Help building a wooden flat bottom!

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Wolfgang123, Feb 21, 2010.

  1. Wolfgang123
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 42
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Atlanta

    Wolfgang123 Junior Member

    Hi guys so i am looking into building a wooden flat bottom jon boat. i have a questions about wood mostly. I have access to white wood (wood at lowes) and pressure treated wood (again at lowes) thats about all i have sence i live in the middle of a large city. would these wood be ok to use? i was think there might be some kind of paint that could seal the wood and make it just as good as marine ply wood. any ideas?

    Thanks
    Wolgang
     
  2. Wolfgang123
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 42
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Atlanta

    Wolfgang123 Junior Member

    ok so i have not started yet but i was thinking i would make the whole thing out of white wood execpt for the floor, i will use pressure treated there. First i would paint with this:

    http://www.jamestowndistributors.co...familyName=Pettit Old Salem 2018 Clear Sealer

    after say 2 coats of the above i will put on 2 coats of:

    http://www.gulfstreamshop.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=426&PartnerID=2

    then paint with say 2 coats of general use spray paint just for color? what do you guys think?

    EDIT:

    or do you think i should just do 3 coats of this:

    http://www.jamestowndistributors.co...familyName=Pettit Old Salem 2018 Clear Sealer

    then spray paint it?
     
  3. Wolfgang123
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 42
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Atlanta

    Wolfgang123 Junior Member

    http://vimeo.com/7049070

    thats the way i plan to build my boat how ever i plan to make a couple adjustments to measurements and stuff to make it more stable and less box looking. i also plan to make it wider.
     
  4. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 2,329
    Likes: 126, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1603
    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    1: Standard exterior grade plywood will never be as good as marine grade. Marine grade (contrary to the video) normally has MORE plies and the plies are guaranteed to have absolutely the minimum of internal holes or VOIDS. The glue is guaranteed to be water proof and will not let go even after boiling.
    That said...you can build that boat out of regular exterior grade plywood...just expect it not to last like marine ply would.

    2: I would never use gorilla glue and I would definitely try NOT to use Poplar...that glue has proven to NOT be very good for building boats. Use PL Premium or Epoxy instead. They are both less expensive as well as being proven better. Poplar is not a rot resistant wood, you would be better off with pine or fir. Your generic white wood is quite likely to be poplar or aspen or some other non rot resistant wood.
    That being said...If you don't have expectations of the boat lasting to pass onto your grand kids, and you protect it while in storage (no wet leaves inside, prompt covering of scratches after a thorough drying out of the affected area, covering from the elements while allowing it to breath, etc) and you use a decent paint like exterior porch paint, barn paint or tractor paint, with a good primer...use what is available for wood. Take the building process in the video with a big grain of salt...the guy is clearly a house builder/carpenter pressed into building a box boat. He routinely uses the wrong term for basic boat parts (any knowledgeable boat builder would know these) and clearly shows no proper knowledge of boat building techniques. There is not enough rocker (upward curve) to the bottom of the bow and the bow transom will slap into the face of even the smallest of waves or wakes from other boats. The bottom of the boat is really too thick...3/8" to 1/2" would be fine and quite a bit lighter. The (Red) Oak rub rails and runners he used will soak up water like a bundle of straws...much better to use Douglas Fir (cheaper too). The 3 deg flare aft would be much better if it were around 10 degrees...3 deg is about useless as far as adding heeled stability (or buoyancy). What is shown is the very most basic of floating boxes...much can be done to this with only a little bit more effort. You won't really want to get too much wider across the bottom...it will be a b!tch to handle out of the water and will need a larger motor to push around. 12' long x 4' wide are good dimensions for the bottom and you can widen it across the top to about 4'10" without too much trouble.

    3: don't let anyone else fool you...you can still have fun with regular box store wood boats...just remember that the quality isn't up to most folks around here's standards and it won't probably won't last as long as the higher quality materials would.
     
  5. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
    Posts: 3,731
    Likes: 121, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1404
    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    I agree with lewisboats. The designer and builder in the video appears to know little if nothing of boat terminology, meaning his lack of exposure to those terms also indicates a lack of exposure to boat-building in general.
    Agreed about the glue, which is not correct (meaning effective over time) for underwater applications.
    Poplar, also mentioned as a poor choice, is brittle (especially as sold in a very dry state). It has poor rot-resistance compared to other available woods.
    The term, "white wood" is a marketing term and doesn't belong in any discussion about boat wood since it includes a lot of woods having very different characteristics. Let's talk cedar, pine, fir, yellow pine, and spruce for starters, since all are available nearly everywhere in the US and each will potentially serve some need in the building of A cheap boat.
    There's not enough curve to the bow as said. Not enough flare to the sides in my opinion, and the method show of attaching the stern at 3 degrees is absurd if the same angle hasn't been built into the side/bottom angle.
    I could go on, but my point is that if one wants to build a jon boat, the best course of action would be to ask the right people what is a good jon boat designer or a designer who has architected one, and then proceed to build it with forum help, which is plentiful and free.
    Using good wood and proper methods, the result will be a boat that can last a long time and serve its purpose well.
     
  6. Wolfgang123
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 42
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Atlanta

    Wolfgang123 Junior Member

    ok thanks guys, i could tell by watching the video that it wasnt the best way to go.

    - so i will use pine (all i can get my hand on) instead of white wood

    - this for "glue": http://www.simplicityboats.com/pl_premium.htm

    - at 14:00 i plan to do the 10 degrees instead of 3

    - 1x12 as sides, 2x12s for the transom and front (i plan to use steel plate to brace these even more), the bottom is 3/8 inch plywood, screwed and glued front,sides, and back... and to the spreader in the middle and in the back of the boat. For the front of the boat should i cut a 10 degree offset like i would do for the transon and middle support? or should i just add the front on like in the video and just cut it to match up where ever the bends of the boat fall naturally?

    - at 0:27 in the video i plan to do a 5 inch offset instead of the 3 he did (more or less what do you guys think?)...then come back 26 inches instead of 24 inches and make the 1 inch offset a 2 inch offset (good, bad?)

    - at 7:54 in the video to make the arc i was thinking about a cinder block with a 2x4 on top of the block to form the arc instead of just a 2x4 (again too much too little?)
     
  7. Wolfgang123
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 42
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Atlanta

    Wolfgang123 Junior Member

    ok i was thinking of JUST 2 coats of this nothing else:

    http://paint-and-supplies.hardwarestore.com/60-351-deck-and-siding-stain/thompson''s-waterseal-deck-and-house-oil-stain-615387.aspx?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=615387&utm_campaign=googlebase

    thats what my dad used on our deck like 4 years ago (2 coats) and it is still like new and we use the deck alot.

    thoughts?

    i read that you werent suppose to prime with deck paint or any kind of high traaffic surface becuase primer is soft and chips easily.
     
  8. The copper guy
    Joined: Feb 2010
    Posts: 85
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Back in the UK

    The copper guy Junior Member

    Hiya m8
    If you are looking to have fun with the boat in the water, Go for it.
    In Canada they have a nice tradition of building a Schooner for Les than $1000 and in 4hrs or so.
    But if you want something to be proud of and show off but never put in the water?
    The best thing is in the middle, Basically if you dobell the cost of the materials you will
    Trippel the life expectancy.
     
  9. Wolfgang123
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 42
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Atlanta

    Wolfgang123 Junior Member

    i am going to build one no question. i coulnt care less how it looks
     
  10. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,453
    Likes: 214, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Only one of many suppliers of plans. The garvey is a simple nice type to do.
     
  11. WesS
    Joined: Jan 2010
    Posts: 33
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Tennessee

    WesS Junior Member

  12. Wolfgang123
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 42
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Atlanta

    Wolfgang123 Junior Member

    thats cool but out of my price range. i would be better off buying a boat.

    i think i am going to just take my new measurements posted above and just try and see what happens i am having a hard time finding plans that are free and worth a crap. so we will see
     
  13. uncleralph
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 17
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: USA

    uncleralph Junior Member

  14. Wolfgang123
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 42
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Atlanta

    Wolfgang123 Junior Member


  15. Wolfgang123
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 42
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Atlanta

    Wolfgang123 Junior Member

    there again i was hoping to add a 15hp surface drive to it. so i might need to fiberglass...the problem is those boat plans dont list for more than 10hp on the transom.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. fixtheboat
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,502
  2. raffshore
    Replies:
    16
    Views:
    3,012
  3. cdb5015
    Replies:
    24
    Views:
    6,165
  4. robertgrandbois
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,406
  5. crose
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,758
  6. TatTude
    Replies:
    16
    Views:
    16,326
  7. cdubb
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    232
  8. corkobo
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    923
  9. Jeff Weems
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    744
  10. StandedInMx
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    1,117
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.