hardware help for human powered ocean boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by gregk, Jan 7, 2007.

  1. gregk
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: http://www.adventuresofgreg.com

    gregk GregK

    I am building a human powered boat for an ocean crossing and I need to source some hardware that I am having a difficult time finding.

    The canopy top is designed to hinge from any one of 4 directions: hinge forward, right side, left side or backward. What I am looking for is a latch/hinge or sometimes known as a 'pivot hinge'. The ones that I have found require the removal of a pin to convert the hinge to a latch. I would like to find something a little more robust where the activation of a handle would lock it down rather than fiddling with a pin.

    I'm also looking for some good hatches for the front and rear bulkheads, and some decent water proof vents for the cockpit compartment and sleeping area in the stern.

    Any advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks!
    Greg K
    http://www.adventuresofgreg.com

    Some info and pictures and drawings of the boat "within" here:
    http://www.adventuresofgreg.com/HPB/aboutboat.html

    the main HPB building blog is here:
    http://www.adventuresofgreg.com/HPB/HPBmain.html

    bo[​IMG]at
     

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  2. Loveofsea
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    Location: Southern California

    Loveofsea New Member

    Fascinating endeavor!

    It would be quite a feat to have a water tight hatch that could open from 4 sides. I would look at aircraft hardware. Most of it is not suitable for long term saltwater exposure, but you are only requiring a few months of service...

    There are basically one of two things that any given hull design is going to do well. One, a deep V will get you through the seas, but at rest it is very unstable. Two, a stable platform (flatter bottom with a hard chine) at rest, that will tend to be a little rougher while under way. But that you are only going at displacement speeds, the negative aspects of a more stable bottom would be negligible. For most boaters, the question is do you spend more time being at your destination or getting there? You will be doing both at the same time~

    You are going to need lots of good rest on your voyage, and that gets me to the point. The round chine of your design, despite the keel, looks like it will offer little lateral stability which may inhibit your ability to sleep in rough seas. ---Just a thought..

    Anyway, i'm envious of your trip! I can only imagine how unbelievably thrilling it would be to be a thousand miles offshore alone in a small boat. I will be following your trip with great interest~!
     
  3. gregk
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: http://www.adventuresofgreg.com

    gregk GregK

    The hull is a Nimbus sea kayak and the deck is a custom design. We're not sure about the ballast keel yet - depending on pool testing, we may not require any additional ballast. Pete Bray kayaked across the North Atlantic in a similar boat to Within, and he did not use a ballast keel.

    As far as sleep goes - I may be looking at a fully supported trans Atlantic speed record which means I could sleep on the support boat. However, I may need to take refuge in the rear compartment periodically, or may need to sleep back there to take advantage of following seas and tail winds making progress during sleeping hours. Either way, I am trying to plan on that rear space being usable for sleep or rest or refuge.

    gk
     
  4. Loveofsea
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    Location: Southern California

    Loveofsea New Member

    Sounds like you have the sleeping situation covered.

    You may be able to find (or fab) a spring loaded sliding bolt hinge with an over-center locking feature that would allow you to open three sides at a time. That would be really tricky if you used more than one hinge at the fwd and aft hinge points of the canopy because multiple hinges must have a common centerline and that becomes more complicated on a radius. It can certainly be done, but it would require some development time...

    I am trying to figure out why you need the canopy to open from all sides-

    The more versatility you have, the greater your options will be...?
     
  5. gregk
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    gregk GregK

    why on the 3 sided hinge

    I just want to be able to stay really versatile with that canopy top. I'll need to leave it open various amounts depending on how hot it is, and how rough the seas are, and the side that is open will depend on which direction the wind and sea spray is going. For exit to the top deck at the stern or bow, I'll need to open the canopy to the opposite direction. After sea testing, I may find that there is one single best way of opening that canopy, and could replace the hinged latches with something else, but until then, I want to keep all of my options open - including complete removal of the canopy top.

    Are there any mechanical engineers out there that would like to take a crack at designing a hinged latch for me?

    gk
     
  6. Loveofsea
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    Location: Southern California

    Loveofsea New Member

    You are going to want to run with that thing wide open on nice days :)

    The rear hinge will need to be extra strong at the attachment point.

    i can visualize the 'spring loaded sliding bolt hinge with an over-center locking feature' but i just don't know how to illustrate it for you...for me building and designing is only a means to an end....

    It would not be a difficult design, i hope that one of the design gurus steps up and offers a solution.

    Your cause is definately worth the effort!
     
  7. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    Gregk, Tri way hatches in Australia have a hinging latch, havn't seen em for a while but you should be able to track em down, maybe through Alfab marine windows, their standard hatch hinges & latches from opposite sides & is also compleatly removable, hence the Tri in Triway but you could probably do all sides. Regards from Jeff.
     
  8. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    If you are fully supported what do you need a hatch that opens four ways for? Seems like you will never be in danger or have to survive in marginal conditions.
     

  9. SolomonGrundy
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: lost

    SolomonGrundy I'm not crazy...

    Hpv

    As another builder of ocean-going HPVs, you may find that exixting equipment suppliers do not always have exactly what you'll need. There just isn't any market for such things yet. You may have to compromise availability vs. cost vs. function. My hatches atre custom built and vessel specific.
    Good Luck to us all.
     
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