Help with scooter boat design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Aransas Flats Rat, Jan 22, 2020.

  1. Aransas Flats Rat
    Joined: Sep 2018
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    Location: Florida

    Aransas Flats Rat Senior Member

    Thanks Bajansailor,
    I have looked at them as well but would like to stick with a simple flat bottom with a pocket tunnel and raked bow.
     
  2. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    I see on the Plans List that the price is still US$ 85 (same as when PAR commented on it a few years ago).
    Product Detail – Boat Builder Central https://www.boatbuildercentral.com/proddetail.php?prod=TX18
    I appreciate that you are not keen on the Sea Sled hull form (we need to get Dog Cavalry to have a chat with you :)) - but I am sure that it would still be worthwhile purchasing a set of plans, even if just for reference, as you can then apply the same scantlings, building method etc to your boat?
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2020
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  3. Aransas Flats Rat
    Joined: Sep 2018
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    Location: Florida

    Aransas Flats Rat Senior Member


    Thanks, I have built the XF 20 twice and the SK 14 and gutted and rebuilt a 20’ Explorer
     

    Attached Files:

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  4. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    That is impressive workmanship for sure - I can see that you are not going to have any problems with your new build now.
     
  5. Aransas Flats Rat
    Joined: Sep 2018
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    Location: Florida

    Aransas Flats Rat Senior Member

    Thanks for the kind words. My main problem is I have never drawn up one and don’t have a clue we’re to start. I posted over in proposal as well.

    I know this is were I want to end up. Minus the deck clutter.
    1A7C4B95-F680-4D15-A7AA-C97B81D775D8.jpeg
     
  6. Aransas Flats Rat
    Joined: Sep 2018
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    Location: Florida

    Aransas Flats Rat Senior Member

    Here is my thoughts sorry for the mess I’m not much on drawing but I have it in my head lol.
    2096795A-1F12-4C3D-A98B-F8B8F0362ED9.jpeg
     
  7. Aransas Flats Rat
    Joined: Sep 2018
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    Location: Florida

    Aransas Flats Rat Senior Member

    Another, top view
    314FD361-E6D1-48F6-AE28-7899B8CE994A.jpeg
     
  8. Aransas Flats Rat
    Joined: Sep 2018
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    Location: Florida

    Aransas Flats Rat Senior Member

    I have tried over and over to draw something and I have not been successful as it is a hogged mess, so I will explain as best I can.

    Length: 17-18’
    Width: 7’6
    Draft: 6” would prefer 4”
    Freeboard: 6-10” is fine
    Speed: 20-30 mph
    Three adults max

    Gear:
    Outboard 50 hp jet drive: 180 lbs.
    (if tunnel is not recommended)

    Small Center console:
    20-30 lbs.
    90 quart cooler seat:
    20 lbs.
    20 gal fuel:
    168 lbs.
    Air motor and frame:
    100 lbs.

    Gear and rigging: 500 lbs.

    Materials:
    Marine plywood composite
    Stitch and glue or ply on frame.
    Would prefer to use Epoxy as I am very familiar with it.
    All parts would be primed with Epoxy and glassed.
    Hull flotation filled.

    [​IMG]
    This would be the hull shape I would prefer. Example As shown there is no deck. Just wanted to give you a reference. It was my understanding that this boat had no tunnel and had an outboard jet drive.
     
  9. Village_Idiot
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: USA

    Village_Idiot Senior Member

    I suspect that you may be overthinking this, given your previous build experience.

    A Texas Scooter is essentially a wide surfboard with a center console and outboard mounted on it. They are made for calm water, but if you take a wave (or many) over the side, it runs right off the other side, so you essentially just need a little bow rise to keep from plowing under during forward propulsion.

    Let's say you build a craft that is 16' x 8' with a 9" hull depth. If we account for hull taper at the bow, that still puts us in the neighborhood of 85-90 cubic feet displacement. In saltwater, one cubic foot would require 64lbs to submerge it. At 85 cubic feet, this would give 5440lbs buoyancy (with no reserve buoyancy). Subtract hull weight, outboard, rigging, fuel, gear, etc., from that number to give you useful payload numbers.

    Given your load parameters above, you will be well within a safe buoyancy zone, even with a six-inch-deep hull (which would be approximately 3600lbs bouyancy). This is especially true since most of your operations will be in a few feet of water or less, save for a quick trip across the intracoastal channel. Your draft should be well less than six inches, unless you really overload the craft.

    The design seems simple enough that you could just start building, with very rudimentary, or even no, paper plans, especially given your previous experience. If in doubt, use the XF20 plans as guidelines for materials, as much of it would apply. Design doesn't have to be fancy, and I've seen a number of scooters with no hull flare at all, just a bit of bow rise.

    Be sure to add in plenty of tie-down cleats to secure your gear. With the extra weight of the fan and outboard in the back, you could move the helm a little further forward for better balance and visibility, and less overall draft.

    For reference, i built a jon boat in high school shop class. It was essentially a 4x8 sheet of ply with pine 1x12s for sides and 2x2s for stringers. I used galvanized screws, lots of epoxy glue, and everything coated with several coats of marine paint topped off with several coats of spar varnish. The boat drafted about 2" with me in it, although i only used oars for power. Enjoyed it on the local pond for a few years. Last i saw, my brother was using it as a hog trough on the farm because it was so sturdy. Built the whole thing for around $120, but that was in the early 1980s. I had no plans....just started building it and it all worked out.

    Now, if you were building this for rough water, or for someone else to use and basing your own reputation on it, then it may be a different story.

    All of this just to say, we are often much more talented than we give ourselves credit for...
     
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  10. Aransas Flats Rat
    Joined: Sep 2018
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    Location: Florida

    Aransas Flats Rat Senior Member

    Thanks Village,

    Yes I do have a great tendency to over think and overbuild lol. I needed to here that and thank you for your encouragement. I just mainly wanted some plans for perimeters on hull thickness/loads that’s were I am lacking the most. Thanks again
     
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