Historical multihulls

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Gary Baigent, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. CT 249
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    CT 249 Senior Member

    It doesn't take long to see some very good possible reasons for the sale of Moxie - ones that don't involve anyone being pathetic or anti-multi.

    For one, the NA seems to keep its boats inside a basin about 44' wide, so Moxie would have about 5'5' clearance each side. Judge the cross-flowing current wrong once, with a 50 foot long 33' wide boat in a busy area, and suddenly a charitable organisation is trying to find the cash and expertise to carry out repairs.....and judging from the sneers around here, they would be abused for bending a great boat as well. And did the boat even have a usable engine when it was donated? I seem to recall from Phil's book that the boat had no engine when he had it.

    Secondly, the NA exists to train people by racing, and racing a 56'er against half a dozen 30' multis (including heavy Gemini cruisers) may not be exactly challenging.

    Thirdly, where is a charitable organisation used to monos suddenly going to find the skills to run and maintain a big multi (including perhaps fitting a diesel) and would that be the most efficient use of its time and effort?

    Fourthly, the NA sells many donated boats, including many monos. There is simply no logical reason to see their sale of Moxie as anything special, or anything born of bigotry or stupidity.

    Multihull World's article on Moxie said that the Navy realised "it could not make the best use of the boat" which seems pretty realistic.

    I've been a member of mono, multihull and windsurfer organisations that turned down donations. It's a pity to see hate and insults being thrown at other people for doing the same thing. If we demand that people respect our tastes and craft, surely it's only reasonable to do the same thing in return?
     
  2. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    A flying boat is an airplane, used to be big back on the pre airfield Pacific routes....I should know better than to try and translate or proofread Kiwi prose :)
     
  3. Sundreamer
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    Sundreamer New Member

    Sundreamer back racing after a 5 year sabbatical
     
  4. semelis
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    semelis Junior Member

    Attached Files:

  5. BobBill
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    BobBill Senior Member

    Got to be a way to trailer the suckers or store on beach?
     
  6. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Tisserand

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    semelis, thank you for posting that link!
     
  7. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    CT249 said.:- I've been a member of mono, multihull and windsurfer organisations that turned down donations. It's a pity to see hate and insults being thrown at other people for doing the same thing. If we demand that people respect our tastes and craft, surely it's only reasonable to do the same thing in return?

    For once I agree with Chris. :)
     
  8. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Actually the Naval Academy used to get a lot of donated boats (often for tax purposes), in fact more than they could hope to utilize themseves. So many were sold off for the money that could then be put into their sailing program(s).
     
  9. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    You've got that all correct. Sorry I didn't see your posting before I submitted my recent one
     
  10. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    FFS. We're talking about Dick Newick's and Phil Weld's famous Moxie, winner and record holder (then) of the OSTAR ... not you average unwanted merde-box donation. Did I say FFS?
     
  11. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Sorry, but at that time of multihull development/history, ANY multihull was not even considered relevant. I lived and worked just across the creek from the NA at the time, and was surprised as well.

    It just didn't fit in with their program at the time. And it was a 'wooden vessel' on top of that.

    They took it out sailing a couple of times if i remember correctly, but that's about it. It just was not one of their 'proper training vessels'.
     
  12. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Thanks Brian, that is exactly my point ... which I call ignorance crossed with stupidity. Some here can blather on concocting wet excuses ... but end of day, being presented with a famous and (maybe too) modern design - but actually a work of art ... pearls before swine? I think so.
     
  13. CT249
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    CT249 Senior Member

    So they were presented with a work of art, and you reckon they should have handed it over to a bunch of trainees who could have bashed and flapped it around an unsuitable location and maintained by people without multi experience?

    Instead, the boat is being actively sailed by someone who loves it. That's a bad thing in your eyes? You actually WANT to stop the boat from being used by multihull lovers? How very odd.

    As an analogy, imagine if the Army Armoured School was given one of Michael Schumacher's F1 cars as a tax dodge. Would you rather they sell it to a collector, or use it to train tank drivers?

    As already mentioned, I've been in organisations that have been donated stuff. We've SAVED the good stuff, not sent it to the training school to get the crap knocked out of it.

    Ah well, it's just more evidence that haters love to hate, and that some people will go out of their way in order to feel persecuted.
     
  14. CT249
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    CT249 Senior Member

    Thanks for confirming that there were good practical reasons for them to pass Moxie to someone who loves her.

    However, where is the evidence that 'no multi was considered relevant' at the time? Moxie's win was very widely covered and praised in the international sailing press. Around the same time, many people were making (incorrect) announcements that we were at the start of an era when multis would basically take over sailing. Magazines around here, at least, were very happy to cover multis, and pics and information on historical multis could be found in magazines. The future commodore of the CYCA was chartering Australia's fastest multi a few years later. Beach cats were booming.

    There wasn't all that much interest in historical monos at the time, either - boats like the J Class were mostly rotting in mudbanks or motoring around the Med. Historic windsurfers were getting sold for very little with no concern about preservation. There was no real interest in historic dinghies.

    In that context, there's nothing anti-multi about passing on Moxie.

    Oh, and it looks as like the NA also sold on the TP 52 Samba Pa Ti (donated by the very establishment Kilroys of Kialoa fame) and many other "establishment" monos. Not only that, they have been doing it for decades, selling on boats like the 1930s classic "Highland Light" many years ago.

    Since the NA sells on historic "establishment" monos as well as multis, there seems to be absolutely no evidence of anti-multi bigotry.
     

  15. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Entirely miss my point - and you seem to think that the naval recruits are complete incompetents (which is not what I was implying) - so I'll spell it out slowly: Navy HIERACHY had the chance to introduce a modern boat to recruits, (and I'm sure Phil Weld would have known about recruit sailing abilities - otherwise he wouldn't have made the offer) - but the hierachy turned him down.
    My point: it was anti-multihull prejudice of the power structure that caused the students to miss the chance. It could have been a positive thing. Because there would have been talent amongst the students; there always is.
    And by the way, nothing to do with haters and other silly BS.
     
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