Historical multihulls

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Gary Baigent, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Lucky guy!
     
  2. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 3,770
    Likes: 189, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 826
    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    I queried the boats in the photo and found out that it's actually not a wildthing trimaran in the background but a Grainger 075 trimaran "Sirocco". You can see a series of pics at this link of the nosedive:

    http://thecoastalpassage.com/driven_in.html
     
  3. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
    Posts: 1,813
    Likes: 137, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 349
    Location: South Lake Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    When a Multi stuffs it like this, what is more important to get off first, traveller, mainsheet or vang ?

    I'm thinking vang ?
     
  4. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 2,123
    Likes: 55, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    All of the above......
     
  5. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 2,208
    Likes: 166, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1244
    Location: Back full time in the UK

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Vang on a monohull. Probably traveller on a multihull as you may well not be able to release the mainsheet quickly enough

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  6. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 3,009
    Likes: 127, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 509
    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Thanks Corley, quite a sequence. Maybe those over long float bows helped in this ohshituation, boat saved itself.
     
  7. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 2,208
    Likes: 166, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1244
    Location: Back full time in the UK

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    This is a very very poor quality photo. But it was taken in 1959 and shows my first catamaran, 6ft long.

    My father built it and you can see by the (long) painter he is holding that he didn't want me too sail far. My 2 year old brother is "crew"

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     

    Attached Files:

  8. SpiritWolf15x
    Joined: Apr 2010
    Posts: 194
    Likes: 1, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 15
    Location: Vancouver, Canada

    SpiritWolf15x Senior Member

    Pray...
     
  9. hump101
    Joined: Oct 2004
    Posts: 261
    Likes: 14, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 58
    Location: Brittany, France

    hump101 Senior Member

    Wow, that is beautiful, you must have felt like the king of the world!!!
     
  10. teamvmg
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 124
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 22
    Location: christchurch,uk

    teamvmg Senior Member

    Good luck finding the vang in a hurry!

    [Multihulls don't have vangs]
     
  11. fhrussell
    Joined: Dec 2004
    Posts: 156
    Likes: 2, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 30
    Location: Long Island, NY

    fhrussell Boatbuilder

    That's 'Rhiannon'. I think the hulls came from the Roland 36 (NACRA) molds that Wayne Iwamoto has in his shop in Costa Mesa, CA.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_U_1Nnl8ZxA&list=UUXnpwO3b-KJNBdhITeY8t6g&index=44

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qyHVGhQjanQ&list=UUXnpwO3b-KJNBdhITeY8t6g

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9BTlVp6vW8&list=UUXnpwO3b-KJNBdhITeY8t6g

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3C3wk6nYbrA&list=UUXnpwO3b-KJNBdhITeY8t6g
     
  12. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 3,009
    Likes: 127, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 509
    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Jim Young sent me this print of Auckland's Ron Paterson patented 1975 design; the two flat bottom floats with vertical skegs were attached to the main hull by a universal joint and the system relied on tension keeping the spread out platform intact - and so, as a result, everything was very light. Jim said this was an idea worth pursuing. He sailed an earlier model, which had pedal steering and said that under sail power the rear float tended to lift and the pressured forward one went down. But this could have been changed with an angled skeg (foil) on the forward float.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. HASYB
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 310
    Likes: 16, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 143
    Location: The Netherlands

    HASYB Senior Member

    Whoa, almost looks like kiting. Do you know if/how those floats were steered?
    Couldn't they just twist the sail for some more lift? I do see some Sailrocket origins.
     
  14. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 2,097
    Likes: 40, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 436
    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    This all goes back to the late Bernard Smiths book, "The 40 KT Sailboat" published in 1963. :eek:
     

  15. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 3,009
    Likes: 127, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 509
    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Except, OS7, Bernard Smith's boats were triangular in plan form with fixed beams whereas the Ron Paterson is very simple stick, tension lines and universal joint, sort of a forerunner to the modern kiteboard ... except that the "kite" made light contact via small floats with water.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.