Handy Personal Link Thread

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by rwatson, Nov 24, 2011.

  1. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I never had much luck with foam brushes. Thier edges leave skid marks , they do a poor job of painting inside corners, lay a very thin paint film and they lack the presicion of a bristle brush. The proper brush for tipping off is called a Laying off Brush. A popular brand in ANZA

    http://www.anza.co.uk/products/brushes/proffessional/perfect/101100p

    When pro laying off brushes are not availble, I use normal throw away chip brushes. Pro paint shops sell a quality brand of chip brush...better bristle denisty and less shedding.

    A very worthwhile applicator tool for certain projects is a paint pad.

    http://www.anza.co.uk/products/rollers/other-roller-products/384085p

    Paint pads leave a greater paint film thickness on horizontal flat surfaces.
     
  2. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,866
    Likes: 299, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    The correct technique with foam brushes is the trick. I have used them with a good deal of success in epoxy laying, and varnishing.

    The trick is to use the whole flat edge, not the tip of the wedge.
     
  3. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Im sure its technique. Practice and technique is everything.

    For instance I regularly trim my mustache and sideburns with a chainsaw. People think Im crazy...they just dont know the technique .

    And if you come across any of those Anza brushes or anything produced by Anza...foam rollers, serrated bog trowles, metal bubble busters...buy a few and put them in your bag of tricks.. Good stuff.
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 479, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It is all about technique and foam is the way to go. The biggest mistakes a novice makes tipping off are, a wet tipping brush and too much angle in their stroke. The brush needs to stay relatively dry and should be held nearly upright. A chip brush is the worst thing to use. Even the good ones are crap and have to be cut in half (if working epoxy), trimmed and have loose bristles removed. Prepping a brush in these ways, just isn't what you need. And in spite of all the precautions, you'll still have to fish a bristle out of the perfectly laid coating anyway. Even Rebecca Wittman has had a change of heart about foam in recent years.
     
  5. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,866
    Likes: 299, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

  6. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    OK, where is the boat?

    :)
     
  7. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,866
    Likes: 299, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Real soon, now real soon
     
  8. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    But what is the project?
     
  9. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    At least give us a hint?

    It must be a 40 to 60 foot catamaran? You wouldn't be so secret if it wasn't.

    Maybe a 46 foot Cirrus?

    Or, a 57 foot Atlantic?

    I am ready to come down and help for a week.
     
  10. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,866
    Likes: 299, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Nothing so exotic I am glad to say

    The basic concept being developed is discussed at
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/bo...sailer-power-cruiser-water-ballast-21999.html

    and the web site http://schoolroad.weebly.com/project-2.html

    Only up to scale model completion for 'proof of concept trials' at this point

    If the water tests don't work next week, its 5 years of mucking around, thousands of dollars spent, and hundreds of hours of mine and the designers time down the tube.

    But what could possibly go wrong ... :(
     
  11. pdwiley
    Joined: Jun 2008
    Posts: 1,002
    Likes: 86, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 933
    Location: Hobart

    pdwiley Senior Member

    Want a list?

    How's my rudder coming along? I'll be back in another month....

    Sydney boat show was - interesting. They generally didn't want my money though. So I'll spend it on other stuff instead.

    PDW
     
  12. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    Realy nice boat. More eleguant than the McGregor, and can please a lot of people.
    My only concern will be the side deck. Are they wide enough to go to the foredeck?
     
  13. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,866
    Likes: 299, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    In the revised version, the sidedecks are GONE ! Its over the cabin top or out through the foredeck hatch.

    This is to maximise internal room - from past experience, side decks are a waste of time on boat of this size.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Good move. I was going to mention that sidedecks are a waste of precious interior volume on a Micro cruiser.

    Obviously a bit of detailing will be needed to facilitate fore and after crew movement on deck and sail sheet leeds. .

    Build the cabin roof strong. A typical commercial port dock is 1.5 meters high. When alongside you will be boarding, jumping onboard with a case of beer, via the cabin top .
     

  15. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    Yes it is a good point. But are you not afraid the over crowned cabin top will make the outside passage difficult?
    Of course the hatch can be the safest solution.

    [​IMG]
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.