Gypsy Moth IV plans

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by KZ007, Feb 13, 2016.

  1. Tanton
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Tanton Senior Member

    G-M IV had a very interesting accommodation plan that i have. No lines plan. I worked for John for 1 1/2 years in the 60's.
    The basic problem with the boat is the combination of a light displacement with slack bilge and too much deadrise. It just does not work.
     
  2. bpw
    Joined: May 2012
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    bpw Senior Member

    Read the book, Chichester was not happy with the boat. I think the owner/skipper not liking the boat and it needing extensive modifications is pretty much the definition of "less than ideal"

    I have read that Chichester asked for design specifics that differed from Primrose's normal way of doing things and would not be convinced otherwise, so not really the designers fault.
     
  3. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    Which begs the question: How much deadrise or bilge slackness is too much? Here's another light displacement boat with high deadrise. Bill Garden's Oceanus was 60' x 12', about 36,000 lbs disp on a 48' waterline. The owner/designer/builder was very happy with her for 12 years.

    Oceanuslines.jpg
     
  4. Jamie Kennedy
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    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    "Now that I have finished, I don't know what will become of Gipsy Moth IV. I only own the stern while my cousin owns two thirds. My part, I would sell any day. It would be better if about a third were sawn off. The boat was too big for me. Gipsy Moth IV has no sentimental value for me at all. She is cantankerous and difficult and needs a crew of three - a man to navigate, an elephant to move the tiller and a 3'6" (1.1 m) chimpanzee with arms 8' (2.4 m) long to get about below and work some of the gear."

    from wikipedia
     
  5. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    When a man talks like that you know he's ready to sink the damn thing!
     
  6. bpw
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    bpw Senior Member

    Interesting to think that Gypsy Moth was one of the very first boats designed with long distance single handed sailing as its purpose. Would have been amazing if they got it right the first time around.

    Would love to read about the thinking that went into the boats design.
     
  7. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Tad Boat Designer

    John Illingworth wrote a good design discussion, explaining the compromises involved, in his book Further Offshore. I believe Tabarly's Pen Duick II was one of the first boats designed strictly as a offshore single-hander. Gypsy Moth IV was not strictly a racer but was expected to be used as a cruiser after the record voyage. For this reason Chichester insisted on full headroom under the flush deck forward. If this had not been the case she would have had lower freeboard.

    Gypsy Moth IV followed the design of PD II in her long fine overhang aft, which Tabarly subsequently sawed off!
     

  8. bpw
    Joined: May 2012
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    bpw Senior Member

    Thanks, never read that book. Just ordered a copy.
     
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