Help with my restoration. Nida stringers/deck

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by kpiazzisi, Oct 20, 2010.

  1. War Whoop
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    War Whoop Senior Member

    I was talking about the deck are you talking about the cockpit sole??
     
  2. kpiazzisi
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    kpiazzisi Junior Member

    It's just all one flat piece. The deck/cock pit sole are all the same thing in this boat. From the factory Regal had 3 sheets of plywood butted togeter (the seams were aligned over the bulkheads) that made up the deck/sole. Everything such as the seats are screwed down to that.
     

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  3. War Whoop
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    War Whoop Senior Member


    The Deck is the shiny part that forms the top of a boat also keeps the sun and water out IE Hull and Deck,The cockpit sole is the part you walk on,Now Coosa would be fine there,But I would still glass both sides.
     
  4. kpiazzisi
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    kpiazzisi Junior Member

    OK....sorry for the confusion. I meant the sole then. I have been fiberglassing today. What a slow messy, sticky process. The wife and kids are gone for 8 days, so things are going to finally start to take shape.
     
  5. kpiazzisi
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    kpiazzisi Junior Member

    To foam or not to foam

    I know there is a lot of debate on this one. I am considering weather or not to put the flotation foam back into the boat. Originally Regal had airtight compartments filled with foam. I thought about filling the same compartments with foam with the exception of making a drain hole just in case somehow water gets into the compartment. What do you think?
     

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  6. War Whoop
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    War Whoop Senior Member

    LOL lots of luck remember the game is about your abilities as a Taylor.
     
  7. War Whoop
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    War Whoop Senior Member

    What I did was to foam in large pieces of Styrofoam in a few boats overseas,I was worried about the 2 part foam wicking up water and wanted to reduce the amount of pour foam to a minimum. Oh wax your foam buckets and get them back.
     
  8. kpiazzisi
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    kpiazzisi Junior Member

    I am almost ready for the floor/sole. I have a question about adding floor support over the gas tank. The largest span I have on the floor is over the gas tank. I think the Nida board will have some flex or be springy over this section if I do not add support. I am thinking about gluing or fiberglassing a 2 inch PVC pipe perpendicular to the gas tank floor. The holes in the tank would then slide through the pipe. The pipe would add floor support. Would this work?
     

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    Last edited: Nov 26, 2010
  9. War Whoop
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    War Whoop Senior Member

    What is the thickness of the Nida core? Remember panel Width is the problem and with a thin core there can be stiffness issues Example ,if you have a 1/2" cored panel and exchange it for a 1" core your stiffness does not just double but goes up better than a cube ,like 37 times in some cases ,so maybe doubling the core over the tank will help.
     
  10. kpiazzisi
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    kpiazzisi Junior Member

    I am using 16 mm Nida. I do not have enough clearance to double the floor over the tank.


    I am now a believer in the sandwich theory (core with laminate on both sides) . I drove to Composites One to buy the 1/2 inch Coosa Bluewater. I loaded it into the boat and notice that it was very springy. They then brought out the 3/4 thickness which was stiffer, but way heavier and more expensive. The 3/4 Coosa felt comparable in stiffness to the Nida panels I already used on the stringers. The Nida is much lighter, so I made the decision to stick with the Nida. I did buy one one sheet of Coosa for the transom, because I need a material with compression strength in that area.
     
  11. War Whoop
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    War Whoop Senior Member

    You may need to increase the glass skins in the tank area then.
     
  12. kpiazzisi
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    kpiazzisi Junior Member

    I was planning on using two layers of biax 12 oz (0, 90) on each side with epoxy. So you are not liking my idea to add a support through the two holes in the tank?
     
  13. War Whoop
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    War Whoop Senior Member


    No the support is fine given the criteria of the area, 24 oz of fabric should work.
     
  14. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Bear in mind, that these pipes have a thin wall, which makes the load distribution possibly too "sharp". Much load concentrated on a small surface.
    Your panel stiffness is easy to calculate for a comparison. Given the material you use is of equal and homogenous quality, you just calculate by the cubic #. I.e. 6x6x6 = 216 and 8x8x8 = 512, which is more than twice as stiff. (metric)
    3/4in is 3 times stiffer than 1/2in.
     

  15. kpiazzisi
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    kpiazzisi Junior Member

    I understand that the panel gets stiffer exponentially with thickness, but I have already purchased the 16mm Nida-core and would like to make it work if possible. Another part of the stiffness equation is how much laminate is on each side correct?

    I don't know how stiff the 16mm panel is going to be once it's laminated. The first panels I made (before I understood the power of biax and epoxy) were made with 1.5 mat on both sides with Polyester Resin. Believe it or not, the material is pretty stiff.

    Here is the question, do you think the panels I am planning on making with 24 oz biax and epoxy resin will be any stiffer then the panels I made earlier out of the polyester resin and the 1.5 oz mat. I am assuming 1.5 oz mat translate to 13.5 oz per yard? So in addition to using a better fiberglass and epoxy there will also be more glass on the new panels. They should be a lot stiffer ....correct?
     
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