Hartley Flareline 16 project

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by djaus, Jul 12, 2013.

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  1. buzzman
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    buzzman Senior Member

    Dirk
    From whom did you order the DOT/glycol mix?
    Sounds like you're making progress.
     
  2. djaus
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    djaus Salted Nut!

    I'm getting the DOT premix called "Protectimber" from Garrard pty ltd in Victoria. They are listed in the distributors section on the Mabons website. 5lt for $90 + $16 freight. Should be enough to do what I want. I'm only treating the timbers that I have exposed plus new bit's & spots where the paint has peeled & let moisture in. (cockpit & cab & deck). Also I bit the bullet a bit early & bought some cheap exterior ply today. 1 sheet of 5 ply (2400 x 1200mm) @ $39 & 2 sheets of 7 ply (2400 x 1200) @ $59 each. 5 ply for new deck & outboard well, 7 ply for false floor, it can also double up bits of the 7 ply to build in to the transom. Hopefully will have some nice weather on the weekend to get in to it.
     
  3. buzzman
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    buzzman Senior Member

    Sounds good, but - it's a bit late - you should always double check that exterior ply is manufactured using A-Bond glue - the same stuff that is used for marine ply.

    Bunnings can always ring the supplier to check.....they did for me..! :)

    For a low budget project, especially when you'll be treating the timber with DOT, it's probably good enough for the repairs to the upperworks.

    I probably wouldn't recommend exterior grade for the hull, and if using it for the decks I'd be VERY carefull with the treatment and waterproofing. Good soak in DOT; cuppla coats of primer; undercoat and then at least two coats of gloss. Flat the first coat with wet and dry, like 600grit, to take the shine off before recoating.

    And I would definitely epoxy the edges of any exterior grade ply...just to be sure.

    As you've found, it's usually half the price of marine ply, but is not half the quality.

    The princviple difference is in the type of veneer and the 'voids' allowable. Exterior grade may have substantial voids whereas marine ply won't. Voids weaken the sheet.

    And exterior grade is usually pine veneered, and is much heavier than equivalent weight marine ply in okume or gaboon, or even the meranti/luan types.

    Hoop pine is also heavier, but is pretty much the only ply available in Oz that meets the Oz/NZ Standard for Marine Ply - and it's price reflects this. Steep.

    Oh, and another good trick for the final coat is to buff it with automotive polish. If it has brush marks, you could even cut it with cutting compound first, but as this invariably takes the shine off, you do have to be a bit careful not to overdo it.

    But if you do, it's easy enough to recoat and try again...! Once you're happy with the polished paintwork, give it a coat of automotive wax to help the water bead off.
     
  4. djaus
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    djaus Salted Nut!

    My dentist lets me run an account...thank god! 3 fillings, 2 hits of local anesthetic, a very sore jaw & $400 later! As for the ply, It won't be used on the hull, just interior bits & the inner transom. I'm told it has waterproof glue, alas the "exterior" label & it's pine from Chile. By the time I'm finished with it, it WILL be waterproof don't you worry! I'm up to speed with painting techniques too, I've painted model boat's, my previous car & my current one (about 6 months ago), houses inside & out & everything in between. I have a good spray gun, compressor and all the experience I need. Still have some leftover colour & clear coat too (might do some pin striping on the hull to match my car...mmm. Oh' yeh...I just looooove buffing!....NOT!!! Gloss through a spray gun won't require much if indeed no attention after drying. Fingers crossed for nice weather tomorrow.
     
  5. buzzman
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    buzzman Senior Member

    LOL.... yeah, if you gotta spray gun and know how to use it, your 3/4 home.....
     
  6. djaus
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    djaus Salted Nut!

    Well I'm not at that point yet but painting won't be an issue. The hardest parts of this resto' is finding a semi decent trailer & repairing the transom. Had overcast weather all day today so didn't do much, got some old tyre's to prepare for moving the boat to ground level & tested the winch...all good - 1/4 of a can of WD40 will do that eh'!
     
  7. buzzman
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    buzzman Senior Member

    Yeah, finding a good trailer is a bugger. Three words for you....inspect before payment.

    Ask my why I know this is important..... lol

    Also, dunno if it's the same in Tassie, but if no rego needs to go over pits prior to rego, so must then comply with all new and latest rules. So get one with rego.

    For example, must a have the pull up, padlockable tow hitch, not the older knurled knob with lock pin; must have reflectors all over it; must have guards that come *at least* half way down the tyre in front and to the rear; rear number plate light, etc etc.

    Ask me how I know this.... lol

    My "cheap $200 trailer" know owes my over $500 - but that's because the "needs a bit of TLC" turned into *needs a complete new chassis*. So $300 worth of new galvanised steel tube later (and a case of beer for my welder mate) and I have a trailer that should see me out.

    Old chassis looked fine, till you turned it over and saw the tin worm had perforated the entire underside of each tube....."gee, I never saw that" said the vendor. So...ask for photos of the *underside* of the chassis rails....

    Caveat emptor..!!
     
  8. djaus
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    djaus Salted Nut!

    You forgot to mention the high tensile safety chain (the type with a code on every 3rd link). If I get one without rego it will be subject to a standard inspection, doesn't faze me. My budget won't allow for much, just need a decent chassis to work with, at least if you have to do a bit of work to get it the way you want then you know what you've got! I'm almost 36 years old, 'aint my first rodeo. Today's video will be up shortly. Made quite a bit of progress with a good outcome.
     
  9. buzzman
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    buzzman Senior Member

    Working under cover is always a bonus, winter or summer!

    You say the outside of the transom has been fibreglassed...is this definite, or is it just epoxy-coated?

    Eitehr way, it might make sense to belt sand the below waterline section of the transom, at least, and treat that with the DOT as well.

    It would probably only require a coat of epoxy and then alkyd paint, but as you're not going to remove the damaged section of the frame at the bottom edge of the transom, you really can't see what's behind it.

    If you want to take the motor off, try using a ratcheting strap or two to lift it up to the ceiling and get it out of the way.
     
  10. djaus
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    djaus Salted Nut!

    The transom exterior is coated with glass & resin, same with the outboard well. The only horrible timber inside the transom would be a sheet of 5 ply wedged between the glass & hardwood- (huon), I doubt it is rotten right through. Just the bottom section maybe 6 or 8 inches up from floor level. even with an outboard mount putting pressure on the transom nothing is indented or out of shape, so it's safe to say the timber in the mid to upper section is solid. Since I removed most (90%) of the wet wood (floor & transom) the rest is drying out nicely. Next, everything will get a couple coats of DOT & then I can start rebuilding. I've cut a piece of 7 ply to fit to, & strengthen the transom - Once the DOT on the boat is dry it will also get a coat of DOT (& dried) then be screwed, glued & clamped to the transom, also the 3 bolts for the 2nd outboard mount will help to pull it in. Once it's in, I'll fill the gaps under it & between the stringers with extra ply (DOT treated) to strengthen the floor & the "hull to transom" joint, then those areas will get glass & resin. It's a bit complicated to explain but basically the extra bits of ply between & level with the stringers will have a bevel on the front edge to aid in water drainage. I guarantee no water will penetrate the transom timbers once I'm finished with it! Should have my DOT delivered tomorrow & will get a few coats on. Should be able to start rebuilding the rear of the cockpit area by the weekend, although with my stepdad helping me we are constantly bouncing ideas around to make the boat safer, stronger & more user friendly which can add a few extra jobs to the project here & there. Today for example we came up with the idea for a fish cleaning station on one of the rear sections of transom deck. Resin & paint the top, build up some 2' sides with a gap above the transom for draining. Drop a chopping board in then slosh a bucket of water in it to clean up after the fishy bit & wash all muck over the back!
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2016
  11. djaus
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    djaus Salted Nut!

    Finally summed up the energy to get the cab & cockpit ready for DOT, (which I received today-5lt bottle of Protectimber). So...about 4 hours with a wire brush, every stringer, every piece of ply hull, the sheer....basically everything I could reach including under the bow. All vacuumed out & ready for DOT tomorrow. Might get the false transom in by late afternoon & get the aft decks back on by the end of the week along with the new bracing for the cockpit frames. Need to create another sub frame on the front of the shortened outboard well too, I plan to make one large cross member & incorporate the front of the outboard well into it. Maybe by the weekend I'll get to sanding the deck & cab & give them a coat of DOT too. Electric belt sander will make quick work of it with the wire brush into the corners & such.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2016
  12. djaus
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    djaus Salted Nut!

    Loaded up the DOT today, specially the transom. So much so that with the excess that dribbled back to the floor I pretty much got a second coat done on the worst bits.
     
  13. buzzman
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    buzzman Senior Member

    Is that hull more orange or dark yellow 'yolk' colour...?? Hard to tell form the small sample.

    Either one is hard to get looking right unless the surface is perfect and you're a 'gun' painter.

    Why not do the whole boat in white, and put a couple of thin stripes along the garboard?

    Maybe do the 'below waterline' section in contrasting colour, the sheer in white with a thin red stripe, the upper works in white, with some small timber details picked out in varnish, and use white fabric with a red accent line in the soft furnishings...?

    Having said that, I think the orangey colour you've drawn is not bad...I just know it's hard to pull off without it looking like a life boat.

    I remember my bro's old glass half cab Haines had white/cream hull and orange upperworks, and the gelcoat was fine...till it started to fade and went a soft pastelly shade of pinky-orange....but it looked good when it was new! :)
     
  14. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There are a lot of things you can do to affect the visual impact a boat might have. If it has tall sides, a wider than normal dark cove stripe, will lower this look. There are many other visual tricks you can play, particularly with the tall deck structure you've drawn.

    [​IMG]

    Several tricks used in this paint job. Can you guess what they are?
     

  15. buzzman
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    buzzman Senior Member

    Niiiice boat!

    OK, guessing: red underwater area to limit area to paint when anti-fouling; white stripe to break up contrast between red and blue, but maybe also to provide an easy section to repaint where the worst growth tends to be, on the waterline and just above it; timber gunnel to reduce the impact of the blue and break line that continues into the upper works; white topsides for sun reflection to keep it cool inside; varnish on upperworks for that 'olde boate' look, but also where it's easiest to manage and maintain..

    Whaddideye miss? ;)
     
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