Hartly 16ft

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Danauz, Sep 18, 2016.

  1. Danauz
    Joined: Sep 2016
    Posts: 1
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Australia

    Danauz New Member

    Hi folks first time on this site looks great I have a good amount of experience with tinnies but just recently bought a 1971 Hartly to fix up for 300 was going to buy a set up and ready to go but loved the idea of getting me a cheap wooden and fixing it up with my brothers my dads looked at it and said he wouldn't bother we were dead keen on fixing it up until he gave us a downer wondering what people's options are its seems in good knock for age no rot in hull just dirty anyone have similar exsperiances
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,166
    Likes: 123, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    There is a thread here about a bloke in Tasmania doing up an old Hartley.

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/wo...ation/hartley-flareline-16-project-47612.html
     
  3. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 2,938
    Likes: 137, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1593
    Location: Arlington, WA-USA

    Petros Senior Member

    Welcome to the forum

    not sure what you want to know, if the boat is worth fixing up or not?

    Need to know a lot more information, but if the hull is sound, no rot or damage, and you do not count your labor (or labour?), than usually most of the cost of cleaning, sanding and repainting a hull is the labor. Post more pictures, inside and out, so we can see more of what it might need.

    Material costs are fairly low, particularly if you just buy good quality household paints and finishes (exterior grade).

    When adults with lots of responsibilities and full time employment look at a project they either have to find the work enjoyable, or do not want to spend their spare time doing repairs and maintenance. They just as soon buy something ready to go without requiring any repairs or work to get it ship shape.

    If you and your mates are young, short of enough money to buy a shinny new boat, and have the time to work on it, than fix it up your self will be an adventure in itself. You will learn a lot and will likely have a lot more fun using a boat you restored rather than just bought ready to go.

    I say go for it. have fun, and remember to hunt for good prices for the stuff you will need. There are many on this forum that can help you with specific questions and guide you in bring that hardly back to life.

    Post more pictures!
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,166
    Likes: 123, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I hope Danauz's boat didn't sink under him, he has not returned here !
     
  5. shipwright
    Joined: Oct 2016
    Posts: 34
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Australia

    shipwright Junior Member

    Hartley

    DANUAZ: I have a Hartley about your vintage. when I looked at her I thought well I will buy because of almost new diesel and shafting. However I got into the shed and said I can repair this.(would have been quicker to build a new one) however finished taking about 4' of her bows, areas of rot in the house and deck, just finished another refit. Problem is the plywood material, this boat was very well built with materials and practice of the day.
    The ply is marine grade was well primed, what is happening is inner cores have reached end of the cellular structure in the veneers is collapsing .
    Anyway we have had many years fun out of her.
    Shipwright:cool:
     
  6. tom kane
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 1,761
    Likes: 41, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 389
    Location: Hamilton.New Zealand.

    tom kane Senior Member

    I love ply wood boats there is nothing as user friendly and pleasant to work with than wood
    and nothing to beat the environment sleeping, living aboard a ply wood boat and ease of maintenance ( If you have the know how) if they can be kept under cover and dry when not in use.

    I was attracted to Hartley design because of the design of the bilges which allowed easy draining and cleaning.

    But ply wood does have a shorter life span than (plastic, ally, steel.)
    You can build a ply wood boat quickly and easily,very likely the cheapest way to build a boat.
     
  7. shipwright
    Joined: Oct 2016
    Posts: 34
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Australia

    shipwright Junior Member

    Hartley

    Tom Kane: I have been building timber boats all my life, remember there is nothing in a timber boat that can not be replaced or repaired.
    A timber vessel has a soul, unlike other mediums.
    Shipwright:cool:
     
  8. tom kane
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 1,761
    Likes: 41, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 389
    Location: Hamilton.New Zealand.

    tom kane Senior Member

    Dead right shipwright, but would you call plywood "timber".
    I would rather repair and maintain a timber boat myself such as lapstrake or planking, but ply makes a lighter boat for sheltered waters.
    I love user friendly in all things. Wood is a pleasure boat.
     
  9. shipwright
    Joined: Oct 2016
    Posts: 34
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Australia

    shipwright Junior Member

    ply

    Tom Kane: I really think you have to consider ply as timber, it comes from a tree ,use employs timber skills, there are many designs that are designed to use ply, timber planking could be used but at greater expense in labour and material. In such designs the ply skin is supported by timber scantlings.
    Buying a timber vessel to rebuild or modify will require the skills of a good boat builder as you may have to take out stem, planks etc.
    Shipwright:cool:
     
  10. shipwright
    Joined: Oct 2016
    Posts: 34
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Australia

    shipwright Junior Member

    Reply-your 6

    Tom Kane: re : life off materials. our boat would be around 60years old,
    years ago I had to pull out a plank for a surveyor. That ship was a commercial ferry 72 years old. I do not think I will find too many aluminum or fibreglass that old.
    Steel ships are given a lifespan of 30 years by insurers
    Shipwright:cool:
     
  11. tom kane
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 1,761
    Likes: 41, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 389
    Location: Hamilton.New Zealand.

    tom kane Senior Member

    As I say shipwright I love wooden boats and have belonged to a Traditional Small craft club for quite awhile and have seen many wonderful wooden boats and some go back to the old scows.
    Many boats home built here were not built to the high standard an experienced boat builder like you would demand and some inferior quality ply was available and I had experience coming across some bad batches of what was called Marine quality.

    There are still a few ply boats built 1950`s 1960`s still around in good condition.
    The problems with ply usually came about because the butt edges of the ply were not protected and water traveled up inner softer core wood.

    The fun days of building your own boat in your back yard have dwindled mainly because neighbors complain about noise.
    Like many other home handyman (persons) I did not have the luxury of sparing no expense building my projects.
    I still have some examples of the ply I had to use on some of my projects which was milled in Canada shipped to the UK turned into David Brown tractor cases and shipped out to New Zealand, and used by me to build boats on the cheap.
    It`s great material and I still get a thrill cutting up and enjoying the woody smell.Great.
     

  12. thatone123
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Wasilla, Alaska

    thatone123 Junior Member

    Thanks

    This post of the boat in the photo gave me more real info on the cabin information I was seeking on the post above it, than any other help I have got on the forum so far. I like the old school 50's look of that cabin and wish I could see more of it from the inside.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. johnnyfire
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    2,454
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.