Hello & Westlawn vs YDS

Discussion in 'Education' started by Mark Robinson, Oct 23, 2002.

  1. JonH
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    JonH Junior Member

    http://www.macnaughtongroup.com/school.htm


    No idea, sorry.

    Yes, yes, I'm not sure that any CAD software has a low learning curve but the tutorials with Rhino are fairly effective. IMHO it's worth taking a course rather than trying to teach yourself.
     
  2. sailaweigh
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    sailaweigh Junior Member

    I think I remember reading somewhere that Westlawn uses Prosurf from New Wave Systems. Maybe Dave Gerr could respond to this?
     
  3. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Westlawn doesn't require the use of any particular software - it's entirely up to the student.
    Having said that, they suggest that as both Rhino and in particular AutoCAD are essentially industry standard that you really should consider them as the starting point. As far as your hull fairing software goes you can use whatever you want.
    The only requirement is that your lesson submissions can be opened by the software that the school itself uses - so .dwg, .dxf format. It would be wise to check with them before you race out and buy anything though.
    Getting a head start with using CAD is an excellent idea. For about 1/2 the course you must submit your lessons electronically. This came in about 1/2 way thru my studies, and getting up to speed with the use of CAD was, for me, the most challenging aspect of it.
     
  4. CaptScot
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    CaptScot Junior Member

    CaptScot

    Hello Will,
    Sounds like good advice and basically is what I wanted to know. Hearing it from someone who's already taking the course is great too. I do intend to apply to Westlawn, probably by the fall. I know drafting, but nothing of CAD. So I'm kind of chomping at the bit to dabble in it soon, plus the life-like renderings look incredible. Since there's a learning curve with any CAD- like software I'd just like to be on the right track instead of re-inventing the wheel once enrolled. Like you that will probably be my biggest challenge; maybe Rhino is the way to go. I will contact the school to find out, thanks.

    By the way, I know there are less expensive, but yet reputable YD schools out there. However, I believe Westlawn must rate at the top. It is an old established school, most of the administration work for, or are members of, ABYC; the industry standard. Westlawn is affliated with NMMA (National Marine Manufacturers Assoc). And when I spoke to different members of the Soc. of Naval Architects & Marine Engineers (SNAME) each said Westlawn was a very good school. Lastly, while researching my career move I spoke will the head architect at Sparkman & Stevens in NY who also was impressed with the school and graduates. So aside from the steep tuition I think its a win, win to have Westlawn on one's a resume. Having completed a year your eligable to join SNAME as a student member. That too looks great on a resume.

    Thanks again, Scott
     
  5. twakeley
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    twakeley NAME Student

    university perspective..

    Hello, I'm new to the site. My name is Trevor Wakeley and I'm a student at the University of New Orleans in the N.A.M.E program. I've kept tabs on this discussion because I'm not 100% on what I want to do when I get out of college. I've always wanted to design yachts, however I hear that its rather hard to get into unless you know people in the industry.

    Are any of you far enough along to have made inquiries to yacht companies as to how they view Westlawn and YDS vs a 4 year degree? Do any of you have NAME degrees and are also doing one of the online programs?

    I'm not very far into the curriculum.. but maybe this will help someone out. I don't think you can compare the classroom experience to an online "teacher". I recently completed a linesplan for a 325' Patrol boat and I dont think it would have been possible without one on one help with the instructor and classmates. This was in an introductory class too.. (sophomore year). I think the biggest issues are cost and time, which are obviously huge considerations if you have to support a family or something. There are tons of prerequisites that you need to get out of the way to take the higher design courses that you seem to have jumped right into.

    How much of your online couse is physics/calculus based? Are their complex statics/dynamics calculations where you actually need some of the crap I'm taking like Multi-variable calculus? Also would it benefit me to do a westlawn or YDS after I get my degree, instead of going for a masters? I would love to get into yacht design instead of commercial/navy/offshore structures stuff.
     
  6. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Trevor, I'm 1/2 way thru the final exam in the Westlawn course. I haven't attempted to use my qualifications to get a job, so I can't really answer the 1st part of your question, other than to say that there are regular postings on the student forum regarding the success of students in getting various design jobs...
    As far as the rest of your queries go, I'd have to agree - there is no substitue for one-on-one, hands-on tuition. Unfortanately that's not possible for many, so distance ed is the only option.
    Westlawn doesn't attempt to teach how to design vessels of the type that you describe - it is concerned mainly with the design of craft up to about 120'.
    Unfortunately, as others around here will tell you, the bulk of jobs appear to be in the military / commercial sectors requiring boats much bigger than this...
    Guess it really depends on what you want to spend your days doing.

    Lastly, the mathematics envolved in the course is, I would think, far more basic than you will come across in your degree
     
  7. CaptScot
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    CaptScot Junior Member

    Hello Trevor,

    I have a college degree, but I believe this is not a prerequisite for Westlawn. Also, don't worry about physics or calculus. All calculations in yacht design are simple math for any physics like issues that will come up. Finally, don't take Westlawn's correspondence course aspect as a negative. While there is a school with classrooms the correspondence option provides an opportunity for a student body that is really world-wide. In addition, many become interested in yacht design after they are already raising a family and working a full-time job like myself. In hindsight I wished I had realized my calling while in college. Though I'm not a Westlawn student yet, there website answered most of my question. www.westlawn.org

    Good luck, Scott Johnkins
     
  8. twakeley
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    twakeley NAME Student

    Okay, thanks for the quick response. I wouldn't mind going into commercial design after college to earn some $$ and get on my feet financially. I think that I might enroll in an online drafting based course that I could work on in my free time or during summers and finish up after I get out of the university.
     
  9. CDBarry
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    CDBarry Senior Member

    Do a summer internship at a design office or shipyard every summer. There are also opportunities for the summer at the federal government.

    Go to local SNAME meetings.
     
  10. westlawn5554X
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    westlawn5554X STUDENT

    I think both school ok as long as you have the cash for one of it, for now westlawn, I would try McNaughton later to get the different method of learning and to keep track of things in design.

    Student
     
  11. Figgy
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    Figgy Senior Member

  12. westlawn5554X
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    westlawn5554X STUDENT

    He... u make sense when u actually enroll in Landing... good job:)

    Student
     
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  13. nicotgr
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    nicotgr Junior Member

    My two cents...

    Exactly
     
  14. luckettg
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    luckettg Junior Member

    Ummm? I suppose I must be dense, but what is the point, exactly? .edu implies a school, not necessarily any real world expertise, while .com could imply both since it is a commercial type of business. Following this logic thread, then you should ask yourself the question, "Do I want to make money with this education?" and then "Which one knows the most about making money for customers?".

    I am a college grad, an engineer, and nearing the end of my career. In general I have only seen a couple of schools in the US teach students how to make a living in any profession.

    My point is, both the .edu and the .com imply both strengths and weaknesses. Neither tell much about whether you will learn something usefull to you or for a potential customer.

    Just my two cents worth,
    Greg Luckett
    :)
     

  15. Figgy
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    Figgy Senior Member

    My point is that if your going to spend up to ten grand on schooling, why go to a .com. If you want, go to www.fivespeedkitty.com and send me the money, hell, I'll only charge you 5 grand. I'll give you a diploma in yacht design.
    Go to a school thats known for producing quality. I'm not saying a .com isnt it, but I would be skeptical. I personally dont care, I'm going to The Landing School. It doesnt make me better than anyone, I just learn better in a classroom than on my own. I looked into both (Yds & West.) and found Westlawn to be better in MY opinion. I'm not trying to start a war, but like I said, "my two cents". Take it for what its worth.
     
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