Hidden Anchors

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Willallison, Jul 17, 2007.

  1. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    I'm looking for info about 'hidden' anchor roller systems - whether these are available semi-off-the-shelf, or if they are purely custom jobs...
    Any info much appreciated....
     

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  2. dougfrolich
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    dougfrolich Senior Member

  3. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Thanks Doug....
     
  4. Omeron
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    Omeron Senior Member

    If i am not mistaken, Brenta 38 (Brenta yachts) has the ultimate hidden
    anchor. It is not deployed from the deck, but from under the hull.
    It is totally immersed in a box in the forepeak. But i could not get any
    more info as to how it works.
     
  5. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Wally Yachts (I think) pioneered that idea, thanks Omeron. They also incorporate the kind of mechanism that I'm interested in in a couple of their powerboats.
     
  6. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Will,

    I had the opportunity last week to run a boat with the ultimate "hidden" anchor. It was a Volvo Penta IPS driven 38 footer. Just push the proper button. No chain, no rode, no anchor either, just keep the diesel tank full. Actually that was a minor part of the system for me. You would love this system. For docking just push the joy stick in the direction your want to go and the fly-by-wire software tells the props what to do. No bow thruster and it can go sideways as far as you like. Rotate the joystick and the boat spins in one spot.

    Wanna order one?
     
  7. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Nope!
    What happens when I try to dock in 2 feet of water Tom?;)
     
  8. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Push the button on top of the joy stick and a rotor pops out of the fly bridge and lifts the whole boat in. Contra rotating rotors of course.

    So there:D
     
  9. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    So, you've abandoned the KISS principle then....
     
  10. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Heck no Will. I was invited to attend a two day seminar on IPS by Volvo of the Americas at their headquarters/distribution facility only 150 miles away and could not turn it down. Well, actually I am a close friend of a NA who was invited and could bring one other person. I will never, ever be able to afford either a boat that could effectively use the system nor the system itself, even if I owned such a boat. The smallest available system is two 350hp diesels, going up to four 750hp units.

    Nevertheless I was impressed with excellent engineering backed by extensive field work and a controlled entry into the marketplace. For those with the big bucks (read huge bucks) and the desire for a big yacht that the nervous spouse can easily drive or dock, it was very impressive. 70' megayachts that look like Nike running shoes are not my bag at all.

    Neither is any private boat that needs 50 to 80 gallons of fuel per hour. Some can take five hours to refuel. Who would like to be low on fuel and in the que at that dock. I probably could not lift the money required to take a cruise in such a monster.

    KISS is still my motto. We worked the marks for an 8 race, 3 day National Championship sailing regatta near here this week. Used about 7 gallons while smaller safety boats used far more.
     
  11. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    :D IPS and Merc's equivalent Zeus are impressive for their engineering and technological advances, but I'm afraid I just can't get past the vulnerability of both systems (IPS in particular) to grounding. I guess there are are plenty of people who do little more than marina hop, and for them these drives may present no real impediment. But I'm afraid that I'll never be buying a pair of them - not just coz I couldn't afford it either!
    On the cost front, I doubt that many cruisers will ever recoup the additional outlay that's required to buy them either. Sure - they use less fuel - but at an average <100 hrs per year......
    Where they do excell is in their 'packaging': smaller engines, located further aft, means more living space - and we all know how important that is in the market place. Then of course, there's the docking ability etc....They're strong selling points.

    I'm yet to be convinced that for less money both manufacturers couldn't develop sterndrives capable of taking more power. Konrad have managed it. So have Merc with their racing drives. Hey presto, very similar levels of efficiency and still able to traverse 'skinny' water....
     
  12. marshmat
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    marshmat Senior Member

    But uber-sterndrives are not as "new" or "innovative" (in quotes, since both IPS and Zeus are simply scaled-down versions of the podded drives that our local car ferry has used for 30-plus years), and certainly not as trendy. I really don't believe that IPS or Zeus are actually a whole lot more efficient than a properly set-up sterndrive of comparable prop size would be. Better than straight-shaft inboard with exposed running gear, yes, but I think a lot of it is just hype and glossy flyers.
    As to the original question about fold-away/hidden anchor sprits.... I've certainly never seen a commercially-produced one around here.
     
  13. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    I saw a large Lazzara boat with 4 of these leave the docks in Boat show. Very impressive. However I also worry about grounding or floating log. Salesperson answer... That is what you have insurance for.. No kidding

    Anyway I cant afford them- 2 of these cost more than my boat and full years maintenance and fuel.
     
  14. marshmat
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    marshmat Senior Member

    I would like to think that the hull and the drive's protection systems (ie, my outboard's solid metal skeg and beefy kickup springs) are my insurance against hitting a log....
     

  15. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    You guys certainly have good points and I am no salesman for either IPS or Zeus. These are not currently competitive with either shaft drive or stern drive since they seem to be restricted to larger boats at over 25 kts which keeps them out of reach for most of us. The pods are designed to sheer off and have been tested for that by running into logs, etc. The drive shafts are made with two separate spline joint so that no damage is done to anything inside the boat when disaster happens. The other systems don't fare any better and sometimes worse when running into stuff.

    The big ships must think that there is some real economic advantage or they would not be using them. The Voith Schneider drives do the same thing at lower speed and have an even greater damage risk from flotsam.

    I did not care much for the boat, a Tiara 38, but did like the maneuverability. If I were a builder of expensive yachts, I would love the simplicity of installation and standardization of propulsion systems for maintenance. The 70' Lazzara maneuvered as easily as the smaller ones. Call it what we will, I expect they will sell lots of them to the well heeled crowd.

    I would worry more about a software glitch that takes over and rams my boat into another in the marina than losing a drive pod.
     
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