Hexacor compared with other composites?

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by kengrome, Feb 5, 2008.

  1. kach22i
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    kach22i Architect

    1. Have you built a 50' offshore race boat using it?

    2. What temperature differentials were the test samples exposed to?

    3. What water/slamming force pressures were the samples exposed to?

    4. What is a "dry as possible lamination" mean? (perhaps this question is directed to rambat).

    NOTE: The homebuilt hovercraft built using plastic hex material (not Hexacore) sometimes see the air pockets heated by the sun, which results in the air expanding and or puckering like little quilt pillows.

    On the up side, there has been no failure or delamination of the fiberglass coating from the core material, nor any reported water absorbtion. Then again hovercraft are stored on land (covered), and not left floating in the water for very long.

    EDIT: Cool slamming picture for ref;
    http://www.safehavenmarine.com/GENESIS 37 development page.htm
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Trimariner
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    Trimariner New Member

    1.
    No I haven't, but there have been a number of power cats built here in Australia one 15.6 meters, several 11 meter power cats, numerous 6 and 7 meter power cats, and numerous sailing cats these boats have been subjected to attrocious conditions, wave pounding, violent bar crossings and groundings and have suffered no reported damage, there is also a tunnel hull race boat that has been racing for just over twelve months with no signs of failure!

    2.
    The samples have been subjected to -30c to +125c without any negative effect!

    3.
    The test samples were placed in an agitator and pounded for 80 hours and apart from very minor bruising were still intact and had not induce any water intrusion into the core, as to what water/slamming pressures the core has been subjected to I believe that has been answered in my answer to question one!

    4.
    To try to explain as simple as possible a dry as possible lamination would be where the resin content is reduced as far as it can without reducing the structural strength, some would consider 40% resin 60% resin a dry as possible lamination, some have different ratios but all would be subject to good engineering!

    I agree that this has occured with some PP honeycombs, and some have actually delaminated, to the best of my knowledge neither Polycore nor Hexacor have suffered from this problem.
     
  3. Trimariner
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    Trimariner New Member

    My apologies I made a mistake regarding resin glass it should read 40% resin 60% glass.
     
  4. kach22i
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    kach22i Architect

    Thank you for the answers, this sort of thing is what makes this forum so special for me, I get to learn a lot.

    I have a nice 12" x 12" sample from Plascore after I took a factory tour last year. The marble-like factory finish is much more rigid than any of the field applied examples I have seen. I also have several unfinished (non-resin) Nidacore samples which always spur my imagination for possible uses.

    I have the Hexacore website bookmarked, I don't ever recall a similar product talking about forming curves with heat before.

    Cutting or scoring the material has never appealed to me.

    Question:
    1. When thermal forming Hexacore, would the inside radius fabric have to be removed to prevent puckering and folds?

    2. When thermal forming Hexacore, will the fiberglass fabric on the outside radius be able to stretch without compromising it's bond to the cells?

    3. I am in the USA (not China or Australia), would it be possible to have free samples mailed to my office so that I may experiment with the material?

    Locations:
    http://www.hexacor.com/contact/offices.htm
     
  5. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    karch, with Nidaplast, Multihull Haven, up near Cardwell (North Queensland between Townsville & Cairns) were using a female mold and tiewire to hold it whilst heat shaping with a "ladies Hair Dryer" I understand, then glassing the inside, pull it out & when upside down do the outside, roll again for fitout.

    I understand the whole operation has moved to China...
     
  6. kach22i
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    kach22i Architect

    It seems like everything has, how sad for us all.
     
  7. juiceclark

    juiceclark Previous Member

    I like the idea of Hexacore and will consider it for the decks and flybridge on our sportfish project. The fabric peeling off while working the material is the obvious concern as mentioned above.

    Having some samples would also be of great interest to me. Could you please send 30 to 40 4'x8' sheets so we can determine its usefulness? With the low labor costs in China, that shouldn't be a problem.

    Thanks!
    Tony in Sw FL

    p.s. Have you sold Hexacore to Hampton Yachts there in China yet? If Jeff Chen thinks it's ok...it's ok.
     
  8. mikereed100
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    mikereed100 Junior Member

    Working with curved surfaces

    While on the Subject of Hexacor....

    I am planning on building the cabin and deck of my catamaran with the stuff. Some of the surfaces will require a bend with a 100cm radius. I am told that the way to accomplish this is by glassing the inside surface and then scoring the outside surface, bending to shape and then glassing the outside surface. My concern is that this will create an uneven outside surface that will require much fairing and added weight.

    Is this the case or does the outside surface even out as it is bent? Also, at what intervals should I score the outer surface? Does it need to be scored the entire thickness or just the veil/film on the outside? Do the scored cells need to be filled prior to glassing? (I assume not but am not sure).

    Lots of questions, I know, but any thoughts would be helpfull.

    Thanks,
    Mike
     
  9. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    Jeees Juiceclark, You want to do your build for free? - I have been told (consequent to similar requests) that there is a tree that does not exist in a deep, dark cave - try barking up that tree - you will be more successful... :D:D:D
     
  10. cioko
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    cioko Junior Member

    can anybody sugest me a literature about kevlar.Or some work published about that?
    Thanks.
     
  11. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    At the top of this page is a search button, a search on this net should yeild something of value with "kevlar"
     
  12. cioko
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    cioko Junior Member

    Thanks
     
  13. keanu916
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    keanu916 Junior Member

    I would like to know if any boat manufactuer will be interested in Aluminum Honeycomb Material,as I know Polypropylene is kind of plastic core,and has problem in fireproof,but if you use Aluminum Honeycomb core material,sercurity is higher,am I right?
     
  14. cioko
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    cioko Junior Member

    Well. you can use both materials but the question is whats cheeper.Now, I do not know the exact material properties of dose honeycomb ,aterials but im am sure thet the tensile and shear strenght of the material with aluminim is higer then the other one.
     

  15. keanu916
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    keanu916 Junior Member

    Talking about the price,has anyone ever considered aluminum honeycomb which is original from China?This is the good solution for price,and if you control good on quality test,maybe you will obtain a better material at the same price you pay for other materials.Will any one give it a shot?
     
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