Hartley Flareline 16 project

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by djaus, Jul 12, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 517
    Likes: 20, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 99
    Location: Australia

    buzzman Senior Member

    Is that a threaded bung, or just a "shove it in and hope it stays there"?
     
  2. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 33
    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    HA HA HA, wouldn't that be a laugh. That'd make a great youtube vid eh'. Yes mate, it is a threaded bung, made from brass. I reshaped it as the bung has a large slot in the centre for which to screw it in but I didn't have an appropriate tool for the job. So I squared it off so I can use a big spanner. The screw that holds the wire to the bung doesn't go all the way in so it allows the wire to spin freely when the bung is screwed in & out. I also have 2 spare plastic fittings which will be carried onboard.
     
  3. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 517
    Likes: 20, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 99
    Location: Australia

    buzzman Senior Member

    LOL, yeah, I figured it must be that, just the thread wasn't visible.

    One of my boats has a galv iron thread in the hull with a hex head 'cap' threaded on it as the 'bung'. Same principle but opposite. Female rather than male threaded.

    How is yours attached to the boat? And how is it able to spin? Close up pic maybe?
     
  4. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 33
    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    New sub frame fitted Screwed & glued everywhere
    I have changed my idea for the new front panel on the outboard well. As the fuel tank sits proud of this panel i'm not going with my first idea. Instead i'm going to place another sheet of the 7 ply under the sub frame to complete the front of the well. Thus leaving the space under it free from unnecessary frame work. I will also fit a couple of strips of wood between the sheer and the inner longitudinal beam to bolster it up & strengthen the sub frame attachment point. I wanted to run the sub frame all the way across & screw it to the sheer but this proved to be impossible as I couldn't get it in, past the other frame in front of it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2016
  5. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 33
    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    So tell me Mr Buzzman, what type of boat do you own. Put some photo's up.
     
  6. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 517
    Likes: 20, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 99
    Location: Australia

    buzzman Senior Member

    Wanna see my projects, huh...??? Ok, you asked for it.... lol

    The wooden runabout upside down under the shed roof is the Hartley - I believe it's a Scamp 15ft. Complete with late sixties Cortina MkII steering wheel. Solid and with no rot other than the delamination on the outside of the transom, which is an addition to the original construction and needs to be removed anyway....

    The turquoise and white fibreglass runabout is an historic rarity - an 11ft Caribbean Sea Nymph dating to (probably) 1963. It's solid apart from the ply floors but lacks a windscreen.....at least it floats!

    The sailing dinghy is an International 420 - an ex-racing boat that is being converted into a cuddy cabin trimaran by the addition of the hulls from a beach cat (which I am yet to purchase....can't find what I want cheap enough, or its gone before I can get to it... grrrr).....

    The cat belongs to my sister and is named Candy or Fluff, for obvious reasons. I originally had the boat at waist level so I could work on it, but realised if I strapped it up to the ceiling I could park the Toyota underneath it and free up some shed space. The wooden dinghy in the foregorund of that shot is inside the workshop being stripped back and refinished. It's a homebuilt 19ft row/motor boat that will (eventually) be the tender for my 33ft Farrier Command 10 trimaran (still only at the plans stage) which is the loooooong term retirement project. Will cost $40K to build, so I'm in no hurry to start on it.... lol

    There's also a Saab 900 Turbo, with less than 180K kms on the clock, that runs, but needs a few electrical gremlins sorted....but you asked about the boats... ;)
     

    Attached Files:

  7. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 33
    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    OMG...your a busy man. I thought I was biting off too much with 1 boat. I'm humbled! I figured the frames I was looking at were Hartley inspired. They stand out a little. The little International looks similar to a 5mt Corsair, I sailed those for a few years whilst in naval cadets. I like the trimaran idea, very original. Do you fix these up for profit or just for the pleasure of restoration?
     
  8. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 33
    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    Today I got some steel for my trailer, thanks to my olds (their contribution to the project), so as soon as Tas' gets some good weather I can put it together. Also got lucky at a local 2nd hand shop I frequent, got a 10lt drum of low sheen exterior "fence/outdoor furniture" paint, light grey in colour. I payed $25 for it! I plan to use this for the Hartley's interior & the trailer.
     
  9. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 517
    Likes: 20, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 99
    Location: Australia

    buzzman Senior Member

    For a profit...??? ROTFLMAO

    Owning a boat is like standing in the shower and tearing up $50 bills. You get wet and it's expensive....

    Nah, just for my own amusement.... :)

    The Hartley is a 'long term' project, as I can't justify expending what is needed to get it trailable and usable atm. I rescued it after the previous owner abandoned it, and the owner of the property on which it was abandoned was going to burn it if no one took it away.

    So I had to haul it further than yours, and therefore it owes me a tank of fuel...and two six packs...and a pub bistro dinner....for the mate who helped me haul its hefty frame onto the trailer.

    I estimate 1-2 grand, plus motor. Fortunately I got the trailer for $450.

    So far it owes me $650.....and is hanging in the shed, unable to be used. An excellent investment, clearly.... ;)

    The Caribbean I purchased for a specific trip two years ago, as I needed something small that floated, but is now surplus to requirements. I'd love to keep it and restore it, but again, it's not what I need for the longer term, and is taking up valuable building space in the shed.

    The 420 was bought with a view to doing some weekend overnighting up and down the coast, and trailing it to other places to do ditto. But after sailing it a couple of times I realised I don't like being wet constantly, and having a crap sense of balance, I nearly fell out of it twice and did actually fall out of it two other times when it was overpowered and capsized.

    Hence the trimaran idea, to gain some stability, protection from spray, and somewhere to keep dry and warm in port - and lockable so I can leave it at a wharf or on a beach somewhere without being paranoid about theft.

    I'd rather build an 18ft Scarab from Ray Kendrick, for which I also have the plans, but it will cost me too much and therefore take too long to get back onto the water.

    So, the plan to convert the 420 + a beach cat into a micro-cruising trimaran, getting me out on the water as cheaply and as comfortably as possible. By adding a genoa and spinnaker to the rig and strengthening the mast with a ply+fibreglass skin, it will be quick enough. I'll use the sails for the 420 in the meantime, and save for the new ones.

    The drawing attached shows the progression of the thinking from open boat, to cuddy cab and thence to trimaran with full cabin. You can't see it in the sketch, but the akas will be designed to fold forward for trailing. My reasoning for this is twofold - I like the idea of horizontal rather than vertical folding (for a bunch of reasons, not least of which is the dockside berthing issue) and if the akas fold back into position, they can be run slightly inboard of the pivot point, and thus subtract some of the load on the pivot bolt.

    I've done some pencil sketches of the interior, and my measurements indicate a 2m X 0.8m berth will fit easily down one side, while there will be plenty of storage in the wings and enough bench space for a portable stove, a sink and a small folding chart table, which will double as the saloon table. Sitting headroom only, of course, but comfortable at around 1.5m in the centre at the companion, and around 1.3m at the outer edge of the cabin roof.

    I hope to have it sailing by this time next year, if not sooner, but the renovations to the house might interfere with that.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 33
    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    It's a rather unusual plan but sounds like you've given it plenty of thought. The road to our goal is often paved with detours & distractions, but hopefully we'll get there.

    So far my project has cost about $750, add $300'ish when I'm ready to get the motor serviceable. The boat was a freebie so that was a good starting point. I knew what needed to be done, I havn't underestimated anything yet. The trailer, even with $200 worth of fresh steel is still cheap & fits my requirements perfectly. By the time I'm done it'll be super strong & be a full roller job with fresh paint. New hitch, springs & tyres will also be on the cards but not for a while.
     
  11. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 517
    Likes: 20, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 99
    Location: Australia

    buzzman Senior Member

    Amazing what a coat of paint can achieve..!!

    Whatever you do, don't tell the inspecting officer that you've rebuilt the chassis when you take it over th pits to get registration, as they *might* then require an engineer's certificate.

    I had to go 'inspector shopping' after the first one I took it to told me he'd only register it with an engineer's certificate....after I foolishly (but proudly) told him the new chassis was even stronger than the original as I'd used 50mm tube rather than 40mm, and used galv steel not mild.

    So it's a "new" trailer then, is it? he asked, before demanding an engineer's certificate.....
     
  12. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 33
    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    I've stated here & on my YouTube vid's that the trailer already had rego" when I bought it. In Tas' therefore it does not require an inspection...AT ALL. I have already transferred ownership & it's got rego' 'til October. All I have to do is pay for more rego" when my renewal arrives! Besides I'm not about to use a sub standard trailer on the road.
     
  13. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 517
    Likes: 20, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 99
    Location: Australia

    buzzman Senior Member

    Dirk, sorry, missed that vital piece of info.....

    It's the same here in NSW - if it has rego it doesn't need to be inspected at all, provided you remember to pay the rego each year.....provided.....

    :)
     
  14. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 33
    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    My new boat seats. Gas strut, adjustable height. I was hoping to find some like these. Would you believe $5 each from my local "tip shop" (resource recovery centre to be politically correct). Will look fab' with some new upholstery.(They're a bit worn)

    I will also be adding a bench seat in front of the outboard well. I'm currently looking in to possible materials. I'd like black vinyl with orange piping. My ma' is a crack shot with a sewing machine so were hacking out some ideas.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2016

  15. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 33
    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    I've been a bit quiet, been working on the trailer. I forgot to take photo's but I welded the new draw bar on today, tomorrow the trailer will be back on 2 wheels then put on the other side. The darn thing will be a heavy sucker when I'm done.

    It's easier using the stick welder if I'm welding down hand, need to load up the weld on the draw bar too.

    Would have been easier replacing the entire frame rails but I guess I didn't want to bite off that much work, plus I would have been messing with the geometry of the trailer. Bad enough having to fit a new draw bar.

    I'm seriously considering building a new boat trailer but that'll be a year or 2 off. Trailer "to do" list is: jockey wheel bracket on, bit more steel, more welding, paint the underside, then back on 2 wheels, more welding, tyre guards on, hitch & chain on, full paint, rollers on (some from off the old trailer too). Then I'll try to remove the rims (not lookin' good though) so might need new hubs & rims. I was planning on new rim's/tyres anyhow plus I need to get a 3rd for a spare.

    Soon as I'm done with the trailer I'll be back into the boat. Fibreglassing the transom/hull joint will be the next job. Then steel brackets for the same, then interior paint will be next, fit the seats & build a rear bench seat. Then deck prep & paint then off the old trailer onto some sleepers/tyres for hull paint. Then onto the new trailer.

    Then off to a marine tech for a water pump in the outboard. At some point I have to get my boat license, then safety gear & finally get the Hartley registered.....THEN I'LL BE GOIN' FISHING!

    Would have been easier just taking a rod down to the wharf eh'!
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. Bigfork
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    2,335
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.