on monohulls beginning of the 70ies, I discovered multis and I got the virus.
    A big dozen of Channel crossings monohull and cats, 2 Atlantic crossings while convoying a 20 meters cat and later a 22 meters tri all expenses and return paid plus wages, with nice weather, good wines and beautiful girls. The dream for the holidays. The skipper-professional convoyer was a friend.
    A lot of short convoying race boats, mainly F40 and a few 60 feet tris, and a bug bunch of coastal raids with boats ranging from the Hobie18 feet, to the F40 catamarans. Raid means going full gas but with a part of navigation work like cruising. Making a route on a plastified map on a small beach cat is great fun...Plus like everybody, the habitual rounds in the water in front of the beach of the sail club. Choose a rich big club with hundreds of members and last fashion boats. That permits to try a lot of boats, as lots of owners are crying to find a crew. When you're a bit known as the technical specialist you must have a list like the most beautiful girl of the party.
     
  4. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Sounds like fun, I like the club idea. There is much to be said for small boats. I cruise ranging pretty far up the PNW coast used to use a mono uldb, went bigger for the waters and range. Raced monos back in school days. Finding Mike McMullen's and Rudy Choy's books in the library started me on to multihulls. Vintage is its own reward, part of the fun for me is keeping a piece of history sailing and surprising the modern world. Nothing like seeing an owner who spent several 100 thousand watch you pass him. The Nicol was a interim boat but worked so well it became a keeper, plus was built with very good materials, worth preserving and fun for a boatbuilder as a project.
     
  5. Skip JayR
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    Skip JayR Tri Enthusiast

    Trimaran Spirit of Ireland ! Become the new owner of a Drama Queen on high seas.

    Trimaran Spirit of Ireland ! Or: Become the new owner of a Drama Queen on high seas.

    This 60 foot boat touched my eyes... and when starting reading about the history I became aware: its a real fighter having experienced many dramas on high seas since it was built in 1982.

    Read on your own about the Trimaran Spirit of Ireland here. (P.S.: The boat is for sales since 2014. I would say roughly for a 33 year old boat ~100% overprized)

    [​IMG]
     
  6. warwick
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    warwick Senior Member

    Is it rob James old boat
     
  7. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    correct. and it boasts a rather checkered history. Not a good boat even when new, probably one to avoid now

    RW
     
  8. Skip JayR
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    Skip JayR Tri Enthusiast

    Yes, all infos about Rob's boat and its history here.
     
  9. Skip JayR
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    Skip JayR Tri Enthusiast

    Richard, what do you mean with ? Naturally boats of the beginning 80th do not have the righting moment... with the classical bows and lower volume in front segment compared to trimarans of our times it might be named a "unsafely boat".

    As a racing trimaran it wont be competitive anymore, but lets say using it as a faster cruising trimaran in the range of 14-16 knots I'd think its still a safe boat, isnt ?

    To give a comparison... and for better understanding: naval architect Charlie Chapelle (founder and former owner of Technologie Marine / France) who built many successfully racing Trimarans is still sailing the legendary Tri Acapella Ocean, a boat designed by Walter Green from 1978 on, e.g. for Mike Birch... see the attachments as the yellow beauty looks today.

    Seems for me one can have lots of fun on such elder (and seaworthy) boats nowadays sailing/racing the Route de Rhum as Charlie did in 2014.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlnqPQfO4oQ


    The amas of both boats, those of Acapella Ocean and of Spirit of Ireland look for me very similarly. Isnt ?
     

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  10. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    Acapella has new floats by Nigel Irens, cool boat that and campaigned by Charlie Capelle. The current owner of Spirit of Ireland has sailed her extensively in cruise mode and maintained the boat well from what I understand.
     
  11. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Won the Round Britain ... has to be a dog?
     
  12. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    It was a very close finish in the 82 RBR. Remember its not just boats that win races, crew skill helps! And Rob was a far better sailor than Chay Blyth. But Chay is still a better sailor than Tony Bullimore. Apricot only won the 85 RBR because Nigel Irens was on board

    CC had low buoyancy outriggers, very fine aft and a very fine main hull forwards. Over 30 years old, capsizes, rig failures and now in cruising trim I am sure it is a heavy boat so the outriggers are even lower buoyancy

    I never sailed it though, but did watch it sailing. However I did sail extensively on GB4 with Don Wood

    Paragon was extensively modified by Dave Alan Williams who raced on it in the 85 RBR.

    RW
     
  13. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    It does have to be strong to go through all that. It had a exotic layup for the time, wonder how the repairs were handled. Naomi was on board that day trying to turn it around, pretty awful. Rob's book is a great read still today. He sailed both and was pretty fair with the assessments. Incremental progress rather than a big breakthrough. I read it was lengthened at one point later on in a Multihulls Mag. Wonder if I can find the issue.
     
  14. rogerf
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    rogerf Junior Member

    Lets say that racing boats should always be sailed as racing boats, in cruising mode or otherwise.
     

  15. Skip JayR
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    Skip JayR Tri Enthusiast

    Where starts cruising modus, and where stops racing modus ?

    hm... that is an interesting statement, and maybe a provocative one, too. :)

    So I feel free to start a new thread about this question. I have not thought yet about it, so deeply.

    Personally I'd cluster multihulls and trimarans specifically into four categories to get an understanding about an "old boat":

    1. racing design
    2. racing-cruising version (of the original racing design)
    3. cruising version (of the original racing design)
    4. cruising-racing version (modification of 3. to be competitive in regattas for amateurs)

    But lets start this aspect newly in the thread here:

    "How to sail/buy racing trimarans in cruising modus ?"

    You are invited to participate actively.
     
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