HELP leaks

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by tx-scooter, Jun 3, 2009.

  1. tx-scooter
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: west texas

    tx-scooter Junior Member

    hi going to post pics now.
    im from west texas so dont know proper boat terms so this may get confusing to you'll.
    this is a lapstrake, the 1x4 board inside is completely rotted and gone. the bottom lap is partially rotted away. tha 1/2x2 board outside is in fairly good shape, other than all screws are epoxy faired over. now the big question how to fix,hopfully without completely rebuilding boat. all rotten wood has been removed,remaining wood treated with borate solution.
    my thought is seal outside to bottom lap with bead of 5200,then build up inside with thickend epoxy,after either removing or cutting off screws.then with 1/4" plywoodcoated in cpes, add fresh epoxy between plywood and inside of bottom lap and screw from outside in threw outside 1/2x2, threw bottom lap and into 1/4 ply.then a good coat of epoxy primer outside followed by topcoat.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 490, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I rebuild quite a few lapstrakes and your "method" will not work for very long.

    Your boat appears (can't really tell by close ups of rotted areas) to have a batten seam bottom, possibly with a reversed lap and a riveted lap topsides. I've seen a few of these and the weakness is usually in the chines, where the batten seam construction meets the riveted lapstrake.

    To fix your problems you have to find out what's wrong. Yep, you know about the rot, but this is the end result of a likely a few different things. The usual suspects are loose fasteners in the structure and planking. This is fairly common among riveted lapstrakes. As the fasteners stretch and get loose, things start to move (frames, planks, etc.) which lets in water, then rot sets in and things go down hill from there.

    Covering things up with goo in a tube isn't going to fix anything. It might mask it for a year or so, but underneath it'll still be rotting away.

    You have to remove the rotted areas, all of it or it just comes back. Replace these pieces with good wood, then most importantly fix what caused the downward spiral in the first place.

    Planks are not as tough to replace as it might seam. If you're neat about it, you can use the old plank as a pattern to make a new one.

    Don't use epoxy of any kind (including CPES) on this boat. The planks must be able to expand and contract with moisture content. If you slather plastic goo all over it, the wood can't do this and you'll have bigger troubles.

    Frankly it sounds like you need bottom planks and probably the turn of the bilge lapped plank as well, plus some structural repairs to the chine logs, maybe some frames, just to make things right again. I'm not talking about full up restoration, just repairs.

    At this point I don't know enough about the boat to comment further. Can you post some photos showing how it's built, the make, model, year, etc.?
     
  3. tx-scooter
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: west texas

    tx-scooter Junior Member

    1965 barbour

    it has laps held by brass screws. it had screws go threw topside, threw lap, and into batten
     

    Attached Files:

  4. tx-scooter
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: west texas

    tx-scooter Junior Member

    btt

    any more input
     
  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 15,770
    Likes: 1,197, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Laps with screws are not too difficult to take appart. As Par says, the only proper long lasting repair is to take ALL the rotted wood away and replace it. Use the old pieces as patterns.
     
  6. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Well, there is no more input possible!

    You should provide more and better pictures , descriptions of your problem zones. I doubt your screws are brass! Maybe bronce? Do some deeper investigation before you cry out beeing lost. And be patient.......................................................... Mr. Riccelli gave you the first hints.... personally! The (by far) best advisor I´ve seen on the Internet if it comes to boat restoration. I must not always be of the same opinion though.

    Regards
    Richard
     
  7. tx-scooter
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: west texas

    tx-scooter Junior Member

    sorry to have wasted your time

    as i stated in first post i know nothing of wooden boats and their is probably not another one within 300 miles or more. i have checked with several boat shops not a one will even discuss a wooden boat with me. sorry for the wrong term, brass- bronze, and for wasting all of your time.:confused: yes have read many of PAR's post and know he a knowledable person.i guess i dont even know what pics to post,these pics are the trouble spot and i have the floor up and this is the only rotted spot in the boat, the rotten batten on the inside where the bottom and last lap join.
     
  8. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Calm down,
    nobody asks you for expert explanations! We know you are not. You cannot waste our time! We give it for free, or we leave it.
    Just a plain overview of the troublesome area, a closeup of the planks, (in and outside), a broad overview of the framing, that would help a lot.

    Regards
    Richard
     
  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 490, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Do you have a year, make and model for the boat?

    Take some photos of the inside as a whole shot, from the stern, so we can see how things attach.

    Some of the under side to see if it's reversed lap (not very common). Other areas would include wide angles of the chine, inside and out, keel, stem, transom framing, etc.

    What does the steering wheel say on it? How about the gauges, etc. These might give you a clue about what she is.

    Looking at your last photo, she looks to not have any laps on the bottom. I wounder if Holmes (Texas wooden boat builder) built a lapped cruiser.
     

  10. tx-scooter
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: west texas

    tx-scooter Junior Member

    she is a 1965 Barbour

    she was made New Bern N. Carolina, she has laps to chine.bottom is solid wood or plywood not sure.after Pars comments it maybe too late for her, seems the more i probe around on her the more fiberglass i find and also the more rot. wondering if she might have laid on her starbord side as all rot in the chine area is on this side, port side looks good no rot other than last couple inches of stringers.after digging all the rotten wood away in the bottom lap chine area,including inside batten, i'm to 1 thin layer of fiberglass-paint.up from chine to bottom of first lap about 3",completely gone.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. West Denny 33
    Replies:
    19
    Views:
    1,615
  2. JonnyBoat
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    1,260
  3. cdubb
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    2,953
  4. corkobo
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    1,971
  5. Jeff Weems
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,224
  6. StandedInMx
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    2,144
  7. nbehlman
    Replies:
    35
    Views:
    3,175
  8. urisvan
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    2,904
  9. bdelnas98@gmail
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    4,019
  10. nc2sea
    Replies:
    28
    Views:
    6,825
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.