Good advice from experienced Mariners

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by space2525, Mar 1, 2006.

  1. space2525
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: california

    space2525 New Member

    I know a couple in their mid to late 30's, have purchased a 38 foot 2 master (I don't know the type of hull) which needs extensive repair. Their goal is to take to the sea for a few years at a time.

    My question is for them: It appears they have a lot to learn (lots of sailing on the eastern seas in a 28 footer, no building experience) for restoration. A lot of money and time also.

    Is it realistic to restore this vessel? (i know a lot more is needed by way of specifics, it appears they believe they have 5 years of part time restoration ahead of them, as an experienced builder related to them) They want children at some point in their lives. They have each a good paying job.

    Should they consider leasing a sea-worthy craft? Saving and buying one? Going ahead with 5 years of restoration?

    Tough question, just general advice, I suppose.
     
  2. safewalrus
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Bloody ambitious one too! Is the boat a 'classic'? why do they want to restore this one? What are they like with a hammer and nails (I mean have they actually built anything - don't need to be nautical! Dog house things like that, even hung a few pictures if you can't do that forget it)!

    Possible breeding program? what you going to do with the dwarves? 38 feet is a bit small for a couple of squaling brats! And a bit big for single handing? "They've" set themselves a BIG project, projects like these tend to get passed on to someone else after a couple of years of messing around unless the people involved are really dedicated! It they are that dedicated they don't need to ask these damn fool questions! Try something smaller, build a skiff for example (if you still want to play after that the mother vessel has a new skiff!) Best of Luck with the project if "they" decide to proceed, guess they will need it! (Conversely they may go well - depends on both Luck and level of dedication) :)
     
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  3. Gilbert
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    Gilbert Senior Member

    I met a family of five (parents and 3 daughters) who had lived and sailed aboard a 27' Islander (I think it was an Islander) for over 20 years. I mean the boat WAS their home period. And they sailed all over.
    My advice is do what you think you want to do. Don't delay starting your family. Don't delay refurbishing the boat. Don't delay going voyaging.
     
  4. longliner45
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    longliner45 Senior Member

    thats right ,,,,,, it only happens if you make it happen
     
  5. safewalrus
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    Location: Cornwall, England

    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Agreed, but those who want to make it happen get on with it, they don't post things to forums asking for reasons why not! Them as do that are the real dreamers and they need to justify why! I'm not knocking them, any of them (done a bit of dreaming myself - dreamt I was a seafaring chap myself once, woke up and found it was true, s**t myself did I? 'specially when I found I was the navigating chappie!):)
     
  6. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    messabout Senior Member

    Major restoration efforts by amateurs make questionable fiscal sense. These people have good paying jobs. They can make a lot more money by doing what they do than embarking on an unfamiliar project. Saving carefully over a five year span should buy a pretty decent boat. Consider that the savings account will earn some interest and be compounded. Beginners will expend several times the effort and time than an experienced boat builder would need. Professionals can also find the right materials and probably buy it for less than we amateurs will spend.

    I am guilty of not heeding my own counsel of course. I've built a number of boats and repaired countless ones. The time I spent doing those things could have been spent more constructively. I, and many others of us, am capable of making more money at my profession, in a given period of time, than I would save by busting my knuckles on some damned boat.

    If the people involved are smitten by the romance and/or adventure of building or rebuilding, then common sense is not the deciding factor. But if these are real practical folks then they'll save money and buy a boat when the time comes. It is even possible that they will have changed their objectives in the five year interval. If you have spent all that time and money working on the boat, then there are fewer or perhaps no options.
     
  7. safewalrus
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Exactly as I said you either do, now, don't make much money, bounce from crisis to crisis, have great fun, go mad and die a happy pauper (sound familiar anyone?) or You sits at home dreaming of the right time, go to work each day, live a respectable live, dream a bit more, find its too late, die filty rich but bored 5h1tless! Either way you end up dead! So what's it to be?
    Happy or Crappy or Happy (depends on your definition of happiness) there's no right and no wrong way, just your way, not my way - I'm different, not his way - he's different, not her way - she's different - just your way -GO DO IT!
     
  8. Ari
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Ari Patience s/o Genius

    Just do it..thats right..just do it..:!: some love to work on projects..what important to them is the project..not the end result like sailing in the boat for a few years after spending a few years at restoration..just like enthusiast who will buy old British make bike and keep on working on the bike for years with no end..just for the sake of it..doing what they love..:) tinkering with it..not actual riding..;) Personally I will suggest to them to buy a boat that they can afford and start sailing..if..sailing is their actual interest:cool: .
     
  9. Tim B
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    Tim B Senior Member

    I'm sure that most people here will agree that boat upkeep is a major part of this hobby/profession that we are in.

    Just for a moment, consider the "expensive way to do it" simply by paying someone else to refit or repair the boat. There are a lot who have plenty of cash and who will do this. But they're probably not the best sailors.

    Now think about the "cheap way" spending lots of time but relatively little money. When you've finished sorting out the boat, you'll have gained an awful lot of skills at the expense of a bit of time. You'll be an electrician (12 volt at least), carpenter, metalworker (to an extent) and probably able to do a GRP layup too (to name a few skills).

    What really makes me glad that I did it was that for the money I would have spent getting someone else to restore my boat, I couldn't have gained all the skills. And now if something fails, I can sort it reasonably quickly; or at least know how dangerous it will be.

    I say do it. The only reason not to is experience, and you gain that along the way. Just take it slow and steady. Read the books, search the web, and ask questions, most people are willing to help and will give good advice.

    Tim B.
     
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  10. longliner45
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    longliner45 Senior Member

    just me ,but I would rather do it myself ,for one you know without a doubt what you have ,and I really dont trust anyone else not that I am a master builder or anything ,and it isnt always pretty ,but strong or a little overbuilt were I think it counts ,but ya just dont know about other peoples work ethics and morals,I mean will he or she cut corners that they assume I dont need?
     
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  11. ajssweett
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    ajssweett New Member

    inexperienced mariner

    I'm not much good at these things but here are my thoughts on the subject of big projects.
    People take them on for many reasons. Maybe the finished product is a byproduct and it's the labour that gives the most satisfaction. I have been building a 38 foot from plans for nearly half my life and it still keeps myt mind occupied daily. I have moved it overland 1500 miles, built two shops for IT, and even if I never sail around the world, just the mental exercise over 20 some years is well worth the effort.
    I have been critisized, joked about and even complimented a time or two but it is important to keep in your mind why you are doing what you are and try to involve as many friends as possible. Maybe they to will take up a project others will think crazy.

    A. J. Sweet
    Sudbury Ontario, Canada
     

  12. gypsiemarine
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Malaysia

    gypsiemarine Gypsie Marine

    Randall Gypsie Marine

    I aggree with Gilbert, you wanna do then do it. You only have one life
     
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