Hello......... just bought a 1956 Chris Craft 20' Holiday

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by 1956Holiday, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. 1956Holiday
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    Location: Prospect, KY

    1956Holiday Newbie

    Hello everyone,

    I am about as new as a newbie can be regarding wooden boats. :confused:

    I did however just buy a 1956 Chris Craft 20' Holiday.
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=160516860972

    Initially, I'd like to get some help on:

    - Painting the bottom. The how, what and when. Hull was replaced traditionally 9 years ago.

    - Coating/replacing the gas tank.

    Appreciate any help.
     
  2. jehardiman
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    Location: Port Orchard, Washington, USA

    jehardiman Senior Member

  3. Carteret
    Joined: Jan 2004
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    Location: Eastern NC

    Carteret Senior Member

    Hey nice boat. I would like to recommend two things. Buy some boat yard type jack stands. When you go to work on her you will be glad you have them. Secondly keep her out of the sun when you store her.
     
  4. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    ...its the end of the world as we know it.....all the best mate.
     
  5. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    alan white Senior Member

    What part of the hull was replaced? To have replaced the actual entire hull would be outrageously expensive. The most important thing is that the bottom is okay. It's a double bottom with canvas in between, usually a bit rotted----- modern techniques deal with this by replacing the inner planking with 1/4" plywood and replacing the canvas with fiberglass/epoxy and then caulking/bedding the fore/aft outer planking in a sealant (usu. 3m 5200).
    You can find plenty of info in books and websites.
    If you want some help here, take a lot of pictures and post them.
     
  6. 1956Holiday
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    Location: Prospect, KY

    1956Holiday Newbie

    More info/pics

    Thanks for the replies.

    I bought the boat from a reputable dealer/broker http://www.carolinaclassicboatsandcars.com/ and I believe he was fair on the boat's condition. I have been corresponding with a restoration company http://www.woodiesrestorations.com/ and will be making that trip to him soon for the survey and an estimate for different things I am not comfortable with (i.e. two planks need to be replace on the forward port side). Both gentlemen that run these businesses are real great guys. I could not believe how much time they spent with me. Class acts. I don't want to wear out my welcome and thought to meet with the larger wood boat community...........

    My hope is to dock it during the summer season so it stays swelled and store it inside for this winter. For the next few months, I wanted to do what I could to get it ready for the summer.

    Specific to the hull: How often should you paint the hull?? I have some pictures links from the original ad (do not know how to just have them appear in the post). I will get some closer ones tonight. You can see the paint peeling on the transom. The owner before me took real good care of the boat. I got a binder full of receipts, pics, etc. In 2001, there was a $11K invoice for getting the "hull restored", paint, varnish, windshield replacement, etc. $8,500 was for the hull work. The engine was rebuilt the previous year.

    http://i1232.photobucket.com/albums/ff372/1956holiday/B6oh6GBmkKGrHqJiwEydLrsRIBMyEF46k0_3.jpg

    http://i1232.photobucket.com/albums/ff372/1956holiday/B6ohwgmkKGrHqJi4EydCspbnBMyEFfvbcw_3.jpg

    http://i1232.photobucket.com/albums/ff372/1956holiday/B6ohmJEWkKGrHqFjMEybct6D21BMyEE74Okg_3-1.jpg

    As far as the gas tank, the dealer told me that it is the original tank and there is bound to be rust in it. He suggested cleaning/sealing the tank during the off season.
     
  7. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    alan white Senior Member

    Looks like the finish will need to be wooded. As far as the planking repairs go, it shouldn't be too major a job. What about the deck? What is its condition?
    Painting of the bottom will have to be done more often depending on the time spent on the water, latitude, and length of season among other factors.
     
  8. 1956Holiday
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    1956Holiday Newbie

    Thanks for the response. Forgive me, but I do not know what .."finish needs to be wooded" means. Real newbie you are dealing with :)

    Some additional pics. I have not pulled back the carpet, but it feels real solid.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    Looks fairly good, though it really needs an expert's close examination in person.
    Wooding means stripping to bare wood. It's gone a bit too far without proper maintainance, meaning somebody will have to replace 10 coats of varnish (about three gallons) to bring her back. I'd consider refastening the hull while you're at it.
     
  10. 1956Holiday
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    1956Holiday Newbie

    Thanks Allen.

    Wow. I will have someone take a look. Did not think it needed so much work - refastening the hull and the finish. I guess that answers the painting question. I assume I should get that done before painting.

    Do you know (approximately) what that costs if I do not do it myself?

    Appreciate it.
     
  11. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    You will probably have to refasten it but only removing bungs and checking tightness of screws will tell. If she hasn't been refastened, it should be done before you re-varnish. One clue that refastening is needed is seeing if the edges of topside (side) planks are flush. If plank edges are offset, it's a pretty good sign that screws need to be refastened.
    I would guess that wooding will take a 40 hour week and bung removal/replacement with refastening another week. I'm guessing there're over 3500 bungs to deal with including the deck and from the waterline up. Then a good 10 coats of varnish with sanding in between (maybe 30 hours) and you could pay a shop as much as $4000.00-$5000.
    Bear in mind, that boat in excellent condition is worth 25-40k. That would mean all original hardware intact, a good bottom, and a good engine. And you can do most of the work yourself if you are handy.
    It appears you've got a good boat there and it's worth putting the time and money into it, though a surveyor is needed as said to look her over inside and out and judge her condition accurately.
    Painting the bottom is the least of your concerns, as the bottom itself is always suspect of having issues.
    You've got what appears to be a nice runabout, but get that surveyor before you commit to anything.
     
  12. 1956Holiday
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    1956Holiday Newbie

    Thanks Alan. The topside planks (side) look pretty good. The deck however has quite a few spots where the bungs are popping out - or out. Also the chalk is cracked in a bunch of places. I will take some tighter pics and post them.

    Buying the boat ate up a bunch of my resources. I was hoping to get her in the water this summer. As suggested, I will have a restorer/surveyor take a look and see if I can do some minimal work this season (and have some fun with the family) and start in earnest after the summer.
     
  13. El Sea
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: St Petersburg, Florida

    El Sea Junior Member

    "As far as the gas tank, the dealer told me that it is the original tank and there is bound to be rust in it. He suggested cleaning/sealing the tank during the off season."

    I would have the tank cleaned, but, coating? I would recommend waiting on the coating, because, EPA is currently in the process of elevating the Ethanol in gasoline to 15%. Most tank coatings are tested and applicable for no more that 10% at this time.

    El Sea/ L.C.

    "Suckin Sludge & Havin a Gas"
     

  14. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    With bungs popping out, you have to imagine that there are more bungs that look okay but are in the process of loosening. Bungs usually seat against the screw heads, so when the boat goes through wet/dry (Summer/Winter) cycles, the planks shrink in thickness while the screw heads stand as tall as ever, and the pressure against the underside of the bungs causes them to pop out. You'll see where water has entered the wood---- whitish areas where the bungs are. You have no choice but to refasten and varnish, otherwise you are inviting some serious water ingress, the kind that can cause some permanent distortion of the planks. Especially on the deck, where a missing bung is like a little reservoir that captures water and feeds it into the area around the bung. The inequality of moisture content around areas like that causes some ugly (warping and discoloration) things to happen, and I don't think you want to see your baby deteriorate like that.
    I think you've got a special boat there but you'll have to be patient and probably also skilled in the various methods involved in the work discussed.
    There are great books available these days that can walk you through those processes. Start with stripping, sanding, de-bunging, refastening, re-bunging, and varnishing the transom. Find out how to long-board while you're at it. The transom is pretty thick compared to the planking in general. Most of the hull planking is only 7/16" thick, but I believe the transom is substantially thicker, allowing for some minor amateur screw-ups.
    Take your time and you could do all the work yourself. most of the cost will be labor, though you will spend at least $300.00 on varnish and another couple hundred on other supplies and specialized tools like sanders and bits.
    Be in touch here for any advice you need as you go.
     
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