Grand Banks 42 classic

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by franco, Oct 11, 2020.

  1. franco
    Joined: Oct 2020
    Posts: 5
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: western australia

    franco Junior Member

    is this boat a trawler?
     
  2. brendan gardam
    Joined: Feb 2020
    Posts: 367
    Likes: 42, Points: 28
    Location: east gippsland australia

    brendan gardam Senior Member

    Yes, grand banks 42 is a trawler style cruiser. One of my uncles has one with twin john deere engines. Lovely boat and very economical.
     
  3. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 1,739
    Likes: 547, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 37
    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Here is some more info about the Grand Banks 42 Classic.
    Grand Banks 42: Used Boat Review - boats.com https://www.boats.com/reviews/used-boat-review-grand-banks-42/

    I remember seeing adverts for them in the 70's, and they usually had a pair of 120 hp Ford Lehman diesels then.
    As the above article notes, they were later supplied with much bigger engines.

    One tends to think of a traditional 'trawler' as being strictly a displacement vessel, but nowadays it seems to apply to a wide range of boats that 'look' like trawlers (re the wheelhouse / deckhouse arrangement), yet they have large engines, and might be capable of cruising at 20 knots.
     
  4. franco
    Joined: Oct 2020
    Posts: 5
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: western australia

    franco Junior Member

    Great! Thank you.

    So as a trawler is it a semi-displacement or full displacement? I think (from the little I know) it's a semi-displacement but not sure.
    Now, if it is a semi-displacement, my understanding is that running at small speed, the boat behaves as a full disp and is reliable and safe while at speed increase it will reach the point of lifting and reduce drag.
    Is this correct?

    Franco
     
  5. brendan gardam
    Joined: Feb 2020
    Posts: 367
    Likes: 42, Points: 28
    Location: east gippsland australia

    brendan gardam Senior Member

    my uncles grand banks is a 70's model semi displacement. cruises at 9 kts
     
  6. jacobgoona
    Joined: Dec 2020
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Florida

    jacobgoona Junior Member

    Yup grand banks are certainly trollers , I think they range in speed typically anywhere from 9-22 knots . But this really depends on what year they are from. Some of the new ones are much much faster.
     
  7. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 4,885
    Likes: 424, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1485
    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    There is no legal or official definition of what constitutes a "trawler" yacht.

    My understanding is the use of "trawler" to describe recreational power boats with certain characteristics dates back to the 1960's when a boat builder or importer used it in their advertising. The boats tend to be a bit heavier than to most recreational power boats and have traditional styling cues with the wheelhouse midships 0r forward of midships. The styling is typically closer to Pacific Northwest and Alaska commercial fishing trollers than commercial fishing trawlers but usually the name trawler is used rather than troller.
     
    bajansailor likes this.
  8. franco
    Joined: Oct 2020
    Posts: 5
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: western australia

    franco Junior Member

    yep, but I still prefer a ford lehman 120hp to the cat 3208T. You can hardly move around the cat and I don't need to race.
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 9,588
    Likes: 810, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Trawlers trollers what's in a name, a rose by any other name would smell the same. Certainly a boat with a trawl net out, moving at 20 knots, would have a fuel bill to behold.
     
  10. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,469
    Likes: 331, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1669
    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    Typically trawler yachts are most economical when going at displacement speeds, generally 9-10 Knots. The ones that have lots of power and can be considered semi-displacement, burn a lot more fuel at semi-displacement speeds. So if economy is what you're after get one that runs mostly at displacement speeds, with a smaller engine like the Ford Lehman or equivalent. Years ago someone explained to me the difference between a troller yacht and a trawler yacht but I can't remember what it was. In commercial fishing there are stark differences between a troller and a trawler.
     
  11. rangebowdrie
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 85
    Likes: 35, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Oregon

    rangebowdrie Junior Member

    Yes,, "traditionally" a GB42 has more in common with a West Coast salmon troller, which deploys lines/lures from astern,
    and fish are pulled aboard more or less one at a time whilst the vessel remains underway.
    Whereas a Nordhavn more closely resembles an East Coast haddock trawler which deploys nets from amidships and stops when the net is full to gather the catch aboard.
    Then we have "trawlers" which deploy/retrieve their nets behind the wheelhouse called "Stern Trawlers".
    Fishing practice dictated that "real" trawlers were of greater beam and displacement in order to safely lift huge nets full of fish aboard with masts/booms.
     
    bajansailor likes this.
  12. brendan gardam
    Joined: Feb 2020
    Posts: 367
    Likes: 42, Points: 28
    Location: east gippsland australia

    brendan gardam Senior Member

    The admidships trawlers here are called purse seiners.
     
  13. brendan gardam
    Joined: Feb 2020
    Posts: 367
    Likes: 42, Points: 28
    Location: east gippsland australia

    brendan gardam Senior Member

    I have owned ford Lehmans. Leaky noisy things but reliable.the john Deere engines are much quieter and smoother. They were also sold by grandbanks as their own engine known as american marine.
     

  14. rangebowdrie
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 85
    Likes: 35, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Oregon

    rangebowdrie Junior Member

    I was quite fortunate to have been able to spend some time with Tony Fleming in ~1984/5, when he had left
    American Marine and was starting his Fleming Yachts program.
    We met/conversed at the home of Robert Dorris NA, who himself had been involved with American Marine, and had designed one of the Alaskan series, (I've forgotten which one).
    When Tony left American Marine he took with him the first, (and maybe the only,) GB42 ever built that was single screw.
    It had a Gardner engine.
    I got the idea that he knew how to build a successful boat.
     
    brendan gardam likes this.
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.