Haines Signature 1750LE floor

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by Miles B, Aug 18, 2018.

  1. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    There must be some screws holding that tank down, or was ?
     
  2. Miles B
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    Miles B Junior Member

    Sorry I forgot.. the tank was actually riveted down.
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Obviously if a tank is easily removeable, it is less critical as to its condition, though a failure at sea especially, or anywhere else, is undesirable. Have a good look over it, and a water blaster would be useful.
     
  4. Miles B
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    Miles B Junior Member

    Yep, going to inspect for sure. Assuming it's in good shape though, I don't know how to make a flush floor with it. I'm also not sure how I'd make a flush floor with a new lower tank. Would I put a single piece on top of the side floors, or a middle section between them at the same level?
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    You can just screw some ply down over the top, to make access to the (lower) tank easy, but I think I'd stick with what you have, if it is in OK condition.
     
  6. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Does the boat have any flotation foam installed ? I'd want that kind of insurance, and particularly is a boat that is getting on a bit.
     
  7. Miles B
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    Miles B Junior Member

    Not sure. There are drain plugs between all of the under floor sections and the bilge behind the tank. I'd have to cut holes in the floor to check but I sort of doubt there's foam in there.
     
  8. Miles B
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    Miles B Junior Member

    I pulledthe tank. It is virtually spotless inside and out. I don't know how. It also has the boat build date written on the bottom in paint marker. It is 30 years old this year. The floor and stringers seem solid. My only real problems with it are that I want a flat floor and the tank and batteries shifted forward. I went to see a boat builder . He recommends moving the batteries and tank forward, and glassing a false floor over top of everything. Probably add an inch to my floor height.
     

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  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Sometimes they look OK, but internally, where even a tiny amount of sludge lies ( condensation provides the water), they develop "cancer". I certainly would not be glassing a floor down over an old tank, I would go for something that can easily be removed. Have to say, that sounds like a well cared for/little used boat.
     
  10. Miles B
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    Miles B Junior Member

    Really good point. I'll pull the sender again and the other access port for a better look. If I'm not able to get a really thorough look inside I'll definitely replace it if I can't figure a way to have the floor removable. The back of the tank is easily the lowest point when it's trailered, so I'll pay particular attention there. I am leaning towards a plastic tank.
     
  11. missinginaction
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    missinginaction Senior Member

    Welcome to the forum Miles.....I've read through your posts and have a question/comment. The old aluminum tank, it's rectangular, right? It looks like that piece of plywood or fir planking supported a rectangular tank. If you're going to replace the tank with a plastic unit, how about a belly tank? I've done this on runabouts. If you do use a belly tank, I'd suggest that you simply block the tank in using some framing lumber. That expanding foam that people use absorbs water, and can easily rot any wood that's in the area. Buy the tank to fit that cavity with a few inches clearance between the tank and the stringers that form the sides. Cut the lumber to fit between the tank, the inside bottom of the hull and the stringer(s). It's going to be a trapezoidal shape, if you remember your high school geometry. That's a pretty big cavity. You might also consider how much fuel you need to carry. I had a 18 foot runabout some years ago. It had a 30 gallon tank. I replaced it with a 15 gallon model, moved the tank forward and left the space behind the new tank empty. You could fill any empty space with some closed cell foam flotation if you'd like. I epoxied some lumber to the inside of the hull and the stringers to keep the tank in place, fore and aft. It improved the performance of the boat a bit by moving the center of gravity forward, and I saved about 100 lbs. I didn't need to carry 30 gallons anyway.
     
  12. Miles B
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    Miles B Junior Member

    The current space there is 6' x 2' x 8". The rectangular aluminum tank fits in there with a little clearance on all four sides and doesn't rest on the bottom. The flange on the top of the tank sits on top of the stringers and the tank is suspended in place.

    I need to measure the depth of the current tank but I believe it's going to be about 180-200 litres (47 - 52 US gallons). That's more than I'll ever need. Sant Marine is just up the road from me and they manufacture poly tanks. I'm looking at one that is 23" x 5.5" x 6'4" for 115 litres or 30 gallons. That way I can just move the tank up to the bulkhead and cover the gap between the stringers with a deck height panel. No frame and false floor over the existing decks either side. Less work, materials, weight, stuff to go wrong. A little more expensive but a new tank too.
     

  13. Miles B
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    Miles B Junior Member

    I've bought a poly tank that will sit down in the floor, and will glass a ply floor section above it. Thanks all for your advice :)
     
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