Hedley Nicol Trimaran Plans

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Mar 12, 2010.

  1. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 3,009
    Likes: 125, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 509
    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    I always thought the rigging on Drumbeat was a tangled mess - and told Keith that too. Going from a broad reach to a closer reach carrying the spinnaker, Jim and I had to struggle with the pole, carrying it out, pushing against the spinnaker clew, fight it round that cursed forward shrouds if the wind was up, then back onto the pole ring at the mast base. Kite could easily sky half way through the manoeuvre. There were two other rings each side of the cabin for broader reaching, as in second photograph. Same thing going from shy reach to broader - but that wasn't so much work. Can't remember the exact staying layout - mainly because I disliked it and tried not to look at it. There was also a stupid after cabin that was just dumb weight but Keith liked it because sitting on the throne he could look aft at the view. The guy who bought Drumbeat was/is? Mike Weyman - used to be Commodore of the multihull club.
     
  2. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 2,097
    Likes: 40, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 436
    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Does anyone know where "Renegade" went. ??
    She used to race in the Saturday multihull races on Pittwater. :?:
     
  3. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 2,123
    Likes: 55, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Ah Gary that stern view is great. The bunks are under the cockpit at least to keep off watch weight forward. With those lowers inboard bigger genoas can be flown but as the wind picks up the ama digs in more, bows could be a bit down and it might be harder to plane :) I've never seen forward lowers before I hope they rerigged.
    I noticed Renegade seems to be sold now or off the market, no idea where. I do have some pictures from the listings and some sent by gypsy 28.
     
  4. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 3,009
    Likes: 125, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 509
    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Sorry, memory fade, the spinnaker pole problem was when we gybed, shifting it across the the other spinnaker ring set on the cabin top on the other side: you had to thread it through all that dopey forward rigging - there was no ring at mast base, I had that wrong.
     
  5. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 3,009
    Likes: 125, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 509
    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    We never really buried Drumbeat's bows (the boat was kept very light by Keith) - although we came very close once screaming along on a hard reach over the no go area of shallows and reefs near Tiritiri Island, close to Shearer Rock, where the waves were picking up like Piha surf and the boat was accelerating rapidly on the rolling wave fronts. The area used to be a munitions dumping ground and I had visions of us not only touching bottom in front of a wave and cartwheeling, the crew scattered through the rigging like frightened chickens - but also being simultaneously being blown skywards from not quite defunct explosives. Drumbeat did bury her whole front but the large area of hard wing decks forward got lifted by the enormous quantities of bow wave spray, she covered herself in white, shook a bit and kept on going. Keith and the aft end crew all had their heads down sorting out some sheet problem in the cockpit and seemed totally oblivious of the near death situation. "No worries mate," said Keith afterwards; he had great faith in the boat.
     
  6. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 2,123
    Likes: 55, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    I don't think his faith was misplaced. When I first started sorting out our boat I thought it an interesting old relic and I was quite wrong about some things. It took me awhile to appreciate how the different design elements worked together. Those skinny ama bows get their lift from the stem shape while the forward end of the wing deck supports them and acts as a lifting sled if you do manage to run into a big wave. The air compressor effect of the wing softens the ride and makes for a fairly dry boat. The cambered deck sheds any water that comes onboard quickly as well as providing more level footing to windward when heeled. I like the level wing bottom because you don't need additional structure for counters and bunks which saves weight. When heeled it also shows a angled surface to the waves which softens any impact. Friends with other wing deck tris think we pound less and are drier. Obviously there are lots of ways to make faster boats now but like the CSK catamarans it is from the era when a yacht was expected to have a certain amount of bunks and accommodations for the crew. That approach makes for a nice fast cruising multihull now. The big deck is great for sail handling and taking people for rides without the firehose effect that multis with nets get in the rough stuff. We take long trips adventure sailing and appreciate the comfort level and the fact that the canoe will stay on deck and there is room for the bikes. When it breezes up we have to watch out for the power boat displacement cruisers who do not expect us to go so fast. I've had to wave people off who thought they had time to cross the bows or tack despite us having the right of way. How does the song go?
    Here lies the body of Michael O'Day
    Who died defending his right of way.
    He was right, dead right when he yelled "Starboard tack!"
    But the other boat got caught aback.....
     
  7. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 2,123
    Likes: 55, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    I was recently contacted by Lex Nicol (Hedley's nephew) about Vagabond MK2 plans, he doesn't have any of the Hedley Nicol plans but he offered to do any design work and answer any questions on construction etc....I'll be referring the Nicol owners with design questions who contact me to Lex, He forwarded my email to Allan Nicol, Hedley's son (Ian's dad) who went through the attic and turned up plan transparencies (some incomplete) for several of the designs including Clipper, Wanderer, Vagabond MK2 and Voyager and emailed me back. The elusive Vagabond MK2 patterns aren't there :( I've encouraged them both to write up a history of Hedley's design and building operation for outrig.org and send some historical material there and to the Mariner's Museum. Allan is going through the design material and checking into the feasibility of making plans available to owners/restorers etc...Both Allan and Lex have shared stories and insights on these designs and Hedley's well thought out operation, sadly much was lost after Hedley's disappearance when the yard was tied up for years in legal woes. Apparently printed plan sets disappeared to America with the yard caretaker who changed his name (starts with a R) and started a monohull design office patterned after working with the Nicols. These were marketed in the late 60's and early 70's while supplies lasted.
    These boats are important parts of multihull history, it is good to know the work wasn't all lost and may be available again to those interested. Our Vagabond MK2 is a great fast cruiser . For a shallow water trimaran race/cruiser the 25' clipper has a lot to recommend it (probably drier than the bucc 24 :) ) I'd like to put one one my to do list as a stable mate to our Vagabond. Thanks to Ian for getting the family talking and to Allan and Lex for following through, I'll update as word comes in.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. gypsy28
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 218
    Likes: 25, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 120
    Location: NSW Australia

    gypsy28 Senior Member

    Its great to see these designs may not die after all
     
  9. Waterat
    Joined: Jan 2010
    Posts: 33
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: N/A

    Waterat Junior Member

    Hi. I sailed a 25' Clipper for 15 Years. We would have put 5,000 NM under the keel.
    She was a stable, dry, comfortable boat, with a good turn of speed. We often
    clocked 30 NM on a single tide. The best speed ever was 13 Knots which made
    our hair stand on end; but 10 Knots was a regular occurance.
    We never had any reason to doubt the cross beams in 15 Years, Regards, Johnny.
     
  10. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 2,123
    Likes: 55, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Hi Johnny, I agree the cross beams are up for anything. Some of the lighter built racing boats had outboard ama frames crack in heavy offshore conditions (very thin ply ring frames) and needed to be strengthened. I like the Clipper, it seems a very practical boat for a lot of areas. We have got our Vagabond mk2 up to about 17 knots under spinnaker when light despite the awful keel it currently has. People who have these boats really like them though they aren't well known now. The Clipper offers a neat alternative in the small tri market, dry is great in cold water areas like the NW and shallow draft is always handy.
    Cheers, Chris
     
  11. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 2,123
    Likes: 55, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Here are some sail plans showing the subtle differences between the Cavalier and Vagabond MK2. The sheer on the Cavalier is 10" higher allowing a lower cabin. The Buccaneer 40 is very similar with the extra length for a inboard installation. The Buccaneer 40 cabin is on one level as is our modified Vagabond MK2. I'll try to digitize the other boats sail plans. The different rig options could be used on any of the boats.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 3,009
    Likes: 125, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 509
    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Cav, Good to see those old Nicol silhouettes, brings back memories ... but Drumbeat didn't have a fixed keel, nor the long fixed boards under her floats. but a decent sized centreboard instead (that is until Mike Weyman bought the boat and changed it to original plan. You reading this, Mike?)
    I remember one round Waiheke race where we found ourselves in the middle of the keelboats, the easterly breeze had freshened and we were all beating to the bottom corner ... and Drumbeat was sailing fast, overtaking boats but she was making plenty of leeway .. and we got strongly abused by the monohulls for going sideways and fouling their course. And this was true but Keith wouldn't hear of it and snarled some comments in reply. Once round the corner it was a close reach so away we went.
    Be interested to hear how the fixed long boards work; have you got this setup?
     
  13. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 2,123
    Likes: 55, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    My boat was built with them but they were removed and the main fin and rudder were deepened and a foil section (of doubtful origin) was added to make it a vortex generator. In lighter conditions we make more leeway, as the ama immerses and speed builds we make much less. and yes you can see the vortex streams. We often sail past boats to windward not pointing with them but by covering the extra distance faster. We plan on removing the foil fairing and returning to stock depth but installing a daggerboard for leeway prevention. The skeg can handle beaching and shallow water chores. I've heard from other owners that the ama fins need to be the deeper Vagabond 2 ones, the shallow fins of Wanderer don't do much except protect the bottom.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2011
  14. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 2,123
    Likes: 55, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    I should add that the drawing of Privateer, Hedley Nicol's Vagabond MK2, shows the main bow about a foot longer than what is on the plans. Mine is built this way too. Alan Nicol, Hedley's son, said it was to match the bow closer to the amas but I have a suspicion it was spring back from the stem lamination in both cases. After all who wants to lay up those things twice? ;) This makes the Cavalier amas look longer in proportion comparing the two drawings but they are really about the same on the plans. The wingdeck doesn't extend as far forward on the Cav. which also makes the amas look longer. The Cavalier sits deeper in the water but uses shallower fins so they draw similar amounts. The rigs are the same.
     

  15. Kutoroka
    Joined: Apr 2011
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 1, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Australia

    Kutoroka Junior Member

Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.