Gravy Boat, Custom Albin 25

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Yobarnacle, Feb 5, 2016.

  1. Jim Caldwell
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    Jim Caldwell Senior Member

    I too have been admiring your work for awhile now.
     
  2. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Thanks Jim.

    My understanding from hearsay, is the newly manufactured Albin 25s were delivered to the USA from Sweden, on their own bottoms.
    And, they were designed to operate in the NORTH SEA, an area notorious for rough weather.
    I have great confidence in the ALBIN 25 hull form and stability. There is no lead or ballasted keel incorporated in the ALBIN 25. All stability is due to morphology (body type).

    But I'm not comfortable with the idea of taking a 25 foot plastic boat deep sea.
    I KNOW what's out there! Been there and got the tee shirt! 43 years at sea.

    'GRAVY' is being refitted/modified as a gold hunting boat, not a ocean cruiser. Probably still could go to sea. I haven't diminished the designs stability in anyway.

    It's still perfectly legal to stake gold claims on public land.
    But when you leave, you must leave the site in exactly the same condition you found it in! EPA says.

    Consider 'GRAVY' a portable prospectors cabin.
    With ability to motor/sail. ;)
    Provisions, water, fuel, and clothing for two weeks endurance is the stowage parameter.
    For drinking and cooking, a gallon of potable water per day/per person seems reasonable. My wife and myself would need 28 gallons for two weeks.
    My 4 demijohns hold 5.8 gallons each, and I have a couple 6 gallon jerrycans. Totals 35 gallons, 25% more than minimum.
    Not everyone can import 22 liter Mexican demijohns, but use what is locally available. :)
     

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  3. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Raw water will be used for cleaning and washing. Whether rain catchment, or what we're floating in.
    Most likely, we'll be afloat in reasonably clean fresh water in some gold bearing stream..
    Emergency drinking water can be made by straining/filtering out detritus and debris, then exposing the water to at least 3 hours of direct sunlight, in a clear plastic bottle such as soft drinks come in. PET plastic says on bottom of bottle.
    3 hours of intense UV will kill all micro-organisms and viruses.
    Most brown color in water is the tannin from tree bark. Won't hurt you any more than the tannin in iced TEA!
    You CAN invest in fancy filters, if you plan to deliberately subsist on local available water supply.
    I DO have a nice one, a gift.
    You can also carry LOTS of chlorine bleach with you for cleaning, removing mildew, and purifying water.
    I have a plastic jar, about 1 gallon size, full of swimming pool chlorine tablets, enough to chlorinate at least a hundred swimming pools filled with water. CHEAP bleach, just add water!

    In the picture, the canister on top, inverts and telescopes into the base canister, as seen in closed position.
    The white ceramic filter elements are replaceable and screw into the bottom of top can.

    There is a shiny lid I'm not showing in photo.

    Look for a container of chlorine tablets looks like this one, in the garden dept of favorite variety store.
     

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  4. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    I move from project to project, because I discovered by scientific observation, fiberglass resin cures just as fast by itself as when closely watched/supervised.
    No point wasting time, so work on something else while that project cures.

    One of the projects I've done some work on, as materials present themselves, is a PVC pipe rack for organized stowage of canned foods.
    So far, I've collected 5 pieces of PVC, each 3 ft long, sufficient diameter to insert different sized cans in.

    One skinny tube for canned soup, 2 for normal canned vegetable size, and 2 largest diameter for canned sweetpotatos and beef stew ect size.
    Lots of PVC gets pitched around here, but seldom in these larger diameters.
    To complete this project, I may have to BUY some! Palpitations and hyperventing! :frantic: (WHAT! No :frantic: emoticon?)

    Anyway, canned goods survive best if sprayed with a coating of Pledge or Behold or other furniture wax, prior to stowage.
    They are heavy, and best stowed low on a 25 footer.

    The PVC racks are pipes banded together, and the assembly dimensioned to lie flat in the bilge or under berths, any relatively unused space, out of the way, and not walked on.

    The assembly of PVC can-laden tubes, is hinged at bottom end, so can be raised to near vertical.
    New purchased cans feed in the tops of the tubes, insuring fifo rotation. (first in, first out)
    Cans you want are visible and dispensed via notch-outs in bottom of array.
    All gravity feed.
    A few holes drilled along length of pipes allows visual inventory when making shopping list.
    Array lies low and flat when not being accessed.

    A bit about canned goods.
    Just heating a can of something, fills the hole in your middle, but is hardly a memorable meal.

    Cans are cheap and don't need refrigeration, and don't rust if waxed.

    A little ingenuity in the recipe dept, makes these much more palatable.

    For one tip, drain off the canned water, and replace with fresh water for 5 minutes soak. The canned veggies taste MUCH fresher as a result!

    Example recipes:

    Can of spiced cabbage (not sauerkraut which I do like too!) plus a can of sliced carrots, a chopped fresh onion and raw quartered potatoes or small reds, and a can of corned beef, boiled in a quart of water, makes a fine dinner.

    Canned yams sparkle when a little pumpkin pie spice dusted on them.

    Canned pumpkin so seasoned is a fine vegetable side. It is a squash, you know.

    Cranberry sauce, whole or jellied, isn't just for thanksgiving! Mandarin orange slices a good side , too! They're canned tangerines, did you know?


    A can of sausage hash (in store rack beside the cornedbeef hash) mixed with a can of sausage gravy, and ladled over fresh hot biscuits, ain't to be sneezed at!


    Instant mashed potatoes much improved if mixed with a can of cream of potatoes' soup concentrate and can of condensed milk.


    Buy sweet chili sauce in the Chinese food section and grape jelly, to mix/simmer a portion of each together, makes a "killer" barbecue sauce. Add a can of pulled pork or a canned ham fork shredded, make great barbecue sandwiches.

    Can go on and on, but only trying to inspire your imaginations. :p

    German potato salad in the can, livens up many lackluster canned vegetable dishes, like mixing it with can of cut green beans and heating together.

    Speaking of green beans, the French style mixed with Lipton instant onion soup packet and can of cream of mushroom soup, baked as a casserole would please even Mom!

    Small early peas in the can, taste better than the fat mushy variety.

    Canned Asparagus tips with a can of cream mushroom or cream of asparagus soup is pretty good stuff.

    Even the ubiquitous canned 'mixed vegetables", when drained, marinated with Italian salad dressing, and chilled, makes a really decent topping for a wild greens salad!

    Or try over the dried roasted seaweed sheets sold for making sushi! Just tear the healthy, flavorsome, sheets into salad rags for your salad masterpiece. Sprinkle the seaweed, mixed vegetable salad with smoked herring fish bits from a can of kippered snacks. Complete with topping of freshly diced onion!

    Bread sticks in the box last well, and an elegant accompaniment for this salad. Breaks up nicely into croutons and bread crumbs too, for various uses.

    Canned 3 bean salad same aisle as the German potato salad, mixed with drained canned sliced beets and fresh sliced onion, as a cold salad. Save the beet juice for making borscht.

    Also cold canned refried beans thinned with olive oil and garlicked up as a dip.
    Pork skins great dipping chips!

    Canned yellow squash with canned cheddar cheese soup, ritz crackers, onion, and bacon bits, mixed in a casserole! Hmmm.
    Or rice/cheese soup casseroles with almost any canned vegetable you can name!

    A dozen pimento stuffed green olives warmed together with any canned beans variety is festive and exotic in flavor and presentation! The green olives don't need refrigeration being packed in brine (salt) in their jar.

    Salt pork, sometimes called white bacon, doesn't need refrigeration and seasons up almost any vegetable.
    In fact, the secret of Southern cooking, a world class cuisine, is pork lard and sugar in everything! :D

    For the crispiest home made French fries, dust the raw slivered potatoes with confectioners sugar prior to frying. The light dusting of powdered sugar becomes a crispy brown glaze on the surface of the fries!

    Enjoy!


    "I THINK THEREFORE I EXIST." hmm Descartes?
    "I think therefore I LIVE WELL rather than merely existing!" says me.

    Fresh cabbages, onions, potatoes and eggs last at LEAST two weeks without refrigeration, if kept in dark, cool, ventilated storage.
    If having doubts about stored eggs, put them in a pot or deep bowl of water. Discard any that float. (putrefaction gas inside, DON'T break!)
    Any that sink to bottom are still good.


    Back to the project, 6 cans stack in 3 ft of PVC.
    No way wife and I would eat 6 cans of food per day between us.
    But for variety sake, and the cans DO last more than 2 weeks, I want a total of 15 tubes, 3 arrays of 5 pipes each. Capable of stowing 90 canned goods. Even with 15, some cans will be mixed with varied others in some tubes, as I like more than 15 different foods.
    Gonna have to buy some PVC, darn it!
     
  5. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Feel free to jump in with non-refrigerated recipes, at anyplace/anytime in this thread.

    example: I pickle beef hotdog wieners in the jalapeño peppers juice left in the gallon jars of jalapeño peppers I buy and consume rapidly.
    and pickle hardboiled eggs in another jalapeño peppers juice gallon jar. Neither require refrigeration.
    Peppers a great source of vitamins!

    My deviled eggs are devilish indeed! HOT STUFF! :D
     
  6. Justaguy
    Joined: Nov 2015
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    Justaguy Junior Member

    Nice recipe ideas. Do those come from your years of "sea" food?

    Question: I'm a sucker for contraptions. However, what does this PVC tube idea give you over just stacking cans in some appropriate place?
     
  7. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Good questions.

    No, the canned goods recipes come from camping, hunting, canoeing trips, where you take enough for one to three days. And no or limited refrigeration.
    There is a lot of envy when you have a nice meal at days end, and your companions are eating pork-N-beans straight from the fire warmed can.
    So, in return for my cooking for all, I enlisted space for a few cans in the backpacks of each of my friends. :)
    Don't forget the cowpie spice.
    Tony Chachere's Creole Seasoning would make even cow doodoo taste good, I imagine!
    The ships and tugs I sailed, had room sized walk in freezers and chill boxes. While we also carried canned goods, it wasn't for lack of refrigeration.
    'GRAVY' has minimal refrigeration.


    Advantage of the tubes is :
    1. organized and easy to find the can you want. Tubes can be labeled with magic marker or grease pencil. Never Dull metal polish, erases both!
    2. can't move or shift or fall. Stable ballast when placed low and flat
    3. protected from wet and scrapes. Labels remain intact longer.
    4. EZ inventory when replacing what was used
    5. guaranteed oldest cans used first, no forgotten, wasted, expired or rusted out cans.
    6. space efficient. Other bulky items can be stored on top of tubes.

    Where is the suitcase locker? above the canned goods. Just temporarily, for a few minutes, move a few empty suitcases to get to the cans once a day.
    Get the cans for both lunch and supper at same time!

    Or, cans in tubes can be on TOP of a built in fuel tank. Won't be contaminated by diesel fumes will they?

    Or under clothes beneath a bunk.
    Move the dungarees out long enough to grab a couple cans, then all goes back. :D
    Drier dungarees too!
     
  8. Justaguy
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    Justaguy Junior Member

    OK, last tricky question for the moment: Seems there is a "can-undrum". If you take the label off to spray the furniture polish on the can for preservation, then you have no label. If you don't, then you only spray top and bottom, which isn't likely very effective. So, what's a girl to do? ;-)
     
  9. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    I don't remove labels.
    Just spray while on paper towels, invert after a few minutes and spray again.
    Ready to stow in about 10 minutes when dry.

    Spray a dozen cans at a time.

    Just a guy or just a gal, makes no difference.
    I'm VERY married! ;D

    The wax impregnated dried paper towels, work great for polishing stainless steel.
    Spraying the stainless leaves streaks.
     
  10. Justaguy
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    Justaguy Junior Member

    Ah, sort of dodged the question that time.

    Dagnabbit! And you were just my type! Well, except for gender, size, hairiness, and probably a few other things. But other that that ... golden!

    In this case, "what's a girl to do?" is just a saying rather than a declaration.

    So, "can" we move on now??


    (sorry, just couldn't resist)
     
  11. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Was just curios if it was a Freudian slip.
    As I said, gender doesn't matter on the forum.
    it's purely mental, not physical.
    :D
    Any other questions or comments?
    I appreciate the discourse.
    I WAS feeling like I was posting to myself!

    As to dodging questions, no.
    Ever seen a rusty unopened can?
    The ends always rust first. Usually the end the can has been sitting on, it's bottom rim is first to rust, whether the label is upside down or right side up.
    Inside the tubes, the cans are on their side. if moisture got inside the tube, the can side might show rust first.
    Don't know.
    But wouldn't expect rust in first 6 months, or the food to be un-eaten for 6 months.
    It's mentally lazy and wasteful to simply buy cases of canned goods, as many vessels do.
    Takes more effort and thought to plan menus and buy just those ingredients, but cost saving.

    That's not pre-determining precisely what you'll eat each date on the calendar.
    If you are planning three meals daily for 14 days, then plan menus for 42 meals and purchase the ingredients.
    Which menus are selected for todays meals, is whimsical.
    Selection gets narrower as the days pass, but that's true regardless of how you provision.
     
  12. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Are you going gold dredging Yo ?
     
  13. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Not quite dredging.
    More like vacuuming crevices and the sand laden water goes aboard into a whirlpool auto pan device I devised, so the heavy stuff falls to the bottom.
    These heavy materials centrifuged more, to recover gold super fine powder called flour gold, which is the bulk of the wash down gold in streams, and never captured by the old prospectors.
    Plan to revisit old abandoned claims that didn't "pan out" at 20$ an ounce.
    Might be worth prospecting at today's gold prices, though wasn't rich enough pickings to justify the effort and time investment back when.

    Any of that make sense? or am I muttering?

    Anyway, a trailer sailor is required to voyage to high altitudes! :D
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I know people with similar ideas, but over here there are laws that pretty well prohibit such activity, in most places. But with new technologies it is probably feasible, and the gold price being so high is a big help.
     

  15. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    The gold stake laws are still on the books in USA.
    Including the "PRUDENT MAN RULE". Which states if within 90 days, sufficient gold hasn't been recovered that a prudent man would continue, then, the claim must be abandoned.

    Prevents people from abusing the prospecting rights, intending to homestead on public land.

    EPA says you have to return the site to original condition when you leave, hence, my boat is my cabin, all self contained, leaving zero footprint when I leave.
     
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