Helm/ Dash restore

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by WyattG, Oct 30, 2010.

  1. WyattG
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Sierra Nevada Foothills Ca

    WyattG New Member

    i have a late 80's early 90 fiberglass speedboat and i want to freshen up the dash/helm.
    it appears that the white gelcoat was painted in flat black by the mfg (it was the in-thing during that era for this type of vessel) and i want to redo.
    What are my choices and what are your recommendations?
    Not sure if i want to deal with gel coat. I have repainted my bilge in awlgrip and it came out well about 4 years ago but the dash/helm is a different story as i would like to have a nice shinny smooth finish.
    can i roll this type of paint on (i know it sounds tacky) or will i need to spray.
    Also, should i worry about the work during this time of year. Even though my local temp is very mild compared to most, my temps for the next 60 days will dip as low as 50, but then in the 20-30's in Jan. CAn i start now or should i wait?
    Thanks
    WG
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If you want a smooth paint job then the prep is the key. You'll need to block it down, fill any low spots, knock off the high spots and the usual prep for a good paint job. If we're talking about just a instrument panel or other small area, you're best bet would be aerosol paint in a can. Most of these dry quickly enough to take advantage of a fairly warm day. You can also keep an area warm with a small tarp and a heater.

    You can use a technique called "roll and tip" though a well handled spray can will have better results in most cases on a small area. Personally, I wouldn't pother with an LPU (Awlgrip and similar), besides you're not going to need anywhere near a quart, so a lot of costly paint will be wasted. A single part polyurethane will do just fine and cost a lot less.
     
  3. WyattG
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Sierra Nevada Foothills Ca

    WyattG New Member

    PAR,
    spray can it is.
    any suggested Polyur mfg better than others?
    thank you
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 488, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Stick with the major brands, but no I don't have a particular preference.
     

  5. missinginaction
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 1,055
    Likes: 225, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 512
    Location: New York

    missinginaction Senior Member

    I'd agree with the "paint in a can" approach. I'm thinking that since this is a dash panel why not use some automotive touch up paint and clear coat it? I've had good luck with some of the online suppliers of auto paint or you could just go to a dealer and order a can of primer, a can of basecoat and a can of clearcoat. Probably cost less than $50.00

    My 1996 Chevrolet Suburban still shines after sitting ouside for most of the past 14 years. It's clearcoat has been subjected to a lot more UV than the dash panel of a boat ever would see (since I'm assuming the boat will be covered). I do take good care of my old truck but modern automotive paints are very durable.

    FWIW, I've used leftover Interlux Epoxy Prime Coat (404) as a primer on my truck and overcoated with autobase and clearcoat with excellent result. I rolled and tipped the Interlux and then sanded smooth down to 600 grit. Shot it with base coat and clear and bingo.....done.

    MIA
     
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