Help me calculate

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by Wemdoug, Dec 15, 2009.

  1. Wemdoug
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 22
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    Location: Nigeria

    Wemdoug Junior Member

    Hello all im new in the tread. I am designing a barge and i need to know how to calculate the pressure of water acting on the wall of the barge. Please any body with more experience should help.
    Thanks
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Hire an NA or at least an engineer that's familiar with not only these types of calculations, but the realities of structural considerations, especially in the marine environment. This isn't something you just want to hack through and hope for the best.
     
  3. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    PAR, Wemdoug is writing from Nigeria. What would you recommend he/she

    do if a naval architect or engineer cannot be hired for any number of

    reasons. Just build it anyway and hope for the best? Not building it may

    not be an option.

    -Tom
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 488, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I did mention an engineer. This stuff isn't especially hard, but does take some discipline and study. An engineer will have already shown this ability and will have the sense to preform the research necessary, to get the information they need. In fact, research is the hallmark of a good engineer, be that marine or otherwise. Hoping for the best is an option and unfortunately, one taken all too often in this part of the world. Maybe one more time will not get anyone killed. I wonder what the odds would be . . .

    In short, I've done work for clients in Africa and I wasn't the first. One of my ferry designs is carrying passengers (probably overloaded too) on Lake Mbakaou, north of the Pangar reserve in Cameroon. It's not like it can't be done.
     
  5. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    Water pressure at sea level increases by about a half pound per square inch for each foot of immersion. Thus each square foot of hull surface averaging one foot of depth should contribute about 70+ lbs of inward pressure. According to my rough calculations. I think.
     

  6. Wemdoug
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 22
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    Location: Nigeria

    Wemdoug Junior Member

    Thankyou everyone i found the answer in a fluid mechanics text book. The topic is Hydrostatic force on surface. I appriciate all ur efforts to help thanks.
    Wemdoug
     
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