Herreshoff Flatfish

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by juxtaposer, Jun 15, 2015.

  1. juxtaposer
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Australia

    juxtaposer New Member

    I'm interested in building a Flatfish and was wondering if there are any plans for a cold moulded build out there?

    Also wondering if a cold moulded version would require a change in design due to a change in hull weight?
     
  2. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    What's it look like?
    What do you think the weights would be in the two different versions?
     
  3. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    Do you want the Fish class 20' day boat, designed by Capt. Nat in 1916 as a gaff sloop (redrawn as a Bermudian sloop in the late 20's) or the FlatFish, a Joel White version of the Fish in the late 50's? The Joel White version (centerboard) was produced in some numbers by Fairey Marine, which I think were hot molded.
     

  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Likes: 472, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    David beat me to it, but Joel White plans are available at
    > http://www.woodenboatstore.com/category/white_designs <
    and for the FlatFish;
    > http://www.woodenboatstore.com/product/plan_20_3_Flatfish_Class_Sloop <
    There are a few builders (in the USA) that build this boat, some have converted her to cold molded, but her plans are for carvel over steam bent oak. A molded version (conversion) wouldn't require new lines, though the scantling would change a bit, for the different method. Both build types would produce a similar weight end result. If you wanted a lighter, higher ballast ratio version, then yes, you'd need to rework the lines a little and all of the structure (scantlings), but there'd be little advantage to this approach, as she's a wholesome displacement sailor and wouldn't benefit from this change.
     
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