Hello All!! Thinking about building my first sailboat.

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by icemanwillis, Nov 29, 2011.

  1. icemanwillis
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    icemanwillis Junior Member

    Hello everyone. I am thinking about building my first sailboat. I've been doing a lot of research and found a little info. I am a first time boat builder I have a little wood working skills and a good amount of tools I am wanting to build something between 25' to 40' unsure of design so far looking at something monohull. I would like to carry at least 5 people and be able to sleep 4 for over night travel. Could you guys give me some ideas on something not to hard for a first time builder is stitch and glue my best beet or a fiberglass hull? I am thinking about getting my plans from boat designs.com glen l.. what is in the boat plans is it step by step and it offers study plans is this usefull what would it conist of? thanks for any advice and help I hope to make some new friends along the way also in doing research do any of you know any step by step sites to help with diffrent boat building ideas and how to's?? Thanks Steven!!
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    A 25' will carry 5 people and sleep 4 overnight. The 40' will cost you about 10 times more to build. It will also cost you several times more in docking fees and maintenance. Glen L is OK. I don't like the designs, but it is a personal opinion. As far as I know they are not bad. However, if you want something cheap, easy and practical, a sharpie could be an option.

    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=...gU#v=onepage&q=chapelle sharpie plans&f=false
     
  3. sail102
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    sail102 REBEL!!!!!!!

    for a first time boatbuider I would reccomend starting small...you should download plans fore a puddle duck racer and build something small like that before attempting something huge like that.;)
     
  4. icemanwillis
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    icemanwillis Junior Member

    thanks for the reply glen l isnt the design I want at all. cost really isnt much of a factor I just want a good size boat to sail the deep blue:p and I would prefer to stay on it for days. I know i should start small and I might but a big boat is what im after my father in law is a carpenter has been for 20 yrs so if need he would help. im trying to figure out what kind of hull would be best. steel, fiberglass or wood and if wood stitch and glue or planking im not sure. I would like to put it on a trailer if possible. boy since the web is so big I still cant find much pic's and how to's it sucks being a noob:D
     
  5. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    You cannot go wrong with Glen-L full size plans and their forum will give you all the help you need. Built my 1st Glen-L in 1958-9 in High School--the Flying Saucer. Building one now, the Bearcat. I just talked a few days ago to Glen L. Witt N.A. about a detail on the Bearcat plan. He is still working and I'm 70! When I told him about my first boat in 1958-9 he said
    "your still a youngster."
     
  6. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    How about a glass ,hull ,deck ,keel with all internal framing !!

    :idea:In new zealand this used to be a really popular way to get a nice boat quickly and could sit outside and just have a small tent covering the cockpit and main hatch area !!The fully finished boat also had a very good resale value at a later stage ,we even had customers that would make and sail on a first boat and be building a second ! then sell the one in the water when the second was almost finished and then order another hull deck and the main internals .One guy built 5 boat over as many years all with subtle differances inside , so by the end had a free boat paid for from the profits of the others !!
    Interested ??:confused:
     
  7. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    Welcome Iceman

    Welcome Iceman,
    That's quite a range in sizes your considering, You certainly have a lot to
    choose from and your limits I guess have yet to be decided.
    wow! lots to do. Deciding on a boat is certainly no easy task. :D
    and "time" is a factor regardless of age *L*

    anyway... just thought I say hi. "your in good company here." :cool:
    I've received excellent help and advise here. It'll be great to see what you decide. :)
    best of luck,

    DE
     
  8. icemanwillis
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    icemanwillis Junior Member

    thanks dirteater.... I have plenty of time ( I hope :) ) I am not in any hurry to have it together anytime soon.. I just want the right boat im thinking about the glen l 25 but so many choices I just want the right boat. I do know im not going to go bigger then 30' for sure. Im just curiouse what the plans entail and have in them. And what the study plan is for or has in it.
     
  9. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    I would like to carry at least 5 people and be able to sleep 4 for over night travel. [/QUOTE]
    What happens to the 5th guy? :D

    I don't know about bigger boats. but the plans I worked with had 4 x 8 marine plywood layouts ie: details on which pieces are cut out of 1 sheet (material effieceny) / list of materials (check list) / 3 dimensional views (computer and paper) numerical order / drawing and measurements of course / Graphics etc,. that said.. I simply build a small dory. but I'm sure other members here can give you a better idea of how the larger boats come. I would think it would be similar though. :)
     
  10. icemanwillis
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    icemanwillis Junior Member

    I threw the 5th man to the sharks :D
     
  11. sail102
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: carbondale IL

    sail102 REBEL!!!!!!!

    Hope he tasted good:)

    You really should start small just so you have some experience in boatbuilding when you make the biggie:cool:
     
  12. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member


    Study plans are just that should have all the critical measuments of most everything plus a interior layout design of where everything is and how big plus a mast and rigging plan with sail options . No possible to build a boat from unless you are really clever and have a good keen eye for detail . youd get pretty close but not exactly the same , a power boat maybe but not a yacht .
     
  13. icemanwillis
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    icemanwillis Junior Member

    thanks for the advice...
     
  14. icemanwillis
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    icemanwillis Junior Member

    I am still doing some research on whats best.
     

  15. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Iceman, the first thing you need to do is honestly access your skill set. Your wood working skills aside, how much sailing experience do you have? How are you with long term projects, especially those that don't have instant gratification? With these assessments in hand, ask you wife if she agrees. Ask her if she thinks your a nut job.

    Armed with a new found knowledge of your REAL skill set, what areas need improvement? I mention this because your questions and requests aren't unusual and are heard often here and with designers. I'll venture to guess you have limited sailing experience and think you need more boat then you actually do. This is also common and not unusual for novice builders with limited blue water experience. I'm not trying to put you down, just pointing out these are common desires for novices.

    About plans. Glen-L has a large array of types, styles and offerings, though most are dated and few, particularly in the sizes you're interested, are taped seam (stitch and glue is a technique, taped seam is the build method). The styling of these design can be updated to a degree, but changing or updating build methods will take some level of experience, which you obviously don't have.

    The build method is dependent on many variables and only you can truly access them. Taped seam building can be neat, easy and fast, but it's also high in goo factor, itchy fabrics and toxic chemicals. Building in 'glass also has this disadvantage, but even with this in hand, most can find a set of working procedures that avoid most of the discomforts associated in them. If you're like most, you'll learn this the hard way and eventually develop good ways to work around the draw backs and uncomfortable aspects.

    Traditional build methods have none of these issues (though they can if you want). You can build a boat with no epoxy, no 'glass work and just screws, nails and plain old house paint. Typically you have more pieces to make and install, but some find this a rewarding way to go, especially if sensitive to solvents, goo's and other more modern materials or techniques.

    The hardest part about selecting a design is fitting your needs and desires with your skill levels, in both build and sailing preference. Take your time, as you can build a boat that you'll hate to sail, just as easily as one you'll love.

    Lastly, as has been previously mentioned, you should build a small boat first, maybe a dinghy for your mother ship. Preferably using the same build method. This way you'll get your feet wet and can decide if this is the thing for you, before taking a second mortgage out on your house, to pay for materials on a 40' yacht.

    My advise is to go sailing. Get on as many different types and sizes of boats as you can. Beg, borrow and steal rides with friends, crew down at the local yacht club, whatever it takes to get some "sea time". As your sailing skills grow, so will your desires and opinions about what is what and where it should live aboard your dream boat.
     
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