Hi Everyone! 1950s Muskoka Bracebridge Lake Craft

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Adam Connolly, Aug 22, 2020.

  1. Adam Connolly
    Joined: Aug 2020
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Smiths Falls Ont

    Adam Connolly New Member

    Hi all.
    Im a new wooden boat owner. I just picked up a project boat.
    18ft Lake Craft made by the Muskoka Canoe company. The PO just lost interest in finishing her. He was very thorough even the stern light bulb got its own baggy and tag. All the original hardware is here and 95% of it has been replated. This is my first woody resto. I have done a few fiberglass restos and am a marine and small engine mech.
    I think i did ok on her 400.00 including the trailer and he gave me a ton of extras.
    I will be needing some help trying to figure out the best way to finish her. Steps for finishing the bow and gunnels. Do i glass the top after staining and caulking or varnish. Just seems to be a million right and wrong ways to do it.
    Thanks for your time
     

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  2. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    That is a major score.

    Some things need fixin I can see.

    I really like Epifanes Wood Finish UV Gloss.

    Everything must be ready before you apply it. I have done the caulk either way depending upon where it is and the amount of fill. It looks like you have some pretty big gaps that will be a bigger challenge.

    None of it is impossible; just gotta stay after it.
     
  3. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    Plan on decorative caulking at the end.

    Plan on varnish after all major work is complete. You can't varnish over gaping holes.

    Take some closeups of the gaps around the front coaming and we'll see if we can help steer you.

    Take closeups of other major problems.

    A boat likes this gets fixed worst first for the most part.
     
  4. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    That deck is not meant to be glassed. Not saying you can't, but it wasn't built for glassing.
     
  5. Adam Connolly
    Joined: Aug 2020
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Smiths Falls Ont

    Adam Connolly New Member

    Ok thanks very much for the replies. Im really looking forwards to completing her. I have always wanted a wooden boat. My grandparents had a wooden PB before somebody broke into their cottage loaded the boat with evrrything they could steal. Then they burnt the boat. I still remember my grandfather showing me the burnt hull on the bottom of the lake 30ft down.
    Here are some other pics i had taken.
    I know its not the correct windshield but i just placed it on as it came with the boat.
    Any info on the Muskoka Canoe Company LTD? I contacted the Gravenhurst Steam museum. Nothing back yet.
    Thanks again everyone. I will be home later today and will get more pics.
    Adam
     

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    Last edited: Aug 24, 2020
  6. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    Wow. That's a beauty. The best way to do these restores is slow. Take your time and do it right. As Fallguy said, don't glass that deck. It'll be just fine with varnish.
     

  7. Adam Connolly
    Joined: Aug 2020
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Smiths Falls Ont

    Adam Connolly New Member

    Thanks everyone. I started cleaning out and gutting my shop. Putting in an oil furnace and some ducts. I'm hoping to get her into the shop in the next 2 weeks. The PO called me to say he had found the little brass tags that go on the 2 dashes and near the transom. He also found the original red leather cushions. He thought they had been lost years ago in a move.
    And some other odds and ends like the original bow light mast with a flag on it. I want to restore this to a beautiful but functional boat. Not a trailer queen and not one im going to really worry about when one of my kids puts a ding or scratch. I have found one broken frame under the seat and a very old very well made patch near the stern. I have found very little about the manufacturer but have seen a couple Lake Crafts in pictures. None the same as mine though. I've got the parts together to make a 12in round steamer. Just need to assemble it.
    So in your guys best oppinion after I have removed and sanded all the old varnish what are my next moves? Types of varnish you would use. Brush or roller. I did watch a video of a guy using a windshield wiper to apply varnish. It looked beautiful. I have always liked the pinstripes on the bow but was thinking of doing gold leaf instead of white. I have a pile of my great grandfathers gold leaf and his tools. He used to do all the firetrucks and names on the doors in our Parliment Buildings.
    What would you guys do for a sub floor. Right now its a series of 8 cedar planks all cut and numbered to fit between the stringers. I really like the open grate or lattice style I have seen in many old wooden. There's also a huge amount of space under the bow.
    If you want or need more photos I can get them and post.
    I also think I found which motor I'd like to go with. 1959 Mercury 58a 45hp. I will make sure the transom is beefed up a bit and add stronger knee braces. I restored the motor early spring of this year. It is a beautiful little engine. Runs very well.
    It came with an Owens fiberglass that my wife surprised me with. Yeah I know it should be black and will be repainted to original period colors.
    Thanks again everyone.
     

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