Had my old boat scanned

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by CC Guy, Sep 27, 2011.

  1. CC Guy
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: UK

    CC Guy Junior Member

    HI Guys

    I'm new here thought you like to see how my old wreck came out after scanning, I'm looking to use it to input into our cnc router,I ran across this site looking for something had the scan done a months back.

    DSC02368.JPG

    boat_lofts_001.jpg

    boat_shell_001.jpg

    boat4.jpg

    scan_boat2.jpg

    Roger
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    This is very impressive technology. What do they use as fiducials to keep the scan accurate?
     
  3. CC Guy
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    CC Guy Junior Member

    Hi CatBuilder,

    Thanks, as you can see its a hand held scanner that scans over the markers (dots you see) and builds the scan,works with lasers going back and forth, and is very accurate I'm told, you can see the layers of paint on the full size copy, the guy has had to reduce the file size for us to work with in our cad/cam system, as you can see she in bad shape and he scanned the good parts and mirrored to build the full hull and frames, took him a morning to scan,then a day or two to build up the cad drawings.

    Roger.
     
  4. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Ah, thank you for explaining. I thought the white dots were being projected from the handheld device. If they were placed on the hull ahead of time, that makes more sense as a set of fiducials.
     
  5. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    CC Guy,

    Can you tell us the system used for the scan? Commercial name etc?

    Marc
     
  6. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    Please tell us the purple ones the paint! :D

    Very cool tool.
    Something the Coast Guard should start bringing along. Find those poor souls in the bottom of the boats and stuff.

    Still what a great repair tool.
    good stuff :cool:

    DE
     
  7. CC Guy
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    CC Guy Junior Member

    Hi Guys,

    Glad to see you like it shame they can only scan and not rebuild as well,the guy said it was made in Canada, which is where I found the boat and had shipped over to the UK :)

    Lets see if I can get a link to work,
    http://www.creaform3d.com/en/handyscan3d/products/default.aspx?v=a

    If not working search Creaform 3D scanners.

    Roger.
     
  8. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: SF bay

    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    Any hints on what those sell or lease for currently?

    Web page is all about "request a quote" and I don't really want to bother them if no way in hell I can afford one.

    No worries, I'm sure in 5 years it will be $1000 for even better one.

    Do they import data into Solidworks or other CAD as surface, or Solid w/some default back-thickness or what? Thin-Feature?


    The website speaks of no more "volume scanning" as a good thing, but doesn't say what VS was. Only thing I can google is office supply paper scanners.
     
  9. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    I would like to understand what they are basically doing. I don't know how they are relating the measurements between each position of the hand scanner. Having delt with "photogrammetry" which they also reference, I would seriously doubt an accuracy of .004", since the aircraft firm I work for has two systems which make the same claim but neither one can manage two successive scans to get the points within that same tolerance. The photogrammetry system we use cost in excess of $500K.

    Marc
     
  10. ACuttle
    Joined: Aug 2008
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    ACuttle Marine Design Engineer

    The scanner units I've used were fixed, rather than hand held, which cost around £50-70K ($100-140K) - but then you'd only be want to use on for a day to do the boat, so they’re better to hire rather than own.

    (I'd guess one of these costs around £20-40K)

    Without the scanning experience you would likely want someone else to do the scan for you and process the data. Scanners produce point clouds which then you need to manipulate into meshes and other usable data.

    I'm not 100% about what it terms volume scanning but my guess is that it implies that you can perform the scan in a single operation rather than multiple scans which one then stitches together.

    <Edit>
    Having blown the picture up I can see that it isn't using targets, rather they are light spots. If there are no control targets and one still has a high accuracy level then it is a very smart machine and likely more dear for it.

    <Previous Comment>
    A downside of this method would be the small targets placed on the model, I would expect that it uses this to continuously reference its positions so every angle of scan is controlled. From experience I can say that sticking on the multiple targets is a pain in the ***, especially for any vessel larger than the one shown. With a fixed scanner one can get away with only 4-6 control points, which can be external from the target object.


    Either way it's an impressive bit of kit and scanning technology has come on greatly in the last 10 years.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2011
  11. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I've been hoping for a simple scanner using a single digital camera twice.

    Have two tripods set up, then some 'sweeper' similar to a regular laser-level to paint the surface with a grid. Instead of just horizontal and vertical lines it should throw out a GRID of lines every 1/2" or cm, so the camera can take a nice pic of how these lines bend as they fall on curved surfaces.

    Take two pics (one from each tripod) and feed the date into a computer to get a decent idea of the shape so you can then model parts from a surface of complex curves using CAD.

    Not meant for documenting archeological artifacts, but good enough for boat hull shapes or autobody add-ons, or quickly getting all the interior dimensions of a space into a CAD program.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    So when will people be scanning in boats and trading designs peep to peer, like music, videos or anything else that can be digitized?
     
  13. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    The typical use will be for people to get their new boat checked to see if it is twisted, warped, hollowed, etc, so you can get some quality control on the builder.
    Expensive boats will get more expensive, racers will demand it no matter what, cheaper boats will come with reams of disclamers, lawyers will get more rich, and everyone will debate wether it made any difference.
    A few will use them for historical documentation but hide the data, since it cost them a lot.
    The state of Texas had a photogrammetry system demonstrated to document an Indian cave dwelling. It only took 4 days (the equipment had to be backpacked into the site), was correlated with color photos so you could tell what the point data matched and was apparently a great success. No noticeable use of the data and no followon uses of the technology.
    This seems like such an interesting and usefull technology, but typically costly and requiring experts in the data useage.
    I bet some Olympic sailors are using it to get their boats absolutely fair.

    Marc
     
  14. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    CC Guy,

    I don't want to intrude on your business or finances, but would you be willing to estimate what the scanning and data reduction/ transfer cost?

    Please feel free to decline, but an understanding of the actual cost for a specific boat might give others the information to consider doing it for another project.

    The guys who scanned your boat might get more business also.

    Thanks, Marc
     

  15. Gripenland
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Gripenland Junior Member

    I use this technology daily at my job in the automotive industry. It can be really effective in the right application. The number of manufacturers of this type of equipment has exploded in the last years and the cost has dropped rapidly.

    We recently tested a hand held device no bigger then a video camera that didn't need markers on the object being scanned. The scan of an object was really fast and simple. However, the post processing was slow.
    But Imagen walking around in an boat show with this device. You could easily copy a number of designs in an hour :eek:

    This problem is already a fact in the automotive industry.
     
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