Hello & Westlawn vs YDS

Discussion in 'Education' started by Mark Robinson, Oct 23, 2002.

  1. luckettg
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    luckettg Junior Member

    That's quite a list Dave :) Thankyou! I have started working my way through it to see what I can discover on the net. That Italian designer you referred to in another referenced thread and who is also on this list, Massimo Gregori, does not seem to have much information on the web except at Westlawn's website....at least not that I have found yet. I am hoping to find websites and information that are not also on the Westlawn site, and have indeed found some. This should keep me busy for a year or so....LOL

    Online and correspondence type training is becoming more acceptable, such as the University of Phoenix. Westlawn seems even more credible to me than that, especially with the affiliation with ABYC. Too bad it does not yet have the ability to grant degrees which would be recognized by the college and university accredidation systems, such as SASAC or MWASAC. Any plans or hope for this in the near future?
    Thanks,
    Greg Luckett
     
  2. dgerr
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    dgerr Senior Member

    Aah . . . there are some things in the works. We may have some interesting announcements next year. Stay tuned . . .

    Dave Gerr
     
  3. CDBarry
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    CDBarry Senior Member

    A very good general and reasonably priced book on structures (though it emphasizes welded steel) is Blodgett's "Design of Welded Structures" from the Lincoln Foundation:

    https://ssl.lincolnelectric.com/lincoln/apdirect/item.asp?prodnum=DWS

    It is intended for mainly non-engineers, but it will explain, and allow you to calculate, things like "section modulus", which is required for NVIC 11-80, ABS or the ISO rules. (Note that NVICs can be downloaded free from www.uscg.mil, and ABS rules from www.eagle.org.)
     
  4. luckettg
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    luckettg Junior Member

    Thanks for the links!!:)
    Greg Luckett
     
  5. dgerr
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    dgerr Senior Member

    Couldn’t agree more. Omar Blodgett’s "Design of Welded Structures" is excellent! The USCG NVICs on steel, on aluminum, and on fiberglass construction are very valuable as well. Sadly, the traditional wooden-boat construction NVIC has been pulled long ago, but if you can find a copy around it’s useful. (NVIC, by the way, stands for “Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular.”)

    For a good understanding of the basic concepts of strengths of materials you can look at:

    “Applied Statics and Strengths of Materials,” 4th Edition, by Leonard Spiegel & George F. Limbruner.

    The original classic reference on fiberglass design (now out of print and hard to find) is:

    “Design Manual for Fiberglass Reinforced Plastics,” by Gibbs & Cox.

    Dave Gerr
    Director
    Westlawn Institute of Marine Technology
     
  6. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Can you give a more precise indication of where the NVICs can be downloaded? A search of the coast guards site didn't turn much up. Thanks
     
  7. dgerr
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    dgerr Senior Member

    The USCG URL for NVICs is:

    http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/nvic/index.htm

    as posted for Westlawn students on the Westlawn Student Forum.

    Though many of the NVICs don’t apply to small-craft, there are important NVICs that do provide very useful information for the small-craft designer or builder.

    At: http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/nvic/index80.htm

    you’ll find:

    “Structural Plan Review Guidelines for Aluminum Small Passenger Vessels”

    and

    “Notes on Design, Construction, Inspection and Repair of Fiber Reinforced Plastic (FRP) Vessels With Change Included”

    Though focused largely on ships, “Notes on Inspection and Repair of Steel Hulls” is also useful for designers and builders of steel small-craft, at:

    http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/nvic/indexold.htm

    Dave Gerr
    Director
    Westlawn Institute of Marine Technology
     
  8. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Thanks Dave
    p.s. still plugging away on my final exam....
     
  9. joz
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    joz Senior Member

    "Aah . . . there are some things in the works. We may have some interesting announcements next year. Stay tuned . . ."

    Mr Gerr

    does that mean that westlawn will be degree quilified? also will the costs go up if that is the case? and will the size of the vessels will increase 200+ feet LOA that is taught as part of your program?
     
  10. westlawn5554X
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    westlawn5554X STUDENT

    Happy and sad... happy because I could get a degree possible more work than a fat cow jumping the fence and sad cause school fee might rise. Got to work harder now dont we.
     
  11. CDBarry
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    CDBarry Senior Member

    An other source for a lot of free downloadable stuff, though mainly oriented toward large ships, is the Ship Structure Committee, www.shipstructure.org SSC 360 and 403, especially, are good guides for fiberglass. A lot of the other reports, though have significant information that is more generally useful for smaller vessels.
     
  12. Seafra
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    Seafra Sailing Nerd

    Dgerr,

    Your cryptic statement:

    ...has certainly piqued my interest. I understand that you may be reluctant to divulge the full extent of your plans but I believe you'd be able to answer a more pointed question.

    Would this possible new developement of your core curriculum in anyway affect a student who is currently enrolled or graduated? Would they be allowed to integrate their completed course work into the revised framework?

    -Ben H.
     
  13. dgerr
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    dgerr Senior Member

    Yes, it's too early to say more about the new options we are working on for Westlawn students. We plan to announce the details in the next year or so. Be assured, however, that all current Westlawn students and all Westlawn graduates will be able to take full advantage of the new options, with full credit for all their past Westlawn work and with no changes in their Westlawn work.

    Dave Gerr
    Director
    Westlawn Institute of Marine Technology
     
  14. edneu
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    edneu Junior Member

    George Washington Carver

    Someone suggested previously that look George Washington Carver accomplished so much and didn't even have a degree. While I agree that a degree is not any measure of sucess, G.W. Carver is a bad example of that point.

    For purposes of Historical accuracy:

    George Washington Carver was admitted as the first black student of Simpson College, Indianola, Iowa. He then attended Iowa Agricultural College (now Iowa State University) where, while working as the school janitor, he received a degree in agricultural science in 1894. Two years later he received a master's degree from the same school and became the first African American to serve on its faculty. He later became a faculty member of Tuskeegee Institute.

    Cheers,
     

  15. luckettg
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    luckettg Junior Member

    Teach me to go by memory from watching the History Channel.....the point that they kept pushing was that he never earned a degree, but was given honorary degrees...(or something to that effect) due to being so accomplished. Maybe I have him confused with someone else? He also would not take better paying jobs at other schools, but instead kept teaching and working where he was.
    Greg Luckett
     
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