grinder woes...

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by robwilk37, Mar 22, 2012.

  1. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    I've given up on controlling dust. I just grind with 36 as the maximum grit and usually go down to 24 for grinding any glass. Also, I grind on slower speeds. This keeps larger "dust" coming off in "snowflake" type consistency, instead of putting micro dust all in the air.

    It's just too cumbersome to use a dust skirt, as Michael points out. I can't stand dragging a vacuum hose around with the grinder. Cramps my style when trying to make a perfect shape.

    If anything, Hoyt's idea is the way to go when you are really working full time.

    You just vacuum up the shop or the hull from time to time if to get rid of the dust. You have to vacuum the surface when you are done sanding anyway, so really no big deal.
     
  2. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 731
    Likes: 96, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1324
    Location: MD

    bntii Senior Member

  3. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Random orbit sanders?

    We're taking about grinders, I think, right?

    [​IMG]

    11 Amps
    7" Wheel Diameter
    2,560 Max Watts Out - Almost 7 TIMES more powerful than that Fein in the link!!
    0-600/3,400 rpm No-Load Speed
    5/8-11" Spindle Thread
    Spindle Lock
    Electronic Speed Control - constant speed control, soft start, and two-way variable speed controls located on the trigger and dial for flexibility and control
    10-19/32" Tool Length
    Heat resistant bearing chamber and iron ball bearings to extend tool life and durability
    6.2 lbs Tool Weight

    These are what you use to do grinding on a boat, not a random orbit sander. These are industry standard. That Fein is just a little toy... like one of these.... ha ha ha ;)

    [​IMG]

    ---- Just having some fun bntii. No personal insult intended.
     
  4. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 731
    Likes: 96, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1324
    Location: MD

    bntii Senior Member

    Free grinding green epoxy eh cat?- hope you don't get sensitized before you finish that build of yours.
    I do it for a living cat- you won't ever find me free grinding glass and I work to limit the need in any case and yes that Fein is a industry standard for its type.

    If you keep finding yourself sculpting your glass work with that grinder of yours- you are doing it wrong.

    Just kidding..
     
  5. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Who grinds green epoxy? That would be dumb and wouldn't work anyway.

    I sculpt core with it or use it to nip off glass overhangs at the end - to make a flat edge on a panel, or to take out a random void.

    Good luck with your girly little pink Fien. You must get paid by the hour to want to use that underpowered thing.

    Just kidding...
     
  6. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 731
    Likes: 96, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1324
    Location: MD

    bntii Senior Member

    Ha- good on ya Cat.

    This made me think green glass:

    Snowflake is what you see coming off green epoxy-tough way to go for those few who will get sensitized. ('green': cured to rigid only. Out to a day or so in cool temps for common boat yard resins)
    Edge work as you say above is tough- the dust just flies..

    I actually just picked up yet another sander.
    I got one of the Mirka's:

    http://mirka-online.com/mirka-tools...h-compact-electric-random-orbital-sander.html

    Form factor of the Dynabrades, so very handy for smaller work & yes a EXCELLENT dust collection ability.

    Years back I did need to do a repair job and pulled out the bad old Bosch right angle with 8"- 16 grit disks, free grinding till I couldn't see my hand in front of my face and had to scoop up the dust with a snow shovel.
    I don't advice it I can tell ya.
     
  7. Brian2009
    Joined: Jan 2011
    Posts: 22
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

    Brian2009 Junior Member

    As far as sanding epoxy goes (and I'm looking for confirmation here) a few days after it's placed/cured, I assume the dust is inert and largely more of an inconvenience rather than a health threat?

    What about cabosil prior to encapsulation in epoxy? I've read the manufacturers spec, but thought I would ask others their thoughts?
     
  8. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Just don't breathe it. Use a mask.
     
  9. thill
    Joined: Mar 2007
    Posts: 82
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 26
    Location: Virginia, USA

    thill Junior Member

    I'm very inexperienced, compared to most of you, but I DO have very good system for controlling dust.

    I'm a contractor by trade, and a few years ago, I bought a ShopVac on sale. It came with a FREE DEMO dust filter bag. I tried it and couldn't believe how well it worked!

    Use the yellow bags made for drywall dust/ash. WOW, do they work! You can collect pounds and pounds of fine dust, and NOTHING will come out of the exhaust! We use this system exclusively in the high-end remodeling jobs that are our mainstay. Keeping major jobs dust-free is part of the reason we are so highly referred. (Our business is 100% referral)

    Anyway, in the boats, what I do is turn on the vac and lay the hose down next to where I'm grinding, and then grind toward the vac. All of the light, airborne stuff gets sucked in immediately. Some of the heavy stuff will be laying on the bottom, but that's easy to vacuum before moving on.

    This system has changed my life! You go through so many fewer dust masks and you barely even get itchy! It works great with tools that have dust shrouds, but I never use those anymore. I just bring the hose with me wherever I grind.

    I use a good-quality 6.5 HP ShopVac brand machine, and am SUPER happy with the system. Probably not enough for some major project, but works great for floor replacements and general repairs.

    -TH
     
  10. tomherrick
    Joined: Sep 2006
    Posts: 90
    Likes: 1, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 14
    Location: Versailles, Kentucky

    tomherrick Junior Member

    Perhaps I'm overcautious, but I use the drywall bags and an HEPA filter in the shop vac these days. On occasion, I find a hole in the bag and a clogged HEPA filter that provided backup.
     
  11. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 2,936
    Likes: 140, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1593
    Location: Arlington, WA-USA

    Petros Senior Member

    But, you still get itchy. I built one fiberglass boat when I was in high school, I went to bed itchy for 2 weeks. I have not built a fiberglass boat since, but have built over 14 small boats (all wood), and will avoid fiberglass as much as I can.
     
  12. thill
    Joined: Mar 2007
    Posts: 82
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 26
    Location: Virginia, USA

    thill Junior Member

    Tom,
    Good point! I also like the hepa filters.

    Yes, the bags can tear, especially if you throw the vacuum around, and you have 20# of debris in it.

    I very rarely tear a bag anymore with boat work. When the vacuum starts getting heavy, I just change bags. And I have a dedicated 16-gallon vacuum that only works in the shop. I have a little 10-gallon that I take on my truck. That's the one that occasionally tears bags.

    -TH
     
  13. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    You guys use bags?

    I set my shop vacs up like the used to be set up. I wrap the filter with a piece cut from the bag that came with the shop vac originally, then empty the big plastic bin when it gets too full.


    Bags are kind of a scam.
     
  14. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 731
    Likes: 96, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1324
    Location: MD

    bntii Senior Member

    [​IMG]

    Dust... what dust?
     

  15. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    "I get paid by the hour so i use a sander instead of a grinder."

    "I waste company money buying vacuum bags instead of thinking up smarter ways to do.things that provide the exact same number of barriers to dust in the shop vac."

    You ought to be fired.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.