Gravy Boat, Custom Albin 25

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Yobarnacle, Feb 5, 2016.

  1. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Regarding batteries.
    There are numerous new technologies on the cusp of arriving on market.
    NO immediate need for batterys, so I've delayed buying any, in hopes of soon having a wider choice.
    Question: Under currently available battery options, 6 volt golf cart batterys have the greatest anphours and longest life expectancy.
    If those are still my best alternative at purchase time, I plan to buy three and hook up three circuits.
    One dedicated 12v lighting circuit with batterys A&B, another dedicated 12v circuit for the refrigeration, batterys B&C, and the third 12v circuit, A&C for the 110ac inverter.
    A plan to easily revolve pairs of batterys, changing which circuits they feed, will assist keeping discharges nearly equal.
    Is there a problem with this tactic I'm not seeing?

    The switching plan is simple.
    Three twist lock outlets, each connecting different pairs of 6v batteries to get 12volts.
    And three twist lock plugs, each labeled for a different circuit.
    Easy to swap the plugs around.
     
  2. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Well, there IS a problem!
    If one battery fails, I'd only have one 12 volt source. The two remaining 6 volt batteries.

    The area under the tub originally had a 30 gallon potable water tank. That's 240 lbs of water.
    The designer recommended keeping that tank full at all times for performance reasons.
    Sounds more like a ballast tank than a potable water tank!

    Anyway, I trashed the 50 year old polyethylene water tank.
    In it's place I planned batteries for the required ballast.
    Since there is plenty of room, I'm putting 5 six volt batteries in the bow.
    That gives a total of 10 perturbations/permutations of 12 volt circuits instead of just 3.
    Also, it's about 200 lbs of batteries. In adittion, I'm storing a spare 5 gallon water demijohn in the bow, another 40 lbs.
    All concealed beneath the tip up tub/recliner.
    In this picture the battery boxes are loose and not yet glassed together into one bolt-in component.

    The other picture is of the tub hinges.
    I bought several 4 ft long, 3/8ths inch dia, frp rods from a farm supply, less than 2$ each.
    One is glassed into edge of tub where contacts forward bulkhead.
    Two stainless cable clips are bolted to the bulkhead so the frp rod is a captured axel pin.
    The cable clips cost 2 for one dollar. Strong hinge.
    Should the FRP rod wear out, which is not likely the few times the tub will be raised for battery service, drilling a couple of new holes allows relocating the clip hinges an inch away.

    You can also see, the forward bulkhead isn't merely painted a solid yellow.
    The yellow paint was dribbled onto a white background.
    Since very little exotic wood or varnish will be in the d├ęcor, value added is my labor.

    The yellow rivulets cascade is a silent memorial for me, my blood ( fiberglass nicks) and sweat exuded during this project.
    Decorating the cabin with my life's essences! :D
    Contributed a lot of DNA to this boat, could believe she's blood kin now!

    The verticle 1 inch stainless tube in the forepeak, is the focsle anchor locker drain pipe,
     

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    Last edited: Feb 19, 2016
  3. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Where will the water tank be located?
     
  4. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    No permanent water tank.
    Five gallon plastic watercooler bottles (demijohns ) and 5 gallon plastic jerrycans, as many as I find room to carry and want to.
    Adjustable ballast, and can be toted to the reverse osmosis filtered water machine, one dollar for 5 gals.


    I have a gimbaled cradle I made from a plastic five gallon bucket that holds a demijohn. Doesn't rust.

    The lower 2/3rds of bucket have 6 vertical , spaced 60 degrees apart, slits in sides, allowing the just a bit too narrow diameter bucket, below the top half, to expand and accept a demijohn.
    Cut across bottom also. Actually easier to lay out, if you cut the bottom first, into 6 equal pie slices ( or nearly equal), then continue cuts up sides.

    A couple screws through the bail holes, gimbals the bucket in a cabinet or yoke.
    I reinforced mine with some fiberglass strips in the support ring.



    [​IMG]

    Actually, my 4 demijohns, I brought with me from Mexico.
    Cast of thicker plastic and 22 liters capacity (5.8 gals), they cost $2 each in Mexico. US 5 gal bottles are same diameter but a bit shorter and cost 10$.

    Tip to pour. pour fast or slow, depending how far you tilt the bottle.
    Gravity is a zero maintenance water pump.

    Bottles are not too expensive and simple to replace, easy to clean and inspect.
    None of that is true for integral tanks.

    One of the demijohns is in the bow in above previous posted picture. Looking at it's dusty bottom view.
    FRP dust everywhere around my project..

    This tactic is scale dependent.
    Original tank was only 30 gals. Six 5 gal containers, those are handy and moveable side to side to trim vessel..
    A larger vessel carrying hundreds or thousands of gallons, or tons of water, five gallon bottles not gonna replace integral tanks. :D
     

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  5. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    There are so many projects, major and minor, that comprise 'GRAVY". Some, like the NOSE, isn't documented at all with photographs, just a before and after shot, and most have just a few snapshots of the construction, not at all a very complete story.
    My excuse is, my project wasn't writing a documentary, but building a boat.
    It simply wasn't often on my mind, to take pictures. More often, occupied with how to accomplish what I was trying to do.

    I also haven't bothered to organize pictures, and among photos I've collected from the internet are mixed my own photos of my two different Albin 25s. In one folder named ALBIN.

    1000s of photos, and I don't actually remember taking the photos, not looking for a particular photo, just looking through the mess and seeing a picture that recalls to me a project I did, then looking for more pictures about that project to make a presentation.

    So, thanks for being patient.

    Lots to show, just organizing it as I go. :D
     
  6. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Some of the projects are twins.
    Two stern drives is a good example.
    A number of projects were designed to be multifunctional, a different twin situation, two aspects.
    Anyway a few seemingly simple projects, grew in complexity until unexpectedly assumed major project proportions.

    Here is one. A doubled twin project, multifunctional, and installed in two different locations, and has multiple moveable parts.

    A sink.

    How awkward can it be to install a sink in...I'll change that word to lavatory.
    Boats and sink shouldn't be in the same paragraph, together, even!

    I need two lavatories, one in the cabin for brushing teeth ect, and one in the cockpit for the fish cleaning station. Simple.

    I'm not ALWAYS cleaning fish, or brushing my teeth, or anything else you can use a lavatory for. Most of the time it SITS there idle, just taking up space.

    A lavatory is a hole. A lidless box. A depression in a otherwise flat surface. It could HOLD something! something that was useful even when just sitting there.

    A drink cooler.
    Currently I don't have a picture but I'll take one to post in the morning light.
    I collected several peltier chip units from small cheap metal fridges pitched in the dumpster. What ever goes wrong with them, it's never the solid state peltier chips, which most small fridges have two of.
    I salvaged the chips.
    I'm not going to explain how they work, except 12 volts input, one side gets cold and the other side hot.
    Heat one side and chill the other side, they PRODUCE electricity, the more voltage depends on the greater temperature difference.

    Enough about that.
    I took a small 6 pack ice chest, just big enough for 6 cans of soda or beer, and in an hour, installed a peltier chip in the lid. Works GREAT.
    It will be convenient to have in the cockpit, in a secure location out of the way.
    Like nested in the fish cleaning lavatory. It's ALWAYS busy keeping the drinks cold, so it's NOT an idle space user.
    Also, my wife would enjoy having a mini fridge at her desk/vanity. which is also a convenient lavatory location, for her teeth brushing ect.
    She eats a lot of Jello. Good nutrition for hair and nails.
    Jello needs to be cold. she also likes to nibble on chilled fruit and salads.
    Only need ONE mini fridge, though.
    We'll both be in the cockpit, usually together, or she'll be at her vanity, and I'll be tinkering with something. She can have the fridge when we aren't fishing.
    I molded both fiberglass lavatories using the cooler as a male plug.
    Be a good idea to insulate those lavatories!
    Won't detract from service as lavatories but will improve refrigeration.
    Only adding a little more work to the project X 2.
    Lavatories need drains X 2.

    See what's happening?

    Here is a picture of the dash with engine instruments and steering removed.
    It will be the fish cleaning station. I roughly red inked in the lavatory position.


    [​IMG]

    More narrative and pictures in the morning.
    Ya'll come back again.
     

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    Last edited: Feb 19, 2016
  7. Justaguy
    Joined: Nov 2015
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    Justaguy Junior Member

    Multifunction

    Yobarnacle,

    Although I've just been reading your posts on this for a short time, I'm very impressed by the way that you try to make use of whatever you have, and more so, by your approach of thinking multifunctionally. I'm slowly designing my own boat piece by piece, and one of the reasons it's taking forever (other than my ignorance) is that I try to figure out how to make every part do creative, but reasonable double-duty (or more). Partly similar to the SWAB concept (Swiss Army Boat) that I first encountered on Dave Zeiger's Triloboat blog (gotta love that intro photo), but more along the lines of reversible jackets and long pants that unzip in the middle to become hiking shorts.

    In addition to the entertainment value ;-), you're an design inspiration. Keep it coming!

    Justaguy
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2016
    1 person likes this.
  8. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    thanks :D
     
  9. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Here are a picture of the peltier chip equipped drink tote, and the photo of the two castings I made from it's bottom.
    The castings were done a while ago, and I stumbled across the photo in my folio and it stirred up the memory that induced me to describe the project in the recent posts.
    I haven't found any more photos related to this project, not YET!
    The mini fridge picture I just took this morning.
    It fits in the insulated sinks built up around the two castings shown.

    Not ready to show finished projects yet. :D
     

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  10. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    The mini-fridge has another function.
    Not only did it serve as a mold, and keeps drinks cold, but in the salon, it plugs the sink to prevent cold wind and hungry insects from entering via the drain.
    Both sink drains are above the water line, and it's not likely water would be forced up into either sink, through the drain, from outside, but the mini-fridge would prevent it in the salon, if , in the unlikely event, it could happen. :cool:
     
  11. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    I LOVE repurposing things. it's a good talent at sea, because there ain't no stores out there, not YET anyway!

    But THIS?



    [​IMG]


    guess some of my own innovations may seem just as weird to some others.

    Okay! Live and let live. Good Luck fella!
     

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  12. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Found a sink project related photo.
    These are homemade plumbing parts.

    Obviously I didn't make the PVC pipe or vinyl hose.
    I did cast the fiberglass green weenie piece, as the drain spigot for one of the sinks. Inserts into the vinyl hose inserted into the one+ 1/2 inch PVC drain pipe.
    I glassed the PVC drain pipe against the inside hull skin as a permanent fixture. If I can't find a picture I'll take one of the finished installation.

    The sink's drain spigot was glassed into the bottom of the sink.

    The connecting vinyl hose is removable.

    The anti-siphon vent was made from the curved 3/4 inch PVC pipes.

    I learned from my Meican neighbors, you don't need to buy elbows and fittings.

    Stuff a rag in one end, or tie a string to the rag and push it inside a PVC pipe as a plug.

    Fill the pipe with heated sand. Or if you stuffed a rag down there, pour in enough hot sand to make the elbow at that location.

    In a few minutes, you can bend the PVC anyway you want.

    Including expanding an end forming a socket, by inserting another piece of the same diameter pipe in the softened malleable end.

    The hot sand prevents the pipe from collapsing and directs the heat to exactly where you want the elbow or bend.

    Wear heavy gloves. The sand needs to be about 250 degrees F, or hotter.

    Keep a bucket of cold water and another rag close by. When you're satisfied the bend is correct, apply the cold wet rag, to stop the bending and re-ridgid the PVC.
    Dump the sand and pull out the rag by the string you tied to it.


    Anyway, I make various bends, angles, elbows from scavenged dumpster PVC. Whenever I'm heating sand, I make spares.

    I used some of these pre bent SPARES to make a high looped vent for the drain, terminating in my anchor locker, where it's protected.

    This was also fiberglass wrapped and permanently glassed into the cabin structure.

    There is a short pliable hose in the vent line, as a disconnect and stress reliever.

    I'll see if I can get a picture that makes this installation clearer.

    Next. Maybe a propane tank something or other.... NAH!

    PS: I heat sand in an iron skillet on a portable electric hotplate. Plumbers in Mexico use a metal bucket and a fire.
     

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  13. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Cost advantage to making a sink opposed to buying one?

    I had a small stainless steel sink original galley equipment that came with 'GRAVY'.
    I sold it for $5.
    Stainless isn't stain PROOF or stain FREE! It just stains (rusts) LESS!
    That 47 year old sink stood up pretty well, though had some rust spots and rust freckles.
    Wasn't big enough for my cooler.
    AND, the plumbing was shot!
    The basket in the basket strainer was missing, and the piping rusted through in places.
    A new sink is more than $5. just the basket strainer is more than $5.

    Anyway, I used a quart of polyester resin laying up the castings, and about 2 sq yards of mat. Resin costs me $27 a gallon and mat $3 sq yard.
    About $13 cost for both sinks.
    I reinforced and thickened the sink shells with salvaged pieces of fiberglass from the wrecks and some old mat someone allowed to get wet, which had disintegrated into a big bag of loose fibers and offered to me free. Another half gallon of laminating resin for the two sinks.
    At this stage, about $14 each sink is my cost.

    They'll never rust. They're much thicker, sturdier than the thin stamped metal sink. They're perfect fits for the mini-fridge.
    And the plumbing is integral to the sinks. Cast as part of, not screwed/gasketed together.

    Included in the salon sink, but didn't bother with for the cockpit fish cleaning station, is a homemade plastic basket strainer, to catch rings or other valuable items that could be swallowed by the drain.
    I know I got a picture of it somewhere!
    Made it from a plastic measuring cup, by cutting a series of thin slots along part of one side/bottom. A sump, strainer receiver, in the sink bottom, molded around the measuring cup, has the drain spigot glassed integral.
    The neat thing I think, is the measuring cup is exactly the size of the cap on spray cans of paint.
    Of course they don't have a little handle, but could become emergency replacement strainers with the cutting of a few slits. :D
     
  14. Justaguy
    Joined: Nov 2015
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    Justaguy Junior Member

    Hot sand!

    I've just recently begun to experiment with the wonderful world of malleable PVC. Love the hot sand idea! Thanks.
     

  15. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    You are welcome.
    PVC deteriorates and becomes brittle exposed to UV after awhile.
    To preserve, paint with UV resistant paint, or better yet wrap in fiberglass made with polyester resin. (naturally UV resistant)
    My boats are 45 and 47 years old and the polyester not UV damaged!
    Epoxy resin is strong but not UV resistant and needs protection by painting.
     
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