Help me with my new boat? (:

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Bens, May 13, 2009.

  1. Bens
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 2
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    Location: Wootton Bassett

    Bens New Member

    Hey everybody,
    I'v been looking through this forum for just a little while and have seen some interesting yet complicated stuff. :confused: At this moment in time i have started a process of designing a boat, but i am very uncertian how to go about it due to costs/realistic building space. So i will lay down some specifications here and i'd really appreciate it if you could maybe show me some links of similar boats or plans etc. so here is goes.

    1) Looking for the boat to be about 12-15ft Long (if you could tell me the average width of a 12-15ft boat? not very sure.
    2) It will be used to sailing around British coastline, not very far out at sea. Nor for long durations.
    3) I want it to have a downstairs in it (with like a bed etc, dry place basically)
    4) I want it to be made out of wood, probably be epoxy'd.
    5) Is it possible to have electricals in a self built wooden boat?
    6) It will need to be engine run.
    7) How realistic are my goals? The downstairs on the boat i'd like to have a bed, mabe even a cooker, sink etc.
    8) Is a 12-15ft boat too small to have a well designed, functional downstairs interior?

    Price isn't a huge issue because i'll be doing the project over a long period of time with financial backing. Any information would be greatly appreiciated.

    Cheeers

    Ben Seward.
     
  2. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: OREGON

    rasorinc Senior Member

    Go to this site and click on boat building plans then on sailboats. they have many plans from 8' to 60'. Look at the ones in your size then go up in size until you find the ammenities you want in a boat. You can also look at powerboats. you will have to go longer than 15' to get what you want.
    http://www.glen-l.com/
     
  3. Guest625101138

    Guest625101138 Previous Member

    A 12ft sailing boat with a cabin is usually classed a micro-cruiser. There is some discussion here:
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/12-micro-cruiser-called-c-bee-22944-2.html
    and here:
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/british-coastal-micro-cruiser-22112-2.html

    You can see these are snug to state the obvious. Even 15ft is small for something with a cabin. Probably 17ft is getting more realistic for a trailer sailer. Something like this:
    http://www.caleyboats.co.uk/125/Sail-Craft-for-Sale/Skipper-17-Trailer-Sailer-with
    but with developable shape.

    Here are plans for a 15 footer:
    http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jim/musicbox3/index.htm
    You will find heaps more on the duckworks site.

    I suggest you consider standard plans unless you really want to go through a long learning curve and likely plenty of rework.

    Hopefully this gives you somewhere to start and I am sure there are others who can give more specific information.

    If your interest is sailing rather than building then the second hand market in this range can have absolute bargains.

    Rick W
     
  4. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    Hi Ben, welcome aboard the forum :)

    It looks like you've got a start on the requirements. This is a good place to begin. Jumping straight into drawings without a clear idea of what the boat needs to do may produce pretty pictures, but not a good boat.

    Now, some of your requirements may not jive too well. The main conflict: British coastline capability and a place to sleep, versus an overall length of 12 to 15 feet. A 12' boat is about the length of a Mini Cooper, and can't be made any wider or taller than a Mini Cooper and still be able to get out of its own way. If you don't mind living like John Glenn in the Mercury space capsule, this *might* be doable. If you care about your sanity while at sea, I think you will have to look at something slightly larger. If you go up to 14-16' there is an OK choice of stock plans, your choice of sail or power designs, that include a cramped but usable cabin.

    Wood-epoxy construction is a well established method. It demands some patience but is not overly complicated, and can result in a good hull at a good price.

    Some examples of boats that might be what you're thinking of:

    Adelie 14 - about as small as a coastal cruiser can get and still carry a fully sane man - http://bateau.com/proddetail.php?prod=AD14 , there's also a longer model http://bateau.com/proddetail.php?prod=AD16

    Glen-L Minuet 15 - https://www.boatdesigns.com/products.asp?dept=459

    Or if you prefer power: Glen-L Cruisette 15 - https://www.boatdesigns.com/products.asp?dept=391

    There are quite a few more designs out there at around 15' that have a bit of cabin space (although not much- remember, the whole boat is only about as big as a family station wagon) and, in good hands, should be somewhat seaworthy near the coast.

    I concur with Rick that stock plans are the way to start. To use myself as an example: Back in 2000-01, I built my runabout based on plans from Phil Bolger. After seven years of using (and modifying) that boat, and five years of engineering school, along with four years worth of help from this forum and several complete readings of a heap of math-heavy textbooks on hydrodynamics, naval architecture, yacht structure, etc., I now feel comfortable starting on my own design (with a bit of guidance). It's a long, steep learning curve- and a rewarding one- but the first step is to start with something tried and true.
     
  5. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: OREGON

    rasorinc Senior Member

    Well in less then an hour you have received a lot of info to digest. One thing I will add is do not design a hull. Buy plans for the hull size you want and make topside changes and interior changes. It will save you a lot of anguish.
     
  6. Scott Hunter S
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 1
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    Location: Ohio

    Scott Hunter S New Member

    I am new to this so I hope I am not breaking any rules. I have read the responces to Ben's question and appreciate the advice. I getting started on building a pirouge, but am planning my next (year) project. I plan to design an 18' LOA with 15' LWL and approx. 5' beam. I can't figure out where the beam should be in relation to the stem and bow. It will be a flat bottom sailboat. Yhank you for any help I might get.
     
  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This is one of my designs and is a true open water boat with accommodations. It's also available in shoal draft and with two alternate rigs (Bermudian sloop and gaff schooner). It can be built taped seam, multi chine or round bilge (strip planked or molded). It's not a speed demon, but will take the worst that coastal cruising can dish out and bring you home safe, plus it has the storage capacity to carry the things you need for cruising.

    You can get designs smaller then this, but they're little more then day boats with a cuddy. These are fine for avoiding a quick rain shower, but not much else as they usually lack storage space, headroom, etc.

    Considering the basic nature of your questions, you're no where near capable of designing a boat yet (no offense intended). With some study, maybe a course or two, you could acquire this knowledge, but this will take some time.

    Searching for a design that suits your needs is a long process if done properly. It's easy to build a boat that you'll hate to sail or doesn't fit your desires. If you execute your search with focus and a priority list, you'll eventually find a design that best suits your needs and build preferences.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Bens
    Joined: May 2009
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    Location: Wootton Bassett

    Bens New Member

    Cheers, the information i have been given is so so so helpful i have learn't a lot already. Par, i really like that boat design you posted above, do you have any more? Like specifications etc because that is pretty much what i want!! would you be able to private message me for more information about it?

    Cheers

    Ben.
     

  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 484, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Click on my name and send me an email.
     
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