Historical monohulls

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Gary Baigent, Jun 11, 2013.

  1. Gary Baigent
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    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Since the multihull equivalent thread has proved quite popular, here's a new one on monohulls, with a slant to light displacement.
    Here is the very attractive 33 foot S&S Spirit which sailed down to Auckland from Fiji, (and before that from California?) in the then fast time, for a flush decked daysailing monohull, of around five and a bit days. Came here in the early 1970's, because a young Kiwi Ron Holland was on board along with the bright Kiskaddon bunch. This was around the time that the Mull designed big red, 42 foot dinghy with a large transom rudder, Improbable which was built here by Keith Atkinson. The design seemed very radical to North Americans because of its light displacement ... but Kiwis thought it actually a moderate to heavy design.
     

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  2. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Found another shot of Spirit; looking for one of Improbable. This was a period of US/Kiwi connections with Mull, Kiskaddon, Holland, Spencer getting new designs built here.
     

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  3. IOR
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    IOR Junior Member

    Imp

    The Ron Holland 40 feet design IMP (launched 1977) that won a series of prestigious offshore races from 1977 to now (i. e. winner of the Fastnet Race 1977).
    The design was subsequently built from 1978 to 1980 in a series production by Nautor, Finnland, as Swan 39. 21 cruising and 12 racing hulls of Swan 39 were built. The Swan 39 racing was also a successful IOR racer.
     

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  4. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    This is me sailing a Windmill in Mary Esther, Florida in about 1966-an amazing 47 years ago:
     

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  5. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Georgia

    I was very lucky to have been raised on and near the water, but I missed out on this great boat: the Georgia. The parents owned and cruised this boat while they were in Connecticut. Didn't have an engine for the first few years!
    The Yachting cover shows my Dad in white standing, holding the tiller. Dad had started a new Company and moved to Oklahoma and one day this arrived in the mail-boy were they surprised-had no idea someone had taken this shot!
    The boat is a 60' Larchmont "O" boat. I searched for her a few years ago with no luck. If anyone has seen her I'd love to know about it....

    click---
     

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  6. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Superb. Sorry for ignorance; who/where/was/is Larchmont?
    Georgia reminds me of Knud Reimers' designs, like Ranger here (modified Reimers copy).
     
  7. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    ================
    All I know is whats here, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larchmont,_New_York except that I think the Larchmont Yacht Club created the Class early in the last century. My Dad loved the Georgia and communicated his love of sailing to me and my brother. And Gary, I still like to heel over to this day!
    That picture was supposedly taken when my Mom was "with child"-that would be me. So, a good lawyer could argue that I actually sailed on Georgia!
    =================
    Just found an old post by Earl Boebert, in response to me bringing up Georgia on an RC thread:

    "Interesting boat. Designed to the Universal Rule, so guaranteed to be pretty. Designed by William Gardner, the designer of the famous schooner "Atlantic" as a one-design class for members of the Larchmont, New York, and Manhasset Bay clubs. Rated at 35.63 feet under the Rule, between the official "N" and "P" Classes. Six were built by Wood & McClure of New York, and launched in the Spring of 1917:

    "Varuna," owned by James Ford
    "Georgia" , Charles Lane Poor (author of "Men Against the Rule")
    "Celeritas", H. Kendall Hester
    "Mirage", T.J.S. Flint
    "Nimbus" E.P. Alker
    "Grey Dawn" Philip Johnson (of Philadelphia).

    Class symbol was an "L" inside a circle.

    59 ft 10 in LOA, 38 ft 6 in LWL, 7 feet 10 in draft, 12 ft beam. 35,500 lbs. 1700 sq feet sail. Gaff, converted to Marconi by Gardner in 1926.

    A one inch to the foot model would be about the size of an EC12 and displace 20.5 lbs. She wouldn't be able to carry 1700 sq in of sail, so John Black's trick of multiplying the linear dimension of the sail plan by .9 and then shortening the boom (to increase the aspect ratio and fool the eye into thinking the rig is taller than it really is) would take her down to 1100 square inches, which full-keel boats of that size (such as the 1920's MYRAA D and R Class) were known to handle. That's for the Marconi rig. If you left her as a gaffer I think she would be able to handle the 1300 sq in you get by just adjusting the linear measure.

    All this data, and the lines plans below, from Edwin Schoettle's "Sailing Craft," the definitive work on yachts in the 1920's. Reprinted a number of times, there are ton of them available on Abebooks (www.abebooks.com) from seven bucks on up. The book has photos, but unless you spring for the $150 up for the first edition they are too muddy to scan.

    Cheers,

    Earl
     
  8. Douglas Young
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    Douglas Young Junior Member

    William Garden

    New here with new to us boat. Found myself a nice project: Share if you too have any info. 1979 Family Cat by William Garden.[​IMG]
     
  9. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Goodness Doug. Somebody stole your jib. That was my first year in a Windmill also.
     
  10. Doug Lord
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    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    -------------------
    I loved sailing singlehanded with no jib and a few years later some guys copied the Windmill hull, called it a "US 1" and a new class popped up when I was in Orlando. Raced it for about a year. Just a main as well-slightly bigger than the 'mill ,if I remember right. Too low freeboard aft-you could fill the boat up tacking in heavy air with the stern going under as the boat turned...
     
  11. philSweet
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    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

  12. Doug Lord
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    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

  13. Gary Baigent
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    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Not historical, well, maybe it is now, but a neat photograph of the Cox's Bay Skimmer DreadO on its cradle at Motions Creek, Auckland, taken by Jacques de Reuck, who lives on the waters edge. We're going through some heavy and dramatic weather here at moment.
     

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  14. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Laurie Davidson's Jumpin' Jack Flash, one of a series of 50-55 foot light displacement monohulls: JJF was 50, Honky Tonk Woman and Night Raider 52, the famous Starlight Express, then 55 foot Emotional Rescue, (JJF and the latter were Graeme Woodroffe's boats) JJF here in Hawaii beating the much larger heavies like Doug Peterson's Bullfrog.
    John Malitte photograph.
     

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  15. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    This is my sailing mate Jacques de Reuck's Mini Transat 6.5 metre Vileda, designed for the 1979 race by Daniel Charles - an interesting boat that came in fourth, narrow and light, built in aluminum. Jacques has good memories of Vileda and is trying to locate and bring it over to Auckland. 1979 was the year that Norton Smith won in the breakthrough Tom Wylie designed American Express, the beginning of the wide and light big dinghy designs. Vileda was very narrow in comparison, carried a deep bulb keel.
     

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