Hawia 5-0

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Dirteater, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    I do ask for some forgivness for asking this question :)

    On the old Hawia 5-0 (you know the one with Mcgarrett and "Danno".)
    the opening showed Canoe's with "pontoons" extended to one side of
    the boat held in place by 2 extensions.

    Is there a proper name for this style of boat?
    and is there a proper name for the "pontoon"
     

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  2. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    The boat type is a proa, the pontoon is an "ama" or outside hull. I don't really use all the "proper" names just the ones that seem appropriate in my experience.
    Why, just out of curiosity?
     
  3. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    Once again Doug my thanks :D

    yes, curiousity for the most part.
    I think it's an interesting application on a boat.
    I want to learn more about the purpose of the "ama".
    I honestly don't know what there exact purpose/application is for.
    I do believe this design is used in several countries.
    I like thier design.

    by the way, I was reviewing your gallery today.
    very interesting designs there as well.
    It makes me want to build model prototypes out of balsa and
    such. great gallery.
     
  4. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    and obviously there a style of boat I remember from my childhood on tv. :D
     
  5. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    ===============
    Thanks! Google "proa"-there is tons of info out there. Basically, any ama is there for stability but there's all kinds of theories on how big it should be ,how far from the main hull etc,etc..
     
  6. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    more hours of enjoyable reading!
    yapee!
     
  7. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

  8. ProaSailor
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    ProaSailor New Member

    It is an outrigger canoe, not a proa (sorry Doug); as explained in the wikipedia link on proas:
    Some have said that proa just means boat and mistakenly applied the term to one-way craft of all sorts, even "power proas" with no sails, ignoring the fact that in Micronesia, where proas originated, all "boats" were sailing proas! And they shunt to always keep the same hull to windward.

    Gary Dierking has probably developed the modern outrigger canoe more than anyone:

    [​IMG]

    The float is called an "ama", the main hull is the "vaka" and the crossbeams are called "akas" or "‘Iako" (Hawaiian).
     
  9. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    ========================
    Thanks for the enlightenment- but I think this stuff sometimes goes to far-but I appreciate learning the correct identification.

    from wikipedia:
    " Traditional proas superficially resemble outrigger canoes, but have a buoyant lee hull and a denser, ballasted hull to windward for stability."

    more on outrigger canoes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outrigger_canoe
     
  10. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    I chose the multi-hull thread as I thought this style of boat (now understood as an "outrigger canoe") would fall under this heading and I believe it does. If it doesn't please do not hesitate to correct me.

    I am enjoying learning about boats at this stage in my life.
    I've received nothing but expert advise on this forum. And I'm sure many times when a junior member poses a question you wonder where they are really going with this. ie: Doug Lord's question to me. So..., in do respect...

    Multi-hull:?:
    I get to thinking that almost every boat can benefit from this application.
    ok, not speed boats, day cruisers etc. I'm wondering why there aren't more of them? or why is this not an "optioinal" application. Originally... I was thinking the "ama" was for stability when weight was added, ie: A big Shark. :D,. and then there the stability application of the "ama".

    ProaSailor opened the other door.
    "ignoring the fact that in Micronesia, where proas originated, all "boats" were sailing proas!"
    Also I can see a sailor standing up in his outrigger canoe, with a paddle out the back, as if he is going through the canals of Venice.

    I guess the bottom line is... " It's the application of Multi-hulls on boats?" that has caught my attention. An enormous question I know *L*
    Still, it is one that fascinates my mind, (kind of a bee in my bonet). The last time this happened I built something *LOL*
    I thank you.

    DE

    p.s. I only wish I had started 25 years ago :D
     
  11. ProaSailor
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    ProaSailor New Member

    Heh, heh... Multihulls are found in many applications including top fuel dragsters, military ships, huge car ferries, racing and cruising sail boats:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    One place to start is http://www.outrig.org

    Here is a really great Sports Illustrated article from 1960 that discusses a lot of Woody Brown's history building catamarans with Rudy Choy and stalking the 1955 Transpac fleet.

    The Cats Squelch The Catcalls
    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1071382/

    video: "woody brown and his catamarans from the pbs hawaii special wind and waves"
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7JEOwbyWr7Y

    Oh, and it was BMW Oracle's trimaran that won the America's Cup last year, bringing the next contest to San Francisco in 2013:

    [​IMG]

    You have a bit of catching up to do! Cheers
     
  12. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    ^%&##!!#!! woody brown! (for one (1)) amazing!
    moving on to (2)...

    thanks proa.
     
  13. peterchech
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    peterchech Senior Member

    Multihulls are lots of fun, especially on the smaller end. I built one of Gary Dierking's outrigger canoes, and it has been the most fun I've had on the water. Not as fast as a beachcat, but much more fun once you get it going IMHO. And hey, it will outsail my Hunter 25 monohull any day, despite costing me only about $1200 to build.

    This winter I plan on doing some mods to try this shunting thing that so many proafiles insist upon. Can't wait.

    just for kicks dirteater, youtube "Pjoa", and youtube "prao petrel". These are a couple beach sized proas that use traditional rigs. You might want to youtube "proa madness" too, a modern approach to the cruising pacific proa.
     
  14. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Gentlemen,

    Lets not get stuck on the perfection of Wikipedia.

    What would you call the "Atlantic" proa, Cheers, designed by Dick Newick. It shunts, but the hulls are equal length, the small one is not heavy (instead it is bouyant), and it really kicked *** in the 1968 OSTAR.

    Is there anyone besides Wikipedia suggesting it wasn't really a Proa?
    http://www.wingo.com/newick/

    Marc
     

  15. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    I'm leaning to wiki,
    to me its probably the length of the ama,
    it almost seems like two hulls rather than a smaller outrigger.
    tuff call really. (at least for me anyway :) )
     
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